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See detailGraeco-Egyptian Alchemy in Byzantium
Mertens, Michèle ULg

in Magdalino, Paul; Mavroudi, Maria (Eds.) The Occult Sciences in Byzantium (2006)

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See detailGraft of autologous fibroblasts in gingival tissue in vivo after culture in vitro. Preliminary study on rats.
Simain-Sato, Franklin ULg; Lahmouzi, Jamila ULg; Heinen, Ernst ULg et al

in Journal of Periodontal Research (1999), 34(6), 323-8

Several grafting techniques and guided tissue regeneration techniques (GTR) have been well-developed in periodontal surgery. However, these techniques could induce pain and side effects, such as a ... [more ▼]

Several grafting techniques and guided tissue regeneration techniques (GTR) have been well-developed in periodontal surgery. However, these techniques could induce pain and side effects, such as a gingival recession during the healing period following the therapy. The graft of a small autologous connective tissue, using non-invasive surgical techniques could yield several benefits for the patients. Our preliminary study explores the feasibility of collecting healthy gingival tissues, culturing them in vitro to amplify rat gingival fibroblasts (RGF) and inoculating the obtained cells into autologous rat gingival tissues in vivo. Gingival tissues samples were cultured as explants as described by Freshney et al. and Adolphe. Confluent cells surrounding explants were detached after 7 d of culture from Petri dishes using 0.05% trypsin and designated "first transferred cells" (T1). At the third passage (T3), cells cultured as monolayer were either examined under microscopy--phase contrast, scanning, or transmission electron--or numerated after trypan blue exclusion test. Autologous RGF labelled with fluorochrome were inoculated at the vestibular and palatine site of gingival tissue close to the superior incisors. In this preliminary study, 12 Wistar rats were used; for each, 2 biopsies were dissected and fixed for phase contrast or fluorescence microscopy. On d 1, 3 and 7 after injection in rat gingival tissues, fluorochrome-labelled cells could be detected in all these. [less ▲]

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See detailGraft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Maris, Michael; Sandmaier, Brenda et al

in Blood (2004), 104

We have used a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisting of 2 Gy total body irradiation +/– fludarabine, 30 mg/m²/day x 3 days, to condition elderly or ill patients (pts) with hematological ... [more ▼]

We have used a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisting of 2 Gy total body irradiation +/– fludarabine, 30 mg/m²/day x 3 days, to condition elderly or ill patients (pts) with hematological malignancies for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This approach relies almost exclusively on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects for control of malignancy. Here, we analyzed GVT effects in 322 pts with hematological malignancies given grafts from HLA-matched related (n=192) or unrelated (n=130) donors. Grades I, II, III and IV acute GVHD were seen in 26 (8.1%), 141 (43.8%), 34 (10.6%) and 11 (3.4%) pts, respectively. Extensive chronic GVHD was seen in 181 (56.2%) pts and of these, 64 (19.9%) cases had de novo chronic GVHD. Putative GVT effects were evaluated using time-dependent Cox regression models. Of the 221 pts with measurable disease at HCT, 126 (57%) achieved complete (n=98) or partial (n=28) remissions. Multivariate analysis identified chemosensitivity for B-cell malignancies (p=.02), and tandem autologous/allogeneic HCT (p=.04) as pre-transplant factors associated with higher probabilities of achieving complete remissions (CR) after HCT. After adjusting for these factors, acute GVHD of any grade was not found to be associated with an increased probability of achieving CR. There was a trend for a higher probability of achieving CR in pts with chronic GVHD (p=.07). Progression/relapse was observed in 108 pts. Multivariate analysis identified that lower disease-risk (p=.0004), tandem autologous/allogeneic HCT (p=.02) and adapted Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score at transplant < 3 (p=.002) resulted in significantly decreased risk of progression/relapse. After correcting for these factors, extensive chronic GVHD was associated with a decreased risk of progression/relapse (p=.006). Pts with grade 1 acute GVHD tended to have less progression/relapse (p=.07). Conversely, grade II–IV acute GVHD did not significantly affect the risk of progression/relapse. Nonrelapse mortality was observed in 70 pts. Multivariate analysis showed that lower disease-risk (p=. 001), tandem autologous/allogeneic HCT (p=.002) and CCI score at transplant < 3 (p<.0001) significantly decreased nonrelapse mortality. After adjusting for these variables, grade II (p=.04) and grade III–IV (p<.0001) acute GVHD increased nonrelapse mortality while extensive chronic GVHD did not. The 3-year probability of progression-free survival (PFS) was 38.5%. In multivariate analysis, lower disease-risk (p<.0001), tandem autologous/allogeneic HCT (p=.0008) and CCI score at transplant < 3 (p<.0001) resulted in significantly better PFS. After adjusting for theses variables, grade 1 acute GVHD (p=.02) and chronic extensive GVHD (p=.003) were both associated with significantly better PFS, while grade III–IV acute GVHD (p<.0001) was associated with decreased PFS. In summary, chronic GVHD in pts given nonmyeloablative conditioning was associated with substantial GVT effects which led to improved PFS. Conversely, any potential GVT benefits from grade II–IV acute GVHD were offset by higher nonrelapse mortality resulting in worse PFS. Efforts should be directed at reducing the risk of grade II–IV acute GVHD while allowing de novo chronic GVHD for best PFS after allogeneic HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning. [less ▲]

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See detailGraft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Maris, M. B.; Sandmaier, B. M. et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2005), 23(9), 1993-2003

Purpose We have used a nonmyelorablative conditioning regimen consisting of total-body irradiation (2 Gy) with or without fludarabine (30 mg/m(2)/d for 3 days) for related and unrelated hematopoietic cell ... [more ▼]

Purpose We have used a nonmyelorablative conditioning regimen consisting of total-body irradiation (2 Gy) with or without fludarabine (30 mg/m(2)/d for 3 days) for related and unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with hematologic malignancies who were not candidates for conventional HCT because of age, medical comorbidities, or preceding high-dose HCT. This approach relied on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects for control of malignancy. Patients and Methods We analyzed GVT effects in 322 patients given grafts from HILA-matched related (n = 192) or unrelated donors (n = 130). Results Of the 221 patients with measurable disease at HCT, 126 (57%) achieved complete (n = 98) or partial (n = 28) remissions. In multivariate analysis, there was a higher probability trend of achieving complete remissions in patients with chronic extensive graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, P = .07). One hundred eight patients (34%) relapsed or progressed. In multivariate analysis, achievement of full donor chimerism was associated with a decreased risk of relapse or progression (P = .002). Grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD had no significant impact on the risk of relapse or progression but was associated with increased risk of nonrelapse mortality and decreased probability of progression-free survival (PFS). Conversely, extensive chronic GVHD was associated with decreased risk of relapse or progression (P = .006) and increased probability of PFS (P = .003). Conclusion New approaches aimed at reducing the incidence of grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD might improve survival after allogeneic HCT after nonmyeloablative conditioning. (c) 2005 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafted block complex coacervate core micelles and their effect on protein adsorption on silica and polystyrene
Brzozowska, Agata M.; de Keizer, Arie; Norde, Willem et al

in Colloid and Polymer Science (2010), 288(10/11), 1081-1095

We have studied the formation and the stability of grafted block complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) in solution and the influence of grafted block C3M coatings on the adsorption of the proteins beta ... [more ▼]

We have studied the formation and the stability of grafted block complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) in solution and the influence of grafted block C3M coatings on the adsorption of the proteins beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme. The C3Ms consist of a grafted block copolymer PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) (poly(acrylic acid)-b-poly(acrylate methoxy poly(ethylene oxide)), with a negatively charged PAA block and a neutral PAPEO block and a positively charged homopolymer P2MVPI (poly(N-methyl 2-vinyl pyridinium iodide). In solution, these C3Ms partly disintegrate at salt concentrations between 50 and 100 mM NaCl. Adsorption of C3Ms and proteins has been studied with fixed-angle optical reflectometry, at salt concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mM NaCl. In comparison with the adsorption of PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) alone adsorption of C3Ms significantly increases the amount of PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) on the surface. This results in a higher surface density of PEO chains. The stability of the C3M coatings and their influence on protein adsorption are determined by the composition and the stability of the C3Ms in solution. A C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(43) coating strongly suppresses the adsorption of all proteins on silica and polystyrene. The reduction of protein adsorption is the highest at 100 mM NaCl (> 90%). The adsorbed C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(43) layer is partly removed from the surface upon exposure to an excess of beta-lactoglobulin solution, due to formation of soluble aggregates consisting of beta-lactoglobulin and P2MVPI(43). In contrast, C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(228) which has a fivefold longer cationic block enhances adsorption of the negatively charged proteins on both surfaces at salt concentrations above 1 mM NaCl. A single PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) layer causes only a moderate reduction of protein adsorption. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafted ionomer complexes and their effect on protein adsorption on silica and polysulfone surfaces
Brzozowska, Agata M.; de Keizer, Arie; Detrembleur, Christophe ULg et al

in Colloid and Polymer Science (2010), 288(16/17), 1621-1632

We have studied the formation and the stability of ionomer complexes from grafted copolymers (GICs) in solution and the influence of GIC coatings on the adsorption of the proteins beta-lactoglobulin (beta ... [more ▼]

We have studied the formation and the stability of ionomer complexes from grafted copolymers (GICs) in solution and the influence of GIC coatings on the adsorption of the proteins beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lac), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lysozyme (Lsz) on silica and polysulfone. The GICs consist of the grafted copolymer PAA(28)-co-PAPEO(22) {poly(acrylic acid)-co-poly[acrylate methoxy poly(ethylene oxide)]} with negatively charged AA and neutral APEO groups, and the positively charged homopolymers: P2MVPI(43) [poly(N-methyl 2-vinyl pyridinium iodide)] and PAH center dot HCl(160) [poly(allylamine hydrochloride)]. In solution, these aggregates are characterized by means of dynamic and static light scattering. They appear to be assemblies with hydrodynamic radii of 8 nm (GIC-PAPEO(22)/P2MVPI(43)) and 22 nm (GIC-PAPEO(22)/PAH center dot HCl(160)), respectively. The GICs partly disintegrate in solution at salt concentrations above 10 mM NaCl. Adsorption of GICs and proteins has been studied with fixed angle optical reflectometry at salt concentrations ranging from 1 to 50 mM NaCl. Adsorption of GICs results in high density PEO side chains on the surface. Higher densities were obtained for GICs consisting of PAH center dot HCl(160) (1.6 divided by 1.9 chains/nm(2)) than of P2MVPI(43) (0.6 divided by 1.5 chains/nm(2)). Both GIC coatings strongly suppress adsorption of all proteins on silica (>90%); however, reduction of protein adsorption on polysulfone depends on the composition of the coating and the type of protein. We observed a moderate reduction of beta-lac and Lsz adsorption (>60%). Adsorption of BSA on the GIC-PAPEO(22)/ P2MVPI(43) coating is moderately reduced, but on the GIC-PAPEO(22)/ PAH center dot HCl(160) coating it is enhanced. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafting Information in Scenario Trees: Application to Option Prices
Schyns, Michael ULg; Crama, Yves ULg; Hübner, Georges ULg

E-print/Working paper (2005)

The high level of sophistication in portfolio management modeling techniques often goes along with very large output sensitivity to parameter choices. As a potential solution to this problem, this paper ... [more ▼]

The high level of sophistication in portfolio management modeling techniques often goes along with very large output sensitivity to parameter choices. As a potential solution to this problem, this paper proposes a consistent and flexible methodology to represent the distribution of future values of a portfolio through scenario trees. This methodology relies on the information contained in current option prices in order to generate the probability density function of future returns. This density function can be used, in turn, to generate scenario trees . As an illustration, a tree of scenarios based on S&P500 options is built and then used to compute arbitrage-free option prices. The approach preserves information embedded in options prices and is able to provide very accurate values for out-of-sample options. The high level of numerical accuracy of the framework is reproduced on different samples. The scenario tree approach also provides stable pricing results when confronted with the passage of time. The results derived from our model are comparable to those obtained from Rubinstein’s [1994] methodology, although both models fulfill different objectives. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafting of alkoxyamine end-capped (co)polymers onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes
Lou, Xudong; Detrembleur, Christophe ULg; Sciannamea, Valérie et al

in Polymer (2004), 45(18), 6097-6102

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been successfully modified by polystyrene, poly(epsilon-caprolactone), and their block copolymers by addition reaction of the alkoxyamine-terminated precursors ... [more ▼]

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been successfully modified by polystyrene, poly(epsilon-caprolactone), and their block copolymers by addition reaction of the alkoxyamine-terminated precursors. Polymer-modified MWNTs are easily dispersed in good solvents for the grafted polymer, such as toluene and THF. This observation has been confirmed by TEM analysis. The grafting ratio of polystyrene chains at the surface of MWNTs depends on the polymer molecular weight. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafting of poly[2-(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate] onto polypropylene by reactive blending and antibacterial activity of the copolymer
Thomassin, Jean-Michel ULg; Lenoir, Sandrine ULg; Riga, Johan ULg et al

in Biomacromolecules (2007), 8(4), 1171-1177

To combine low cost, good mechanical properties, and antibacterial activity in one material, a nonquaternized polymeric biocide, i.e., poly[2-(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PTBAEMA), was dispersed ... [more ▼]

To combine low cost, good mechanical properties, and antibacterial activity in one material, a nonquaternized polymeric biocide, i.e., poly[2-(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PTBAEMA), was dispersed within a commodity plastic, i.e., polypropylene (PP). The high immiscibility of the two polymers was tackled by reactive compatibilization and thus by reaction of commercially available maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene with primary amine-end-capped PTBAEMA. This reactive polymethacrylate was synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization with an azide-containing initiator. The azide end group was converted into a primary amine by the Huisgen [3 + 2] cycloaddition of propargylamine. The accordingly formed PP-g-PTBAEMA copolymer was melt dispersed within neat PP and processed as fibers, whose antimicrobial properties were assessed by the viable cell counting method against Escherichia coli. The antibacterial activity was long-lasting as a result of the anchoring of the PTBAEMA chains onto PP, which prevented them from being released from the surface of the fibers. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafting of polystyryl anions onto carbon nanotubes
Lou, Xudong; Koulic, Christian; Pagnoulle, Christian et al

Poster (2003, May 16)

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See detailGraftonite-triphylite-sarcopside intergrowths from the Palermo No. 1 pegmatite (New Hampshire, USA): textures and chemistry
Roda-Robles, Encarnacion ULg; Nizamoff, Jim; Simmons, W. B. et al

in Acta Mineralogica-Petrographica, Abstract series (2010), 6

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See detailGrafts of Meningeal Fibroblasts in Adult Rat Spinal Cord Lesion Promote Axonal Regrowth
Franzen, Rachelle ULg; Martin, Didier ULg; Daloze, A. et al

in Neuroreport (1999), 10(7), 1551-6

We have studied the morphological consequences of implantation into the injured adult rat spinal cord of fibroblasts derived from the meninges overlying the cerebral cortex. Our initial objective was to ... [more ▼]

We have studied the morphological consequences of implantation into the injured adult rat spinal cord of fibroblasts derived from the meninges overlying the cerebral cortex. Our initial objective was to reproduce the well known post-traumatic fibroadhesive scar observed in the clinical situation. One month after implantation, instead of having formed a fibroadhesive scar, fibroblasts had promoted the regeneration of peptidergic axons originating from dorsal root afferents and, to a lesser extent, of supraspinal serotonergic fibers at the periphery of the grafts. Using RT-PCR we were able to identify in cultures of meningeal-derived fibroblasts mRNAs for beta-NGF, NT3, aFGF and bFGF, which suggests that the promoting effect on axonal regeneration of these cells is at least in part due to their capacity to synthesize neurotrophic factors. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafts of Syngenic Cultured, Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion-Derived Schwann Cells to the Injured Spinal Cord of Adult Rats: Preliminary Morphological Studies
Martin, Didier ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Delree, P. et al

in Neuroscience Letters (1991), 124(1), 44-8

Highly enriched cultures of Schwann cells were obtained from adult rat dorsal root ganglia and implanted (5 x 10(5) -9 x 10(5) cells) in the spinal cord of syngenic adult rats at the site of an acute ... [more ▼]

Highly enriched cultures of Schwann cells were obtained from adult rat dorsal root ganglia and implanted (5 x 10(5) -9 x 10(5) cells) in the spinal cord of syngenic adult rats at the site of an acute compression lesion produced by a subdural inflatable microballoon. These autografts survived and invaded the host tissue, reducing central cavitation and astrocytic gliosis. They dramatically promoted ingrowth of axons, the majority of which appeared to come from the dorsal roots as judged by their neuropeptide content. Invasion of the transplants by descending, e.g. aminergic fibers, was negligible at survival times of up to 4 months. Nonetheless, autologous Schwann cells, which are readily available in the host, represent a promising material for grafts into the injured spinal cord. [less ▲]

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See detailGrain boundary effects in bulk colossal magneto resistive (CMR) manganites and manganite/insulator composites: electrical and magnetic properties
Vanderbemden, Philippe ULg; Vertruyen, Bénédicte ULg; Ausloos, Marcel ULg et al

in Journal of Optoelectronics and Advanced Materials [= JOAM] (2009), 11(9), 1115-1121

In the first part of this paper, we discuss the effects of grain boundaries on the properties of bulk colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganites We compare the electrical resistivity and AC magnetic ... [more ▼]

In the first part of this paper, we discuss the effects of grain boundaries on the properties of bulk colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganites We compare the electrical resistivity and AC magnetic susceptibility of perovskite La-Ca-Mn-O samples with the same nominal stoichiometry but differing in their microstructure (i) a single grain sample, (ii) a sample containing two grains and (iii) a polycrystalline sample Emphasis is placed on information that can be deduced from the measurements in each case In the second part of the paper, we report the data measured on composite samples containing a CMR phase (La-Ca-Mn-O) and an insulating phase (Mn3O4) The results are discussed in the framework of percolation theory We show how the grain boundaries affect the electrical properties of these materials, and we highlight the crucial role of geometric (demagnetization) effects on the resistance vs magnetic field measurements [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (24 ULg)