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See detailExpression of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor alpha in pituitary tumours
Rotondi, S; Modarelli, A; Rostomyan, Liliya ULg et al

in Endocrine Abstracts (2014, May)

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See detailExpression of preprotachykinin-A and neuropeptide-Y messenger RNA in the thymus
Ericsson, Anders; Geenen, Vincent ULg; Robert, François et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (1990), 4

The preprotachykinin-A gene, the common gene of mRNAs encoding both substance-P (SP) and neurokinin- A (NKA), was shown to be expressed in Sprague-Dawley rat thymus by detection of specific mRNA in gel ... [more ▼]

The preprotachykinin-A gene, the common gene of mRNAs encoding both substance-P (SP) and neurokinin- A (NKA), was shown to be expressed in Sprague-Dawley rat thymus by detection of specific mRNA in gel-blot analyses. In situ hybridization revealed dispersed PPT-A-labeled cells in sections from rat thymus, with a concentration of grains over a subpopulation of cells in the thymic medulla. Also, neuropeptide-Y mRNA-expressing cells were found in the rat thymus, primarily in the thymic medulla. Rat thymic extracts contained SP-like immunoreactivity (SP-LI), and the major part of the immunoreactivity coeluted with authentic SP and SP sulfoxide standards. SP-LI was also detected in human thymus, which contained between 0.09-0.88 ng SP-LI/ g wet wt. Evidence for translation of preprotachykinin- A mRNA in the rat thymus was obtained from the demonstration of NKA-LI in thymic cells with an epithelial-like cell morphology. Combined with previous observations on the immunoregulatory roles of tachykinin peptides and the existence of specific receptors on immunocompetent cells, the demonstration of intrathymic synthesis of NKA suggests a role for NKA-LI peptides in T-cell differentiation in the thymus. [less ▲]

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See detailThe expression of prolactin and its cathepsin D-mediated cleavage in the bovine corpus luteum vary with the estrous cycle
Erdmann, S.; Ricken, A.; Merkwitz, C. et al

in American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism (2007), 293(5), 1365-1377

In the corpus luteum (CL), blood vessels develop, stabilize, and regress. This process depends on the ratio of pro-and antiangiogenic factors, which change during the ovarian cycle. The present study ... [more ▼]

In the corpus luteum (CL), blood vessels develop, stabilize, and regress. This process depends on the ratio of pro-and antiangiogenic factors, which change during the ovarian cycle. The present study focuses on the possible roles of 23,000 (23K) prolactin (PRL) in the bovine CL and its antiangiogenic NH2-terminal fragments after extracellular cleavage by cathepsin D (Cath D). PRL RNA and protein were demonstrated in the CL tissue, in luteal endothelial cells, and in steroidogenic cells. Cath D was detected in CL tissue, cell extracts, and corresponding cell supernatants. In the intact CL, 23K PRL levels decreased gradually, whereas Cath D levels concomitantly increased between early and late luteal stages. In vitro, PRL cleavage occurred in the presence of acidified homogenates of CL tissue, cells, and corresponding cell supernatants. Similar fragments were obtained with purified Cath D, and their appearance was inhibited by pepstatin A. The aspartic protease specific substrate MOCAc-GKPILF similar to FRLK(Dnp)-D-R-NH2 was cleaved by CL cell supernatants, providing further evidence for Cath D activity. The 16,000 PRL inhibited proliferation of luteal endothelial cells accompanied by an increase in cleaved caspase-3. In conclusion, 1) the bovine CL is able to produce PRL and to process it into antiangiogenic fragments by Cath D activity and 2) PRL cleavage might mediate angioregression during luteolysis. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of protein encoded by varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 63 in latently infected human ganglionic neurons
Mahalingam, Ravy; Wellish, Mary; Cohrs, Randall et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1996), 93(5), 2122-2124

The ganglionic cell type in which varicellazoster virus (VZV) is latent in humans was analyzed by using antibodies raised against in vitro-expressed VZV open reading frame 63 protein, VZV open reading ... [more ▼]

The ganglionic cell type in which varicellazoster virus (VZV) is latent in humans was analyzed by using antibodies raised against in vitro-expressed VZV open reading frame 63 protein, VZV open reading frame 63 protein was detected exclusively in the cytoplasm of neurons of latently infected human trigeminal and thoracic ganglia. This is, to our knowledge, the first identification of a herpesvirus protein expressed during latency in the human nervous system. [less ▲]

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See detailThe expression of ps2 and c-myc mRNAs are powerful predictors of relapse and death in breast cancers.
Gol-Winkler, R.; Hardy, L.; Autier, P. et al

Conference (1994, September)

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See detailExpression of Psychrophilic Genes in Mesophilic Hosts: Assessment of the Folding State of a Recombinant Alpha-Amylase
Feller, Georges ULg; Le Bussy, O.; Gerday, Charles ULg

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (1998), 64(3), 1163-5

Alpha-Amylase from the antarctic psychrophile Altermonas haloplanktis is synthesized at 0 +/- 2 degrees C by the wild strain. This heat-labile alpha-amylase folds correctly when overexpressed in ... [more ▼]

Alpha-Amylase from the antarctic psychrophile Altermonas haloplanktis is synthesized at 0 +/- 2 degrees C by the wild strain. This heat-labile alpha-amylase folds correctly when overexpressed in Escherichia coli, providing the culture temperature is sufficiently low to avoid irreversible denaturation. In the described expression system, a compromise between enzyme stability and E. coli growth rate is reached at 18 degrees C. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of rabbit globin mRNA injected into fused HeLa cells.
Huez, Georges; Bruck, Claudine; Portetelle, Daniel ULg et al

in Celis, J. E.; Graessmann, A.; Loyter, A. (Eds.) Transfer of Cell Constituents into Eukaryotic Cells (1980)

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See detailExpression of receptors for insulin-like growth factor-I and transforming growth factor-beta in human follicles.
Qu, Jian Ping; GODIN, Pierre-Arnaud ULg; NISOLLE, Michelle ULg et al

in Molecular Human Reproduction (2000), 6(2), 137-45

The in-vitro growth of immature oocytes in early follicles from cryopreserved human ovarian tissues is a new concept in in-vitro fertilization programmes for the treatment of infertile and cancer patients ... [more ▼]

The in-vitro growth of immature oocytes in early follicles from cryopreserved human ovarian tissues is a new concept in in-vitro fertilization programmes for the treatment of infertile and cancer patients. To better understand the regulatory mechanism of follicular development, immunohistochemistry was used to study the expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) type I receptor (IGF-IR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) type I (TβR-I) and type II (TβR-II) receptors in fresh and frozen ovarian tissues from 14 women. Immunoreactivities for IGF-IR and TβR-I were present simultaneously in the oocytes of primordial, pre-antral and antral follicles. Staining for both IGF-IR and TβR-I was also observed in granulosa cells of primordial, pre-antral and antral follicles. IGF-IR and TβR-I also stained in thecal cells of pre-antral and antral follicles. Stromal cells in surrounding ovarian tissue expressed IGF-IR and TβR-I at various follicular stages. Unlike TβR-I, TβR-II was expressed only in the oocytes of primordial and primary follicles, and with weak staining intensity in thecal cells. No significant staining for TβR-II was found in oocytes and granulosa cells of antral follicles. There was no difference in staining patterns for IGF-IR, TβR-I and TβR-II between fresh and frozen ovarian tissues, indicating that cryopreservation might not significantly alter the immunoreactivities of these receptors in frozen ovarian tissue. The results suggest that IGF-I and TGFβ may participate in the regulation of follicular growth by binding to their receptors through an autocrine or paracrine mechanism. IGF-I and TGFβ may be useful in regulating the in-vitro or in-vivo maturation of oocytes not only in later follicles but also very early follicles, from cryopreserved ovarian tissues for clinical use in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of reelin, its receptors and its intracellular signaling protein, Disabled1 in the canary brain: relationships with the song control system.
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Voigt, C.; Boseret, Géraldine ULg et al

in Neuroscience (2008), 153(4), 944-62

Songbirds produce learned vocalizations that are controlled by a specialized network of neural structures, the song control system. Several nuclei in this song control system demonstrate a marked degree ... [more ▼]

Songbirds produce learned vocalizations that are controlled by a specialized network of neural structures, the song control system. Several nuclei in this song control system demonstrate a marked degree of adult seasonal plasticity. Nucleus volume varies seasonally based on changes in cell size or spacing, and in the case of nucleus HVC and area X on the incorporation of new neurons. Reelin, a large glycoprotein defective in reeler mice, is assumed to determine the final location of migrating neurons in the developing brain. In mammals, reelin is also expressed in the adult brain but its functions are less well characterized. We investigated the relationships between the expression of reelin and/or its receptors and the dramatic seasonal plasticity in the canary (Serinus canaria) brain. We detected a broad distribution of the reelin protein, its mRNA and the mRNAs encoding for the reelin receptors (VLDLR and ApoER2) as well as for its intracellular signaling protein, Disabled1. These different mRNAs and proteins did not display the same neuroanatomical distribution and were not clearly associated, in an exclusive manner, with telencephalic brain areas that incorporate new neurons in adulthood. Song control nuclei were associated with a particular specialized expression of reelin and its mRNA, with the reelin signal being either denser or lighter in the song nucleus than in the surrounding tissue. The density of reelin-immunoreactive structures did not seem to be affected by 4 weeks of treatment with exogenous testosterone. These observations do not provide conclusive evidence that reelin plays a prominent role in the positioning of new neurons in the adult canary brain but call for additional work on this protein analyzing its expression comparatively during development and in adulthood with a better temporal resolution at critical points in the reproductive cycle when brain plasticity is known to occur. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of several viral proteins during the varicella-zoster virus infectious cycle
Debrus, S.; Kinchington, P. R.; Piette, Jacques ULg et al

Conference (1995)

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See detailExpression of sexual ornaments in a polymorphic species: phenotypic variation in response to environmental risk
Winandy, Laurane ULg; Denoël, Mathieu ULg

in Journal of Evolutionary Biology (in press)

Secondary sexual traits may evolve under the antagonistic context of sexual and natural selection. In some polymorphic species, these traits are only expressed during the breeding period and are ... [more ▼]

Secondary sexual traits may evolve under the antagonistic context of sexual and natural selection. In some polymorphic species, these traits are only expressed during the breeding period and are differently expressed in alternative phenotypes. However, it is unknown whether such phenotypes exhibit phenotypic plasticity of seasonal ornamentations in response to environmental pressures such as in the presence of fish (predation risk). This is an important question to understand the evolution of polyphenisms. We used facultative paedomorphosis in newts as a model system because it involves the coexistence of paedomorphs that retain gills in the adult stage with metamorphs that have undergone metamorphosis, but also because newts exhibit seasonal sexual traits. Our aim was therefore to determine the influence of fish on the development of seasonal ornamentation in the two phenotypes of the palmate newt (Lissotriton helveticus). During the entire newt breeding period, we assessed the importance of phenotype and fish presence with an information-theoretic approach. Our results showed that paedomorphs presented much less developed ornamentation than metamorphs and those ornamentations varied over time. Fish inhibited the development of sexual traits but differently between phenotypes: in contrast to metamorphs, paedomorphs lack the phenotypic plasticity of sexual traits to environmental risk. This study points out that internal and external parameters act in complex ways in the expression of seasonal sexual ornamentations and that similar environmental pressure can induce a contrasted evolution in alternative phenotypes. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of somatostatin receptor SST4 in human placenta and absence of octreotide effect on human placental growth hormone concentration during pregnancy.
Caron, Philippe; Buscail, Louis; Beckers, Albert ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1997), 82(11), 3771-3776

In pregnancy, the human placenta GH acts as a growth-promoting hormone and appears to be the main stimulator of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) secretion. In a woman with a TSH-secreting macroadenoma ... [more ▼]

In pregnancy, the human placenta GH acts as a growth-promoting hormone and appears to be the main stimulator of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) secretion. In a woman with a TSH-secreting macroadenoma, successful treatment with the somatostatin analog octreotide was conducted during the first month and the second half of pregnancy without side-effects on placental and fetal development. As observed in normal pregnancy, both serum placental GH and IGF-I levels increased throughout pregnancy and dropped sharply after delivery. In placental membranes from both treated and healthy untreated patients, we demonstrated the presence of high affinity binding sites for somatostatin-14 (Kd, 4.6 and 5.3 nmol/L; binding capacity, 1.53 and 1.35 pmol/mg protein, respectively). These receptors displayed low affinity for octreotide (IC50, 1.2-2 mumol/L), suggesting the presence of SST1 and/or SST4 receptors. We found that messenger ribonucleic acids of these two subtypes were expressed in both human placental tissue and purified human cytotrophoblast cells. Finally, the SST1-selective analog, des-AA1,2,5[D-Trp8,IAmp9]S-14 had low affinity for placental somatostatin receptors. These results argue in favor of the presence of the SST4 subtype in human placenta. At the doses administered, octreotide did not bind to placental somatostatin receptors. Our results may explain the absence of changes in both human placental GH and IGF-I concentrations that we observed during octreotide treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 5 in human prolactinomas
Baillet, L.; Ronci, N.; Epelbaum, J. et al

in 81st Annual Meeting of the Endocrine society - Abstract book (1999)

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See detailExpression of some model plant embryogenesis genes in Phaseolus ovules
Silué, S.; Jacquemin, J. M.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg

in Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report (2007), 50

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See detailExpression of specific pathways in the inflamed synovial membrane of osteoarthritis patient: Identification of new potential key intermediates
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012, April), 20(Supplement 1), 56

Purpose: Synovitis is a key factor in osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology, contributing to both patient symptoms and disease progression. In this study, using an original methodology comparing normal ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Synovitis is a key factor in osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology, contributing to both patient symptoms and disease progression. In this study, using an original methodology comparing normal/reactive (N/R) and inflammatory (I) synovial membranes zones, we investigated the gene expression profiles of synovial cells from these areas and identified differentially regulated pathways. <br />Methods: Synovial cells (SC) were isolated from OA synovial specimens obtained from 12 patients undergoing knee replacement. The inflammatory status of the synovial membrane was characterized by the surgeon according to macroscopic criteria including the synovial vascularization, the villi formation and the hypertrophic aspect of the tissue. At the surgery time, the synovial membrane was dissected and biopsies from N/R and I areas cultured separately for a period of 7 days. Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy Mini Kit. RNA purity and quality were evaluated using the Experion RNA StdSens Analysis kit (Bio-rad Laboratories). Gene expression profiling between N/R and I areas was performed using Illumina’s multi-sample format Human HT-12 BeadChip (Illumina Inc.). Differential analysis was performed with the BRB array tools software. Class Comparison test between N/R and I areas was based on paired t-test where N/R and I were paired for each patient. The biological relevance of up- and down-regulated genes was analyses with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Ingenuity® Systems). Western blot was performed to confirm certain intermediate expression. <br />Results: From among 47000 probes, 17500 were filtered out. Probes with a p-value below than 0.005 were chosen and classified as up- or down-regulated ones. By this way, 896 differentially expressed genes between N/R and I zones were identified. Among these, 576 genes were upregulated (I/NR > 1.5) and 320 downregulated (I/NR < 0.75). With Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, a significant number of the top ranking differentially expressed genes were identified as inflammatory, Wnt and angiogenic pathways. Interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL5, CXCL6, CXCL16) and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) were identified as the most upregulated in I zones in the inflammatory pathway. Interestingly, the alarmin S100A9 was found strongly upregulated in this pathway. Wnt5A and LRP (Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein) 5 were upregulated whereas FZD (Frizzled homolog) 2 and DKK (dickkopf homolog) 3 were downregulated in the Wnt signaling pathway. Finally, stanniocalcin (STC)-1, an intermediate in angiogenesis was identified as the most upregulated gene in I zones compared to N/R zones. This difference of expression was confirmed at the protein level. <br />Conclusions: Using a unique culture system, this study is the first to identify different expression pattern between two areas of synovial membrane from the same OA patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis, i.e. inflammation, Wnt and angiogenesis. This analysis also provided interesting information regarding new potent intermediates as S100A9 and STC-1. They could be potential targets for chondroitin sulfate, one of the most used molecules in the management of OA. New experiments are being perfomed at the moment to elucidate the potential effect of this molecule on these specific differentially expressed genes in the same culture system. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Stromelysin-3 in the Human Placenta and Placental Bed
Maquoi, Erik ULg; Polette, M.; Nawrocki, B. et al

in Placenta (1997), 18(4), 277-85

Human placentation is mediated by fetal trophoblastic cells which penetrate into the decidualized uterine endometrium. Trophoblast invasion requires the precisely regulated secretion of specific ... [more ▼]

Human placentation is mediated by fetal trophoblastic cells which penetrate into the decidualized uterine endometrium. Trophoblast invasion requires the precisely regulated secretion of specific proteinases able to degrade the endometrial basement membranes and extracellular matrix. To document further the involvement of these proteinases during human placentation, we evaluated in vivo the expression of stromelysin-3, a member of the metalloproteinase family, during the first and third trimesters of pregnancy, by means of immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis. Human extravillous trophoblasts invading the maternal decidua produced stromelysin-3 during both, the first and third trimesters of pregnancy, but to a lesser extent during the latter. In floating villi, stromelysin-3 expression was restricted to the syncytiotrophoblasts that line intervillous vascular spaces. In conclusion, stromelysin-3 is expressed by differentiated, non-proliferative villous and extravillous trophoblastic cells in early and late placental beds and villi, and its pattern of expression evolves during pregnancy. Our observations suggest that stromelysin-3 could play a role in human placentation. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of SV2 isoforms during rodent brain development
Crevecoeur, Julie; Foerch, P; Doupagne, Mélissa et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (3 ULg)