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See detailThe function of the transcription factor Egr1 in zebrafish cartilage development
Dalcq, Julia ULg; Pasque, Vincent; Ramos, Sonia Davila et al

in Developmental Biology (2007, June 01), 306(1), 439-440

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See detailFunction, diversity and therapeutic potential of the N-terminal domain of human chemokine receptors
Szpakowska, Martyna ULg; Fievez, Virginie; Arumugan, Karthik et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2012)

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See detailFunctional amphiphilic and biodegradable copolymers for intravenous vectorization
Van Butsele, Kathy ULg; Jérôme, Robert ULg; Jérôme, Christine ULg

in Polymer (2007), 48

This paper aims at reporting on the design of polymeric drug nanocarriers used in cancer therapy, with a special emphasis on the control of their biodistribution. First, the prominent role of poly ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at reporting on the design of polymeric drug nanocarriers used in cancer therapy, with a special emphasis on the control of their biodistribution. First, the prominent role of poly(ethylene oxide) in the lifetime of nanocarriers circulating in the blood stream is highlighted, and the origin of a passive targeting based on a difference in the anatomy of tumors and normal tissues is discussed. The main body of the review is devoted to the targeting of nanocarriers towards tumors and the underlying concepts. As a rule, either the constitutive polymer is stimuli-responsive and the locus of drug release is where the stimulation occurs, or a ligand endowed with specific recognition is grafted onto the nanocarrier. Finally, the fate of the nanocarrier after drug delivery and the bioelimination of the polymer(s) involved are briefly considered. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional amphiphilic and degradable copolymers for drug delivery systems
Freichels, Hélène ULg; Pourcelle, Vincent; Plapied, Laurence et al

Poster (2008, December 18)

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See detailFunctional Analysis and the Finite Element Method
Stainier, Laurent; Tossings, Patricia ULg

Learning material (2008)

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See detailFunctional analysis of an FLC-LIKE gene in root chicory
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Pieltain, Alexandra ULg; D'Aloia, Maria ULg et al

in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Physiology (2009), 153A(2/Suppl.), 198-199

Vernalization is known to promote flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting the expression of a strong repressor: FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). The recent cloning of an FLC-LIKE gene in sugar beet (Beta ... [more ▼]

Vernalization is known to promote flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting the expression of a strong repressor: FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). The recent cloning of an FLC-LIKE gene in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris; BvFL1) and – here – in root chicory (Cichorium intybus; CiFL1) suggests the conservation of FLC biological function during evolution of eudicots. Hence physiological questions that remain difficult to address in Arabidopsis can be studied in other species. We investigated the correlation between CiFL1 expression and plant-age dependent responsiveness to vernalization. We also studied the effect of post-vernalization growing temperature, which can stabilize or erase the vernalized state. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional analysis of hydrogen photoproduction in respiratory-deficient mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Lecler, Renaud ULg; Godaux, Damien ULg; Vigeolas, Hélène ULg et al

in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (2011), 36

In this paper, mitochondrial mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii defective for respiratory complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), complex III (ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase) and both ... [more ▼]

In this paper, mitochondrial mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii defective for respiratory complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), complex III (ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase) and both complexes I and III were analyzed for H2 photoproduction. Several parameters were followed during the S-deficiency stage and the anaerobic stage leading to H2 photoproduction. At the early aerobic S-deficiency stage, starch and neutral lipids accumulated in all strains but their amount was significantly decreased in mutants compared to wild type. During the H2 photoproduction process, whereas starch content strongly decreased in all strains, neutral lipid amount remained nearly unchanged, suggesting that starch degraded by glycolysis is the preferential substrate for energy production during anaerobiosis. The mutants displayed a decrease in H2 photoproduction correlating to the number of active mitochondrial proton-pumping sites lost in the strains. Our results thus highlight the critical role of oxidative phosphorylation during the first (aerobic) stage of S-starvation when carbon resources are accumulated. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional analysis of the Antirrhinum floral homeotic DEFICIENS gene in vivo and in vitro by using a temperature-sensitive mutant.
Zachgo, S.; Silva, E de A; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

in Development (1995), 121(9), 2861-75

Flowers of the temperature-sensitive DEFICIENS (DEF) mutant, def-101, display sepaloid petals and carpelloid stamens when grown at 26 degrees C, the non-permissive temperature. In contrast, when ... [more ▼]

Flowers of the temperature-sensitive DEFICIENS (DEF) mutant, def-101, display sepaloid petals and carpelloid stamens when grown at 26 degrees C, the non-permissive temperature. In contrast, when cultivated under permissive conditions at 15 degrees C, the morphology of def-101 flowers resembles that of the wild type. Temperature shift experiments during early and late phases of flower development revealed that second and third whorl organ development is differentially sensitive to changes in DEF expression. In addition, early DEF expression seems to control the spatially correct initiation of fourth whorl organ development. Reduction of the def-101 gene dosage differentially affects organogenesis in adjacent whorls: at the lower temperature development of petals in the second whorl and initiation of carpels in the centre of the flower is not affected while third whorl organogenesis follows the mutant (carpelloid) pattern. The possible contribution of accessory factors to organ-specific DEF functions is discussed. In situ analyses of mRNA and protein expression patterns during def-101 flower development at 15 degrees C and at 26 degrees C support previously proposed combinatorial regulatory interactions between the MADS-box proteins DEF and GLOBOSA (GLO), and provide evidence that the autoregulatory control of DEF and GLO expression by the DEF/GLO heterodimer starts after initiation of all organ primordia. Immunolocalisation revealed that both proteins are located in the nucleus. Interestingly, higher growth temperature affects the stability of both the DEF-101 and GLO proteins in vivo. In vitro DNA binding studies suggest that the temperature sensitivity of the def-101 mutant is due to an altered heterodimerisation/DNA-binding capability of the DEF-101 protein, conditioned by the deletion of one amino acid within the K-box, a protein region thought to be involved in protein-protein interaction. In addition, we introduce a mutant allele of GLO, glo-confusa, where insertion of one amino acid impairs the hydrophobic carboxy-terminal region of the MADS-box, but which confers no strong phenotypic changes to the flower. The strong mutant phenotype of flowers of def-101/glo-conf double mutants when grown in the cold represents genetic evidence for heterodimerisation between DEF and GLO in vivo. The potential to dissect structural and functional domains of MADS-box transcription factors is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional analysis of the cell division protein FtsW of Escherichia coli
Pastoret, Soumya; Fraipont, Claudine ULg; den Blaauwen, Tanneke et al

in Journal of Bacteriology (2004), 186(24), 8370-8379

Site-directed mutagenesis experiments combined with fluorescence microscopy shed light on the role of Escherichia coli FtsW, a membrane protein belonging to the SEDS family that is involved in ... [more ▼]

Site-directed mutagenesis experiments combined with fluorescence microscopy shed light on the role of Escherichia coli FtsW, a membrane protein belonging to the SEDS family that is involved in peptidoglycan assembly during cell elongation, division, and sporulation. This essential cell division protein has 10 transmembrane segments (TMSs). It is a late recruit to the division site and is required for subsequent recruitment of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) catalyzing peptide cross-linking. The results allow identification of several domains of the protein with distinct functions. The localization of PBP3 to the septum was found to be dependent on the periplasmic loop located between TMSs 9 and 10. The E240-A249 amphiphilic peptide in the periplasmic loop between TMSs 7 and 8 appears to be a key element in the functioning of FtsW in the septal peptidoglycan assembly machineries. The intracellular loop (containing the R166-FI78 amphiphilic peptide) between TMSs 4 and 5 and Gly 311 in TMS 8 are important components of the amino acid sequence-folding information. [less ▲]

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See detailThe functional analysis of the Mousterian and Micoquian assemblages of Sesselfelsgrotte, Germany. Tool use and Hafting in the European Late Middle Paleolithic
Rots, Veerle ULg

in Quartär : Jahrbuch für Erforschung des Eiszeitalters und seiner Kulturen (2009), 56

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See detailFunctional analysis of yeast bcs1 mutants highlights the role of Bcs1p-specific amino acids in the AAA domain.
Nouet, Cécile ULg; Truan, Gilles; Mathieu, Lise et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2009), 388(2), 252-61

The mitochondrial protein Bcs1p is conserved from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to humans and its C-terminal region exhibits an AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) domain. The absence of ... [more ▼]

The mitochondrial protein Bcs1p is conserved from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to humans and its C-terminal region exhibits an AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) domain. The absence of the yeast Bcs1p leads to an assembly defect of the iron-sulfur protein (ISP) subunit within the mitochondrial respiratory complex III, whereas human point mutations located all along the protein cause various pathologies. We have performed a structure-function analysis of the yeast Bcs1p by randomly generating a collection of respiratory-deficient point mutants. We showed that most mutations are in the C-terminal region of Bcs1p and have localized them on a theoretical three-dimensional model based on the structure of several AAA proteins. The mutations can be grouped into classes according to their respiratory competence and their location on the three-dimensional model. We have further characterized five mutants, each substituting an amino acid conserved in yeast and mammalian Bcs1 proteins but not in other AAA proteins. The effects on respiratory complex assembly and Bcs1p accumulation were analyzed. Intragenic and extragenic compensatory mutations able to restore complex III assembly to the mutants affecting the AAA domain were isolated. Our results bring new insights into the role of specific residues in critical regions that are also conserved in the human Bcs1p. We show that (1) residues located at the junction between the Bcs1p-specific and the AAA domains are important for the activity and stability of the protein and (2) the residue F342 is important for interactions with other partners or substrate proteins. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional analysis of ZNF85 KRAB zinc finger protein, a member of the highly homologous ZNF91 family
Poncelet, Dominique A.; Bellefroid, Eric J.; Bastiaens, P. V. et al

in DNA & Cell Biology (1998), 17(11), 931-43

We previously identified the ZNF85 (HPF4) KRAB zinc finger gene, a member of the human ZNF91 family. Here, we show that the ZNF85 gene is highly expressed in normal adult testis, in seminomas, and in the ... [more ▼]

We previously identified the ZNF85 (HPF4) KRAB zinc finger gene, a member of the human ZNF91 family. Here, we show that the ZNF85 gene is highly expressed in normal adult testis, in seminomas, and in the NT2/D1 teratocarcinoma cell line. Immunocytochemical localization of a panel of beta-Gal/ZNF85 fusion proteins revealed that ZNF85 contains at least one nuclear localization signal located in the spacer region connecting the KRAB domain with the zinc finger repeats. Bacterially expressed ZNF85 zinc finger domain bound strongly and exclusively to DNA in vitro in a zinc-dependent manner. The KRAB(A) domain of the ZNF85 protein and of several other members of the ZNF91 family exhibited repressing activity when tested in Gal4 fusion protein assays. The repression was significantly enhanced by the addition of the KRAB (B) domain, whereas further addition of other conserved regions had no effect. The ZNF85 KRAB(A) and (B) domains in vitro bound several nuclear proteins that might constitute critical cofactors for repression. [less ▲]

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See detailThe functional anatomy of inhibition processes investigated with the Hayling task
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Delfiore, Guy et al

in Neuroimage (2001), 14(2), 258-267

The cortical areas involved in inhibition processes were examined with positron emission tomography (PET). The tasks administered to subjects were an adaptation of the Hayling test. In the first condition ... [more ▼]

The cortical areas involved in inhibition processes were examined with positron emission tomography (PET). The tasks administered to subjects were an adaptation of the Hayling test. In the first condition (response initiation), subjects had to complete sentences with a word clearly suggested by the context, whereas in the second condition (response inhibition), subjects had to produce a word that made no sense in the context of the sentence. Results indicated that the response initiation processes were associated to increases of activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45/47), whereas response inhibition processes led to increases in a network of left prefrontal areas, including the middle (BA 9 and BA 10) and inferior (BA 45) frontal areas. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional anatomy of verbal and visuospatial span tasks in Alzheimer's disease
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (1997), 5(2), 110-118

The aim of the study was to emphasize cerebral regions which subserve the performance of short-term memory tasks in patients with Alzheimer's disease. We correlated scores obtained on span tasks with ... [more ▼]

The aim of the study was to emphasize cerebral regions which subserve the performance of short-term memory tasks in patients with Alzheimer's disease. We correlated scores obtained on span tasks with cerebral metabolism measured at rest with positron emission tomography. Scores obtained on the digit span task correlated with glucose metabolism in a brain area centered on the premotor cortex and extending to the adjacent motor and parietal gyri. There exists some evidence suggesting that this area may subserve the sequential organization of material stored in short-term memory. In a secondary analysis, we also observed significant interregional correlations between left-sided brain areas which are part of the neural network subserving verbal working memory processes in healthy controls. These data suggest that individual performance on verbal span tasks in AD patients may essentially depend on the preservation of their ordination processing capacity. The absence of correlation with prefrontal regions suggests that AD patients might not spontaneously engage central executive resources to reach their maximal span score. For simultaneous visuospatial span task, the performance of patients correlated with posterior brain regions, and not with prefrontal cortices. Hum. Brain Mapping 5:110-118, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional and cooperative interactions between the homeodomain PDX1, Pbx, and Prep1 factors on the somatostatin promoter
Goudet, Ghylène; Delhalle, Sylvie; Biemar, Frédéric et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1999), 274(7), 4067-73

Expression of the somatostatin gene in endocrine pancreatic cells is controlled by several regulatory cis-elements located in the promoter region. Among these, the adjacent UE-A and TSEI elements, located ... [more ▼]

Expression of the somatostatin gene in endocrine pancreatic cells is controlled by several regulatory cis-elements located in the promoter region. Among these, the adjacent UE-A and TSEI elements, located from -113 to -85 relative to the transcription initiation site, function in combination and act as a pancreas-specific mini-enhancer. The TSEI element is recognized by the pancreatic homeodomain factor PDX1. In the present study, we show that the UE-A element binds a heterodimeric complex composed of a Pbx factor and the Prep1 protein, both belonging to the atypical three-amino acid loop extension homeodomain family. Recombinant Pbx1 and Prep1 proteins bind cooperatively to the UE-A site, whereas neither protein can bind this site alone. Transient transfection experiments reveal that both Pbx1 and Prep1 are required to generate a strong transcriptional activation from the UE-A element when this element is inserted close to the TATA box. In contrast, in the context of the intact somatostatin promoter or mini-enhancer, Pbx1 and Prep1 alone have no effect, but they produce a drastic activation when the pancreatic homeodomain factor PDX1 is also coexpressed. Thus, the activity of the somatostatin mini-enhancer is mediated by a cooperative interaction between the Pbx-Prep1 heterodimeric complex and the pancreatic factor PDX1. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional and Evolutionary Analysis of Flatfish Gonadotropin Receptors Reveals Cladal- and Lineage-Level Divergence of the Teleost Glycoprotein Receptor Family
Chauvigné, Francois; Tingaud-Sequeira, Angele; Agulleiro, Maria J et al

in Biology of Reproduction (2010), 82

Pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) act via their cognate glycoprotein hormone receptors (GpHRs), FSH receptor (FSHR), and LH/ choriogonadotropin ... [more ▼]

Pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) act via their cognate glycoprotein hormone receptors (GpHRs), FSH receptor (FSHR), and LH/ choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) to regulate gonad physiology. Here, we show that the flatfish Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) expresses functional isoforms of fshr and lhcgr, but the genomic origin, ligand activation, and tissue distribution of the receptor transcripts are more complex than expected. By integrating the molecular phylogeny of GpHRs with the syntenic loci of vertebrate orthologs, and by subsequently characterizing the physical maps with the phylogeny of flanking genes, we found that vertebrate GpHRs have undergone a divergent evolution. In Teleostei, fshr genes have a common descent and can be classified as fshra, whereas lhcgrb genes exist as alternatively coded genes even in closely related species. Structural analyses of the receptors revealed that Fshra has an elongated ligand-binding domain, containing an extra leucinerich repeat that specifically arose in the Acanthomorpha because of exon duplication. Ectopic expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that sole Fshra responded to piscine Fsh and Lh, whereas Lhcgrba was preferentially activated by its cognate hormone. The expression pattern of sole fshra and lhcgrba in gonads during the reproductive cycle was consistent with earlier observations wherein Fshra regulates ovarian growth and spermatogenesis and Lhcgrb triggers gamete maturation, respectively. However, contrary to observations in other teleosts, fshra was localized exclusively in Sertoli cells of the testis, whereas lhcgrba was expressed in Leydig cells as well as in spermatids. These results demonstrate the presence of alternatively coded lhcgr isoforms (lhcgrba and lhcgrbb) in teleosts and suggest a role of the lhcgrba receptor in the differentiation of spermatids into spermatozoa in Senegalese sole. [less ▲]

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