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Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of thromboxane A2 receptor antagonists and thromboxane synthase inhibitors on osteogenic sarcoma cell-induced platelet aggregation
De Leval, X.; Benoit, V.; Neven, P. et al

Poster (2002, March 02)

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See detailEffects of thromboxane A2 receptor antagonists and thromboxane synthase inhibitors on osteogenic sarcoma cell-induced platelet aggregation
De Leval, X.; Benoit, V.; Neven, P. et al

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (2002)

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See detailEffects of thromboxane A2 receptor antagonists and thromboxane synthase inhibitors on osteogenic sarcoma cell-induced platelet aggregation
De Leval, X.; Benoit, V.; Neven, P. et al

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (2002), 16

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See detailEffects of tiaprofenic acid and acethylsalicylic acid on human articular chondrocytes in 3-dimensional culture
Bassleer, C; Henrotin, Yves ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Rheumatology (1992), 19

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See detailEffects of tillage practices and crop residue exportation on earthworm communities and soil physico-­chemical properties in silt loam arable soil (Belgium)
Lemtiri, Aboulkacem ULiege; Colinet, Gilles ULiege; Alabi, Taofic ULiege et al

Poster (2014, June 08)

Earthworms are known to play integral roles in soils, and are often referred to as vital soil and ecosystem engineers due to their capacity to influence a wide range of chemical, physical, and biological ... [more ▼]

Earthworms are known to play integral roles in soils, and are often referred to as vital soil and ecosystem engineers due to their capacity to influence a wide range of chemical, physical, and biological properties of soil environments. Therefore, it is important to understand how earthworm communities are impacted by tillage systems and crop management practices. In the present study, earthworm and soil samples were collected from wheat cultivated fields in Gembloux, Belgium under the following four experimental treatments: (1) conventional tillage with crop residues left in the soil (CT/IN); (2) conventional tillage with crop residues removed from the field (CT/OUT); (3) reduced tillage with crop residues left in the soil (RT/IN); and (4) reduced tillage with crop residues removed from the field (RT/OUT). The different tillage systems were applied for four consecutive years prior to the initiation of the current study. Results indicated soil compaction was significantly higher in RT compared with CT up to a depth of 6–49 cm. Significant differences were not detected between residue incorporation depth systems, where results showed mean earthworm abundance was respectively 182.25 and 180 individuals.m-2 in CT and RT. Mean earthworm biomass was similarly not significantly different between CT and RT, where results were respectively 48.52 and 57.27 g.m-2. However, a significant difference was observed between IN and OUT treatments, suggesting the exportation of wheat residues will limit earthworm abundance and biomass in CT and RT plots. Data showed high representation of the endogeic earthworm ecological category, notably N. c. caliginosus regardless of treatment. Despite tillage system and exportation of crop residues, N. c. caliginosus, L. terrestris, and A. r. rosea exhibited high abundance, indicating tolerance to soil environmental conditions. For each depth, measures of soil physico-chemical properties showed significant differences among treatments. Furthermore, soil chemical property attributes were significantly higher in the first soil centimetres compared to lower soil layers. These results were attributable to earthworm activity and wheat residues, suggesting earthworms contributed to nutrient dynamics, particularly at increased soil depths. Overall, the results emphasise the influence of exportation of crop residues on earthworm community and also, the important influence of earthworm activity on soil physico-chemical properties change, processes which are closely linked. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of time of day on age-related differences in cognitive tests.
Schmitz, Xavier ULiege; Willems, Sylvie ULiege; Meulemans, Thierry ULiege

Poster (2009, June 03)

Previous studies have shown a shift in the circadian rhythm – and more particularly in the optimal time of day (OTD) – across the adult life span (May et al., 1993). The aim of this study was to ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have shown a shift in the circadian rhythm – and more particularly in the optimal time of day (OTD) – across the adult life span (May et al., 1993). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive efficiency and OTD in 113 healthy old adults (Age: M = 69, SD = 6.1, Range = 60-80) and 175 younger adults (M = 40.8, SD = 12.9, Range = 20-59). Participants performed a large battery of cognitive tests that assessed episodic memory, working memory, executive and attentional functions. Results on the MEQ (Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire; Horne & Östberg, 1976) confirmed the age-related shift toward a self-reported morning preference in older adults. Second, the categorization of participants according to their MEQ scores and the time of testing revealed that the OTD has a greater impact upon cognitive performance in older than in younger adults. Third, the age-related OTD impact was more striking in working memory (Brown-Peterson and Pasat) and episodic memory tasks (Buschke) than in other aspects of the cognitive functioning. In conclusion, older participants tested during their peak circadian periods tend to show greater performance on memory tasks that require careful or strategic processing relative to older participants who are tested at off-peak times of day. Taken together, these findings indicate that care must be taken when investigators are considering the effects of age on effortful memory tasks, which are particularly modulated by OTD in older adults. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of timing of insemination and GnRH treatment on pregnancy rates of N’Dama females after induction of oestrus with progestin
Okouyi M’foumou W’otari, Marcel; Hanzen, Christian ULiege

in Revue d'Elévage et de Médecine Vétérinaire des Pays Tropicaux (2016), 69(2), 73-78

The aim of this clinical trial was to quantify the results of pregnancy after treating trypanotolerant N'Dama female cattle (n=168) using a CIDR® (1.38g of progesterone) inserted for seven days. An ... [more ▼]

The aim of this clinical trial was to quantify the results of pregnancy after treating trypanotolerant N'Dama female cattle (n=168) using a CIDR® (1.38g of progesterone) inserted for seven days. An intramuscular (IM) PG injection (500µg of cloprostenol) was administered two days before removal of the device. Subsequently, an IM injection of 400UI of eCG was administered when the device was removed. The animals were inseminated respectively 48 (Group 1) and 72 hours (Group 2) after removal of the CIDR®. In both groups, half the animals were treated with 4.2µg of buserelin acetate and the other half with 1ml of physiological saline. Four protocols were thus tested: CIDR-PG-eCG/IA48h, CIDR-PG-eCG/IA48h/GnRH+, CIDR-PG-eCG/IA72h, and CIDR-PG-eCG/IA72h/GnRH+. A pregnancy diagnosis has been done by echography 45 to 60 days after insemination. The average pregnancy rate was 37.5% (n=168). That of the adult cows (43.2%, n=111) was significantly (P < 0.03) higher than that of the heifers (26.3%, n=57). The pregnancy rate observed in animals in Group 2 (48.8%) was significantly higher (P < 0.002) than that observed in the animals in Group 1 (26.2%). Physiological condition and the injection of GnRH at the time of insemination had no significant impact on the pregnancy rate. The hormonal protocol using CIDR-PG-eCG (400UI) and a timed artificial insemination 72 h later improves the pregnancy rates in the N’Dama female. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of trace metals on mouse B16 melanoma cells in culture
Bahbouth, Eliane; Siwek, Brigitte; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire ULiege et al

in Biological Trace Element Research (1993), 36(2), 191-201

The effects of fourteen metal ions on B16 cell proliferation, differentiation and melanogenesis have been analysed.

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See detailEffects of training on delayed onset muscle soreness following isokinetic eccentric exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege; Camus, Gérard; Ledent, M. et al

in Archives of Physiology & Biochemistry (1999, September), 107(suppl september 1999), 101

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See detailEffects of Training on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Interleukin 6 Production
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege; Camus, G.; Venneman, Ingrid ULiege et al

in Muscle & Nerve (1999), 22(2), 208-12

To address the question of whether the increased plasma concentration of interleukin 6 (IL-6) following strenuous muscular work could be related to exercise-induced muscle damage, 5 moderately active male ... [more ▼]

To address the question of whether the increased plasma concentration of interleukin 6 (IL-6) following strenuous muscular work could be related to exercise-induced muscle damage, 5 moderately active male volunteers underwent two isokinetic exercise sessions in the eccentric mode, separated by a period of 3 weeks during which the subjects underwent five training sessions. Before training, exercise was followed by severe muscle pain (delayed-onset muscle soreness; DOMS), and by significant increases in plasma IL-6 level and serum myoglobin concentration (SMb) (P < 0.001). After training, postexercise DOMS and SMb values were significantly lower than those measured before training. There was no significant difference between plasma IL-6 levels measured at the same time points before and after training. We conclude that the hypothetical relationship between exercise-induced muscle damage and increased postexercise levels of circulating IL-6 is not substantiated by the present results. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of training on myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness following maximal isokinetic eccentric exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege; Camus, Gérard; Duchateau, J. et al

in Mediators of Inflammation (1997), 6

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See detailThe effects of training on ventilation and blood gases in exercising Thoroughbreds
Roberts, C. A.; Marlin, D. J.; Lekeux, Pierre ULiege

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (1999), 30

The effects of training on ventilation and blood gases during exercise were investigated in 6 clinically normal, detrained Thoroughbred horses. They underwent a 16 week training programme similar to the ... [more ▼]

The effects of training on ventilation and blood gases during exercise were investigated in 6 clinically normal, detrained Thoroughbred horses. They underwent a 16 week training programme similar to the type frequently used for Thoroughbred racehorses in Great Britain. Standardized treadmill exercise tests (2 min canter at 8 and 10 m/s C8 and C10[ and 2 min gallop at 12 m/s [G12], on a level surface) were performed prior to and after 16 weeks of training. Respiratory flow rates were measured using ultrasound flow transducers. Blood samples were drawn from a transverse facial artery and the right atrium. Minute ventilation, respiratory frequency and tidal volume were not significantly altered by training. Peak inspiratory flow rate was lower following training at 8 and 10 m/s, but not at 12 m/s. Arterial oxygen tension was decreased during trot and canter following training. Blood lactate concentration post G12 decreased following training (10.5 +/- 2.2 mmol/l vs. 7.7 +/- 2.2 mmol/l; P < 0.05). The increase in the degree of exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia following training may reflect a lack of pulmonary adaptation to training in the face of improved cardiovascular and muscular function. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of transcranial magnetic stimulation coil orientation and pulse width on short-latency afferent inhibition
Hannah, Ricci; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULiege; Goetz, Stefan et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailEffects of transforming growth factor-beta 1 on human adrenocortical fasciculata-reticularis cell differentiated functions.
LEBRETHON, Marie-Christine ULiege; Jaillard, C.; Naville, D. et al

in The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism (1994), 79(4), 1033-9

Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF beta 1) has been reported to have a strong inhibitory effect on the specific function of adrenal cells of several species. In the present study, we examined the ... [more ▼]

Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF beta 1) has been reported to have a strong inhibitory effect on the specific function of adrenal cells of several species. In the present study, we examined the effects of TGF beta 1 on cultured human fasciculata-reticularis cells. TGF beta 1 alone had no effect on ACTH receptor messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels and was unable to reduce the strong stimulatory effects of ACTH on its own receptor. However, TGF beta 1 enhanced angiotensin-II type 1 receptor mRNA and binding sites. Treatment with TGF beta 1 increased significantly the levels of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase mRNA, reduced those of cytochrome P-450 17 alpha-hydroxylase mRNA, and had no effect on cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 mRNA. Whatever the experimental condition, TGF beta 1 did not reduce basal or ACTH-stimulated cortisol production, but the production of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate of TGF beta 1-treated cells was always decreased. The effects of TGF beta 1 on 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase mRNA and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were opposite the change observed at the time of adrenarche. As adrenal cells express TGF beta 1 mRNA, it is tempting to postulate that a local diminution of TGF beta 1 might be involved in adrenarche. Our findings also illustrate the specific species differences and, therefore, the caution to extrapolate to humans the results observed in other species. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of transfusion on serum iron, serum lactate dehydrogenase and platelets in megaloblastic anemia
Fillet, Georges ULiege; Andrien, J.-M.; Bury, Jean

in American Journal of Clinical Pathology (1977), 68

In 11 patients with megaloblastic anemia, transfusion of packed erythrocytes or washed erythrocytes invariably resulted in a decline in plasma iron concentration to a range of 20-90 µg/dl (3.6 - 16 µmol/l ... [more ▼]

In 11 patients with megaloblastic anemia, transfusion of packed erythrocytes or washed erythrocytes invariably resulted in a decline in plasma iron concentration to a range of 20-90 µg/dl (3.6 - 16 µmol/l) after 36 or 48 hours. The same phenomenon was observed in two of six cases of ineffective erythropoiesis without megaloblastosis and in none of five cases of aplastic anemia. The observed changes did not result from a specific hematinic response or from iron uptake by a non-erythroid compartment. In megaloblastic anemia, alteration in marrow function in response to transfusion was reflected by plasma iron kinetics and serum lactate dehydrogenase values, which indicated marked reductions in both marrow hyperplasia and ineffective erythropoieseis. Transfusion in megaloblastic anemia was also responsible for a 50% reduction in platelet count after 2 to 6 days. The significance of these changes is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of tree species diversity on earthworm communities in European forests
de Wandeler, Hans; Ottoy, Sam; Hermy, Martin et al

Poster (2012, July)

The belowground food web holds a big part of the associated biodiversity in forest ecosystems and plays a major role in essential ecosystem processes, e.g. litter decomposition and nutrient turnover. So ... [more ▼]

The belowground food web holds a big part of the associated biodiversity in forest ecosystems and plays a major role in essential ecosystem processes, e.g. litter decomposition and nutrient turnover. So far, important interactions between diversity and composition of above-and belowground food webs have been observed. However the effects of tree species diversity on the belowground food web are so far not conclusive. This study aims at elucidating the effect of tree species mixtures, species diversity and trait diversity on the composition of the earthworm communities in European forests. Experimental platforms of planted tree species diversity assemblages in Finland (Satakunta) and Germany (Biotree) are therefore intensively sampled for earthworms using the combined mustard extraction/hand sorting method. First results are reported and discussed and diversity effects are evaluated with overyielding tests. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) on the reproduction of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis
Lagadic, Laurent; Giusti, Arnaud ULiege; Barsi, Alpar et al

Conference (2012, December 10)

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See detailThe effects of triclosan exposure in shape changes of sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during early development and metamorphosis
Schnitzler, Joseph ULiege; Frederich, Bruno ULiege; Dussenne, Mélanie ULiege et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2015, August), 77

Thyroid hormones are essential for normal development, and for maintenance of normal physiological functions in vertebrates [1, 2]. In fish, thyroid hormones are involved in the control of osmoregulation ... [more ▼]

Thyroid hormones are essential for normal development, and for maintenance of normal physiological functions in vertebrates [1, 2]. In fish, thyroid hormones are involved in the control of osmoregulation, metabolism, somatic growth and post-hatching metamorphosis [1, 3, 4]. The regulation of thyroid hormone bioavailability in tissues and cells represents a very complex and unique web of feedback systems [2]. In fish and other vertebrates the thyroid cascade involves two components. First, thyroxine (T4) biosynthesis and secretion are largely under central control by the brain–pituitary–thyroid axis [5]. Second, there is the conversion of T4 to its biologically active form 3,5,3-triiodothyronine (T3) and its metabolism and receptor-mediated actions that seems largely to be under peripheral control in extra-thyroidal tissues [6]. The accumulation in the aquatic environment of anthropogenic chemicals, among which are endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that alter normal hormonal regulation, is having dramatic consequences for humans and wildlife. Numerous chemicals disrupt thyroid homeostasis affecting thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis and transport, and cellular uptake and metabolism [7, 8]. Triclosan (TCS) is a synthetic chlorinated phenolic compound with a generalized use as an antimicrobial and preservative in many personal care and household products [9-11]. As a result of disposal of TCS through sewage systems and insufficient/variable removal by wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) [9], widespread contamination with TCS has been detected in several countries, particularly in aquatic ecosystems, WWTP influents and effluents; sludges and biosolids; surface or ground water; drinking water; and aquatic sediments [9-11]. TCS and its metabolites have been detected in tissues and body fluids of aquatic organisms including fish, revealing they are accumulating in the food chain [9-11] and TCS has also been detected in human blood, breast milk and urine [9-11]. The structural similarity of TCS with THs [9] suggest it may have adverse effects on the thyroid system. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which TCS disrupts the thyroid axis. TCS effects on fish thyroid axis have not been investigated. It is possible, that the TCS toxic effects reported in fish embryos, larvae and adults [9-11] might be caused, at least in part, through its effect on the thyroid system. We determined how TCS affect ontogenic variations of thyroid hormones in developing sheepshead minnow larvae. Knowing that thyroid hormones are involved in somatic growth and post-hatching metamorphosis, we also tested the hypothesis that TCS alter the development of these larvae. To do this, we used landmark-based geometric morphometric methods. These methods allowed us to analyse the pure shape variations of our developing larvae, regardless orientation, position, and size. [less ▲]

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