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See detailEmotion et réalité chez Sartre. Remarques à propos d'une anthropologie philosophique originale
Cormann, Grégory ULg

in Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique (2012), 8(1), 286-302

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (19 ULg)
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See detailL'émotion fondamentale
Caeymaex, Florence ULg; Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2012, June 22)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (14 ULg)
See detailEmotion, corps et conscience magique chez Sartre
Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2011, April 06)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULg)
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See detailEmotion, faux souvenirs DRM et vieillissement normal
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

Poster (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 204 (10 ULg)
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See detailEmotion, faux souvenirs et vieillissement normal.
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in société française de psychologie: cognition, émotion et société - 52eme congrès (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 275 (4 ULg)
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See detailÉmotion, ipséité, liberté. Réflexions à propos des fondements de la théorie sartrienne des émotions
Recchia, Fabio ULg

in Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique (2016), 12(5), 1-23

Entretenue durant la drôle de guerre, la correspondance épistolaire entre De Beauvoir et Sartre révèle une insatisfaction de ce dernier à l'égard de sa théorie des émotions. Celle-ci manquerait en effet ... [more ▼]

Entretenue durant la drôle de guerre, la correspondance épistolaire entre De Beauvoir et Sartre révèle une insatisfaction de ce dernier à l'égard de sa théorie des émotions. Celle-ci manquerait en effet de fondements solides. Répondant à ce constat, nous tenterons de dégager les fondations de cette théorie de manière à expliciter ses enjeux. Nous replacerons, pour ce faire, l'Esquisse d'une théorie des émotions dans la perspective plus générale de la théorie de l'intentionnalité du premier Sartre. De la sorte nous montrerons, d'une part, comment ce texte renouvelle significativement la catégorie de l'action en concevant l'émotion comme une activité ; et nous examinerons, d'autre part, l'interaction existant entre l¿émotion et l'ipséité de la conscience. Cette discussion dévoilera ainsi l'intentionnalité émotive comme une passion active reconduisant au fondement de la conscience qui est sa liberté personnelle. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (14 ULg)
See detailEmotion, mort et conscience. Le premier Sartre et Freud
Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2013, May 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (5 ULg)
See detailEmotion, violence, cohabitation. A propos de Vers la cohabitation de Judith Butler
Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2015, November 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (0 ULg)
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See detailEmotional aspects of mental time travel
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2007), 30

We consider three possible reasons why humans might accord a privileged status to emotional information when mentally traveling backward or forward in time. First, mental simulation of emotional ... [more ▼]

We consider three possible reasons why humans might accord a privileged status to emotional information when mentally traveling backward or forward in time. First, mental simulation of emotional situations helps one to make adaptive decisions. Second, it can serve an emotion regulation function. Third, it helps people to construct and maintain a positive view of the self. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional competencies of the sport coach: A qualitative approach within a physical activity programme for multiple sclerosis patients.
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Defossa, Clément; Cloes, Marc ULg

in Sanchez Molina, J. A.; Carballo, O.; Gonzalez Valeiro, M. A. (Eds.) Actas del Congreso Internacional de la AIESEP 2010 « Place and role of physical educators in promoting an active lifestyle » (2011)

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by functional impairments (fatigue, motor weakness, spasticity, poor balance) and limitations in social functioning. Accordingly, persons with MS are more affected ... [more ▼]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by functional impairments (fatigue, motor weakness, spasticity, poor balance) and limitations in social functioning. Accordingly, persons with MS are more affected by sedentarity and not enough aware of their physical capacities. Finally, those behaviours lead to physical deconditioning and general poor health in this population. To encourage physical activity with MS people, a specific coaching programme whereby MS patient are individually supported by a sport coach has been launched at the University Hospital Center of Liège. In this context this study aimed to (1) describe the intervention of the coach ;(2) link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach ; (3) propose recommendations to improve MS patient’s physical activity management. Behaviors, attitudes, values, representations and emotional competencies of seven coaches were analyzed using both visible (audio and video recording) and invisible (questionnaires and interviews) data. Results show that coaching efficacy with MS patient implies a high support and cooperation level of the coach and a highly specific approach characterized by a systematic appraisal of patient’s behaviors revealing his current psychological and physical state. Recommendations for the coach education with an emphasis on social and emotional skills are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional competencies of the sport coach: A qualitative approach within a physical activity programme for multiple sclerosis patients. A case study
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Defossa, Clément; Cloes, Marc ULg

Poster (2010, October)

The main purposes of this study were to describe the intervention and to link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach in a physical activity programme for MS patients. We wanted also to close ... [more ▼]

The main purposes of this study were to describe the intervention and to link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach in a physical activity programme for MS patients. We wanted also to close this study proposing recommendations to improve MS patient physical activity management. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (28 ULg)
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See detailEmotional distress and family factors as predictors of quality of life in Children with Cystic Fibrosis
Toucheque, Malorie ULg

Poster (2014, October)

Background. Due to recently developed therapies, patients’ life expectancy with CF today is in the early 40s. As a result, medical providers in CF care centers seek not only to improve patients’ health ... [more ▼]

Background. Due to recently developed therapies, patients’ life expectancy with CF today is in the early 40s. As a result, medical providers in CF care centers seek not only to improve patients’ health but also to enhance their quality of life (QOL). QOL as a concept for children, in particular, is fairly new. Accordingly, QOL of school-aged children with CF is relatively under-investigated. In recent years, the role of family contextual variables has received increased attention as predictors of child adjustment to illness. Evidence exists that parenting and parent-child relationship factors are related to children’s emotional development and thus may be life-course determinants in their health. To date, no study has quantitatively investigated parental factors, particularly with respect to paternal variables, associated with the QOL of children with CF. Objective. The study aimed to investigate the relation of parenting stress, family functioning, and fathers’ involvement in the disease’s management to emotional distress and QOL in children with CF. Study design. Using a cross-sectional design, this study recruited families of children with CF from four different CF Centers. Data collection is on going and a full sample of 40 families is expected for this presentation. To date, the study protocol was completed by 18 families. Inclusion criteria for children include: (a) a diagnosis of CF for at least one year; and (b) age 8 to 12 years. Also, both parents must be willing to participate to be included in our sample. Children complete the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC), Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI-2), and Quality of Life Systemic Inventory for Children (QLSI-C). Parents complete the Parenting Stress Index – Short Form (PSI-4-SF), Family Environment Scale (FES), and Dad’s Active Disease Support (DADS) (i.e., a measure of paternal involvement in illness management). Results. With the full sample, we will run multiple regression analyses with STAIC, CDI, PSI-4-SF, FES and DADS as predictors of children’s QOL scores and run moderation and mediation analyses to examine the indirect effect of mothers and fathers’ variables on the child’s QOL. With the sample to date, QOL in children is significantly associated with state anxiety (r=.62; p=.007), trait anxiety (r=.76; p<.001), and depression (r=.77; p=.001). We also found a direct link between the mothers’ parenting stress levels and children’s QOL (r=.51; p=.031), anxiety (r=.49; p=.045), and depression (r=.47; p=.054). Fathers’ parenting stress levels (r=.54; p=.026) and mothers’ evaluation of fathers’ involvement (r=.47; p=.047) each are significantly associated with the mothers’ parenting stress. These results may be suggestive of a potential mediator effect. Conclusion. Information about fathers is underrepresented in pediatric psychology research. However, interest in impact of parental adaptation on children’s adjustment to chronic disease is on the increase. The results of this study are expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of how both parents play a role in the QOL and emotional adjustment of school-aged children with CF. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (3 ULg)
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See detailEmotional distress in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis: using the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation to understand the role of illness perception and coping strategies
Toucheque, Malorie ULg; Stassart, Céline ULg; Duncan, Christina et al

Conference (2015, November 19)

Background: The common sense model of self-regulation (CSM) provides a framework for understanding the connection between emotions, thoughts and behaviors in people experiencing illness. However, most of ... [more ▼]

Background: The common sense model of self-regulation (CSM) provides a framework for understanding the connection between emotions, thoughts and behaviors in people experiencing illness. However, most of model in health psychology, including the CSM, were initially addressed to adult patients. Objective: This study examines the traditional conceptualization of the CSM where coping act as a mediator of the relation between illness perception and emotional distress in a pediatric population with chronic disease, namely Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Method: Using a cross-sectional design, 38 children with CF aged between 8 and 12 years participated in the study. All children were asked to complete: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC), the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI), the Kidcope and the Children’s Illness Perception Questionnaire (CIPQ). A composite score labelled “emotional distress” including scores of anxiety and depressive symptoms were created. Results: Illness perception predicted emotional distress (Timeline: β = .43; t = 2.835; p = .007; Consequences: β = .50; t = 3.429; p = .002; Control: β = .18; t = 1.088; p = .284). As regard with coping strategies, only emotional outburst and distraction predicted emotional distress (emotional outburst: β = .48; t = 3.241; p = .003; distraction: β = .32; t = 2.038; p = .049). However, there were no relation of illness perception subscales with emotional outburst and distraction. Therefore, the mediational role of coping strategies between illness perception and emotional distress could not be tested. Conclusion: Findings did not confirm the original conceptualization of coping as a mediator suggesting that the CSM needs to be adapted when applied with a pediatric population. Even though young children are able to think before acting (i.e. Piaget’s work), future research should explore the possibility that cognitions and actions exist at the same level and can independently impact adjustment outcomes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (7 ULg)
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See detailEmotional facial expression decoding in children high in social anxiety
Blairy, Sylvie ULg; Massin, Anne

Poster (2007, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
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See detailEmotional Facial Expression Recognition and Expressivity in Type I and Type II Alcohol Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; El Hawa, Maya; Duchateau et al

in Journal of Nonverbal Behavior (2014), 38(1), 89-105

Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present ... [more ▼]

Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present study aimed to explore emotional facial expression (EFE) recognition and posed and spontaneous EFE expressivity in male ADs divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology and the impact of their interpersonal relationship quality on the potential nonverbal deficits. Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants took part in an EFE recognition task and an EFE expressivity task that considered personal emotional events (spontaneous expressivity) and EFE in response to a photo or word cue (posed expressivity). Coding was based on judges’ ratings of participants’ emotional facial expressions. Participants additionally completed a questionnaire on interpersonal relationship quality. Results: No difference between the three groups emerged in the EFE recognition task. Type II ADs showed heightened deficits compared with type I ADs in EFE expressivity: Judges perceived less accurate posed EFE in response to a cue word and less intense and positive spontaneous EFE in type II ADs compared to control participants. In addition, type II ADs reported more relationship difficulties compared to both type I ADs and control participants. These interpersonal relationship difficulties were related to some of the EFE expressivity deficits of AD-IIs. Conclusions: This study underlines the important differences between the interpersonal functioning of AD subtypes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (11 ULg)