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See detailA field-based crop and land use map over Sanjiang Plain in Heilongjiang derived from multi-temporal imagery of Landsat7-ETM+.
Eerens, Herman; Dong, Qinghan; Ozer, Pierre ULg et al

in Tychon, Bernard (Ed.) Belgian and Chinese Crop Growth Monitoring Systems: comparison, adaptation and improvement (2003)

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See detailField-dependent vortex pinning strength in a periodic array of antidots
Silhanek, Alejandro ULg; Raedts, S.; Lange et al

in Physical Review. B : Condensed Matter (2003), 67(6),

We explore the dynamic response of vortex lines in a Pb thin film with a periodic array of antidots by means of ac-susceptibility measurements. For low drive field amplitudes, within the Campbell regime ... [more ▼]

We explore the dynamic response of vortex lines in a Pb thin film with a periodic array of antidots by means of ac-susceptibility measurements. For low drive field amplitudes, within the Campbell regime, vortex motion is of intravalley type and the penetration depth is related to the curvature of the pinning potential well alpha. For dc fields below the first matching field H-1, alpha reaches its highest value associated with a Mott insulator like phase where vortex lines are strongly localized at the pinning sites. For H-1<H-dc<H-2, the response is mainly due to the interstitial vortices and α drops to smaller values as expected for this metallic like regime. Strikingly, for H-2<H-dc<H-3, we observe that α reduces further down. However, for H-3<H-dc<H-4, a reentrance in the pinning strength is observed, due to a specific configuration of the flux-line lattice which strongly restricts the mobility of vortices. We present a possible explanation for the measured α(H-dc) dependence based on the different flux-line lattice configurations. [less ▲]

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See detailField-guide of the excursion on September 13th, 2008, an introduction.
Damblon, Freddy ULg; Pirson, Stéphane ULg; Gerrienne, Philippe ULg

in Memoirs of the Geological Survey of Belgium (2008), 55

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See detailLa fièvre aphteuse : les propriétés du virus expliquent sa grande contagiosité
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Baazizi, Ratiba

in Bulletin des Groupements Techniques Vétérinaires (1999), 4

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See detailla fièvre aphteuse : rappels épidémiologiques et cliniques
Thiry, Etienne ULg

in Point Vétérinaire (2001), 32

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See detailFièvre catarrhale ovine : l’Europe au carrefour de l’enzootie
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Berkvens, D.; Mellor, P. S. et al

in Point Vétérinaire (2008), 290

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See detailFièvre catarrhale ovine : Résultats de l’enquête postale auprès des vétérinaires
Hanon, J. B.; Uyttenhoef, Aude ULg; Otto, J. M. et al

in Veterinaria (2009)

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See detailFièvre Catarrhale Ovine chez les ruminants. Description clinique des cas vécus dans le Nord de l’Europe durant l’été-automne 2006
Guyot, Hugues ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Thiry, Etienne ULg et al

in Bulletin des GTV (2007)

La fièvre catarrhale ovine (FCO) a été identifiée au Nord de l’Europe le 14 août 2006. L’Allemagne, la Belgique, les Pays-Bas et, dans une moindre mesure, le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg et la France ont été ... [more ▼]

La fièvre catarrhale ovine (FCO) a été identifiée au Nord de l’Europe le 14 août 2006. L’Allemagne, la Belgique, les Pays-Bas et, dans une moindre mesure, le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg et la France ont été affectés. Le sérotype 8 du virus de la FCO (exotique) a rapidement été identifié ainsi qu’un vecteur, Culicoides dewulfi, une espèce indigène du Nord de l’Europe. La maladie s’est rapidement développée et au 1er février 2007, on recensait 2137 foyers de FCO, toutes espèces de ruminants confondues. Globalement, la maladie a affecté davantage les bovins (54 %) que les ovins (46 %). Les signes cliniques le plus fréquemment observés chez les bovins étaient des lésions sur le museau et la cavité buccale (ulcérations/croûtes), de la salivation et des boiteries chez des animaux adultes. La morbidité et la mortalité animales étaient respectivement de maximum 5 % et 1 %. Les principaux signes cliniques rencontrés chez le mouton étaient également des lésions sur le museau et la cavité buccale (ulcérations/croûtes), de l’amaigrissement et des boiteries. La morbidité et la mortalité animales étaient respectivement de maximum 12 % et 6 %. Les signes cliniques n’étant pas pathognomoniques et le diagnostic différentiel relativement vaste, seul un examen de laboratoire permet de poser un diagnostic de certitude. [less ▲]

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See detailLa fièvre catarrhale ovine est-elle installée durablement?
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Gauthier, J. F.

in Point Vétérinaire (2007), 281

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See detailFièvre catharrale ovine en Europe du Nord : apparition de nouveaux sérotypes sur fond d’enzootie
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULg

in Bulletin - Office International des Epizooties (2009)

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See detailFièvre chez le cheval adulte : approche diagnostique et clinique
Amory, Hélène ULg

in Pratique Vétérinaire Equine (2004), 36

Chez le cheval, la cause de la fièvre peut être de nature infectieuse (le plus souvent), néoplasique, inflammatoire ou immune. En pratique, pour localiser le trouble et en déterminer la nature, le ... [more ▼]

Chez le cheval, la cause de la fièvre peut être de nature infectieuse (le plus souvent), néoplasique, inflammatoire ou immune. En pratique, pour localiser le trouble et en déterminer la nature, le vétérinaire aborde un animal souffrant de fièvre en cinq étapes successives : anamnèse ; examen général ; examen clinique approfondi du ou des systèmes qui semblent affectés ; examens cliniques complémentaires ; examens complémentaires de laboratoire. [less ▲]

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See detailFièvre d’origine inconnue chez le chat: que faire quand ce n’est pas la PIF?
Peeters, Dominique ULg

in Proceedings of the 15th FECAVA Congress (2009, November)

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See detailFièvre méditerranéenne familiale
Leclercq, P.; Hermesse, A.; Malaise, Michel ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2004), 59(5), 320-325

Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is an hereditary disease that especially affects people living around the Mediterranean sea. It is characterized by recurring fever and abdominal pain, eventually ... [more ▼]

Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is an hereditary disease that especially affects people living around the Mediterranean sea. It is characterized by recurring fever and abdominal pain, eventually associated with localised pleuritis, synovitis or skin inflammation. The most serious complication is amyloidosis, which can lead to terminal renal failure. The attacks and complications can be avoided by life long administration of colchicine. Two independent French and American teams discovered the gene responsible for the disease in 1997. It encodes for a protein named pyrin/marenostrin involved in the homeostasis the inflammatory mechanisms. The main mutations have been identified and are henceforth accessible for molecular screening. [less ▲]

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See detailLes fièvres prolongées d'origine néoplasique
Fillet, Georges ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1980), 35

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See detailFifteen years-trend characteristics of key stratospheric constituents monitored by FTIR above the Jungfraujoch.
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Zander, Rodolphe ULg; Demoulin, Philippe ULg et al

in Harris, N. R. P.; Guirlet, M.; Amanatidis, G. T. (Eds.) Air Pollution Report 73 EUR 19340 (2000)

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See detailFifth Edition of the International Directory of Amateur Astronomical Societies
Heck, A.; Manfroid, Jean ULg

in Bulletin d'Information du Centre de Donnees Stellaires (1984), 26

Not Available

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See detailFifth International Conference on Advanced COmputational Methods in ENgineering (ACOMEN 2011)
Béchet, Eric ULg; Dick, Erik; Geuzaine, Christophe ULg et al

in International Journal of Computational & Applied Mathematics (2013), 246

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See detailFifth supplement to the catalogue of observed periods of Ap stars
Renson, Pierre ULg; Catalano, F. A.

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2001), 378

New data on the periods of Ap stars with references are presented. 161 further stars are introduced for which a periodic variability has recently been discovered or it was known before but it was not ... [more ▼]

New data on the periods of Ap stars with references are presented. 161 further stars are introduced for which a periodic variability has recently been discovered or it was known before but it was not reported in previous issues of this catalogue. For many stars also present in previous issues of the catalogue new determinations of the periods are given. Recently attributed variable star names are also quoted. Tables 1 to 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A&A/378/113 [less ▲]

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See detailFifty years of contrasted residue management of an agricultural crop: impacts on the soil carbon budget and on heterotrophic respiration.
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Roisin, Christian; Aubinet, Marc ULg

in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment (2013), 167

Crop management exerts a strong influence on the soil carbon (C) balance. This study investigated a long-term experiment initiated in 1959 at a site in the Hesbaye region of Belgium and focused on three ... [more ▼]

Crop management exerts a strong influence on the soil carbon (C) balance. This study investigated a long-term experiment initiated in 1959 at a site in the Hesbaye region of Belgium and focused on three contrasted treatments: residue export (RE), farmyard manure (FYM) addition and residue restitution (RR) after harvest. The objectives were to quantify the components of the C budget of croplands from a 50-year perspective and to identify the impact of the treatments on this budget and soil C sequestration, given the relatively low levels of esidue application. The soil C budget was calculated for each treatment on the basis of total soil organic C (SOC) content measurements and C input data collected since the experiment had begun and drawn from the literature. To evaluate the robustness of this approach, the budget-based output estimates were compared with annual heterotrophic respiration (HR) averages extrapolated from seasonal field HR measurements carried out at the same experimental site in 2010. The soil C budgetbased output estimates accorded well with field-based HR measurements and with most HR estimates in the literature, suggesting that, despite the many uncertainties affecting the soil C budget, these results were robust. The three treatments investigated in this study had different impacts on SOC stocks, mainly during the first 20 years of the experiment. RE and FYM caused significant SOC decreases (on average, −7 ± 5 g C m−2 year−1 over the 50 years) and increases (10 ± 5 g C m−2 year−1), espectively, whereas RR had no significant impact on the SOC stocks. The study also showed (i) the very large part (about twothirds of the total input) that represented the below-ground input, weeds and other left-over residues in the C budget, (ii) the important role probably played by residue quality in C sequestration and (iii) the large proportion of C lost annually rom the soil (which represents 93–98, 100 and 102–107% of the amounts of fresh residue rought to the soil each year in the FYM, RR and RE treatments, respectively). [less ▲]

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See detailFifty years of crop residue management have a limited impact on soil heterotrophic respiration.
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Schnepf-Kiss, Anne-Caroline; Carnol, Monique ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2013), 180

The impacts of crop residue management on soil microbial biomass, labile carbon and heterotrophic respiration (HR) were assessed at a long-term experimental site in the Hesbaye region in Belgium. Three ... [more ▼]

The impacts of crop residue management on soil microbial biomass, labile carbon and heterotrophic respiration (HR) were assessed at a long-term experimental site in the Hesbaye region in Belgium. Three treatments, residue export (RE), farmyard manure addition (FYM) and residue restitution after harvest (RR), have been applied continuously since 1959. The soil is a Eutric Cambisol with, in 2010, significantly different total soil organic carbon contents of 4.4, 5.1 and 5.9 kg C m-2 under the RE, RR and FYM treatments, respectively. Manual field HR measurements were carried out during the 2010 and 2012 crop seasons using a dynamic closed chamber system. Microbial biomass, labile C content and metabolic diversity of soil bacteria were assessed in spring 2012. Fifty-one years after the beginning of the treatments, residue management had a limited impact on HR. Based on daily averaged values, the treatment had a significant impact (α = 10%) in 2012 but not in 2010. Based on the individual measurement dates, the treatment impact was less obvious in 2012; with the observation of a significant impact (α = 10%) on HR in only 7% and 36.8% of the measurement dates in 2010 and 2012, respectively. Labile C and microbial biomass were significantly lower in the RE treatment than in FYM and RR. Residue management had no significant effect on cold-water extracted carbon and metabolic diversity of heterotrophic soil bacteria. The limited impact of residue management on HR could be explained by (i) the relatively low amounts of recent above-ground crop inputs, (ii) the large proportion of below-ground residues and other non-exportable above-ground residues reducing the potential differences between treatments and (iii) the relatively large spatial variability of HR. In conclusion, carbon losses due to heterotrophic respiration did not differ between RE, FYM and RR treatments in the studied soil. This contrasts with the different soil organic carbon contents observed in these three treatments after fifty years of experiment. Further investigations regarding the reduction of spatial variability and the potential roles played by organic matter protection within aggregates and biochemical composition of inputs are needed. [less ▲]

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