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See detailFrom a New-World Poetics to a New-World Vision: African America in the Works of Edouard Glissant and Caryl Phillips
Ledent, Bénédicte ULg

in Commonwealth : Essays and Studies (1999), 21(2), 29-36

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See detailFrom a source to a sink: the role of biological activities on atmospheric CO2 exchange along the river-ocean continuum
Gypens, N; Passy, P; Lancelot, C et al

Poster (2013, April 07)

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See detailFrom Acadiana with Love - Laisse les Bons Temps Rouler
Sacré, Robert ULg

Article for general public (1996)

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See detailFrom Actor Network Theory to Risk Theory, The case of Coprosain
Stassart, Pierre M ULg

Scientific conference (2000)

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See detailFrom Alexander to the Theoi Adelphoi: Foundation and Legitimation of a Dynasty
Caneva, Stefano ULg

Book published by Peeters (in press)

This book provides a cultural and social history of the rise and legitimation of the concept of dynastic continuity in the early history of the Ptolemaic Empire. The scope of the study is therefore ... [more ▼]

This book provides a cultural and social history of the rise and legitimation of the concept of dynastic continuity in the early history of the Ptolemaic Empire. The scope of the study is therefore neither to provide a general overview of third-century Ptolemaic history, nor to discuss in detail the administrative and economic structures of the Ptolemaic state. Rather, its purpose is to investigate the ways by which the first Ptolemies negotiated and constructed a representation of their power as a dynastic house aspiring to universal dominion, protected by the gods and legitimately continuing the heritage of the Macedonian and Egyptian monarchies. It is argued that they managed to do so by operating within different socio-cultural and ethnic milieus and by pursuing their strategies on a two-fold level: on the one hand, by continuously reshaping the relationship between the present events of the ruling house and its historical and mythical past, so as to adapt it to new political and cultural agendas; on the other hand, by shifting the border between the spheres of human and divine power in order to ensure themselves the legitimacy and loyalty stemming from religious thought and practice. Discussed evidence comprises Greek and Egyptian sources, literary and documentary texts, iconographic and archaeological evidence from the Macedonian conquest of Egypt under Alexander to the ascension of Ptolemy III Euergetes. Whenever possible, a new, encompassing evaluation of old evidence has gained new impetus from the intensive analysis of newly published sources. Secondly, the complex cultural and social factors operating in the construction and legitimation of the Ptolemaic dynasty have been discussed by drawing on the contribution of up-to-date scholarship in cultural and religious history as well as in sociology. The rooting of Ptolemaic power in Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean is studied as the movement from the immediate but unstable right of conquest established by Alexander, and subsequently claimed by the satrap Ptolemy, to the development of a mature and coherent system of power practices and representations. The structure of the book is meant to provide readers with a chronological and thematic discussion ranging from Alexander’s conquest of Egypt to the first years of Ptolemy III. However, the six chapters that constitute this study can also be read separately as they are conceived as the monographic treatment of major moments or aspects of the cultural, political, and religious history of the early Hellenistic period. Chapter 1 deals with the premises of Ptolemaic power in Egypt by focusing on the time of Alexander’s conquest. The implications of Alexander’s sonship to Zeus Ammon in propaganda and in religion are reviewed by drawing attention to the plurality of audiences (Macedonians, Greeks, Egyptians) for which this motif was conceived and used. Chapter 2 discusses the conflicting patterns of legitimation in the age of the Successors and how Ptolemy exploited them in his rise from satrap to king. Some seminal moments of Ptolemy’s career are re-examined: the acquisition of Alexander’s corpse as a source of embodied legitimacy; the interactions between the leader and pre-existing Macedonian and Egyptian elites as they appear in assembly scenes of Greek historiography and in the hieroglyphic Satrap stele; Ptolemy’s help to the Rhodians against Antigonus and Demetrius and the entanglement between royal charisma and religious honours. Chapter 3 focuses on the figure of Dionysus in Ptolemaic religion and culture from a twofold perspective. Firstly, the chapter provides an innovative analysis of the religious and ideological role of Dionysus in Ptolemy II’s Alexandrian procession described by Callixeinus of Rhodes. Secondly, it aims at offering a contribution for a reappraisal of the figure of Dionysus, of his cults and of the role of his figure within the larger context of the Ptolemaic Empire in the third century BC. Chapter 4 discusses the patterns of divinization of Arsinoe II within the royal couple through the most complete documentary dossier collected thus far on the subject. Rather than constituting the aim of the research, the debate concerning the chronology of Arsinoe’s death and divinization has provided the rough framework for a new investigation of how the image of a solid royal couple was invented and spread in religious life and in propaganda. Diachronic developments in the configurations of the dynastic couple are traced through Greek and Egyptian evidence and discussed in relation to the changing of political agendas during the reign of Ptolemy II. Chapter 5 studies the contribution of Ptolemy III to the construction of Ptolemaic dynastic continuity through old and new evidence, notably by providing fresh observations concerning the recently published decree of Alexandria (243 BC) for the understanding of Ptolemaic royal festivals in general and, more in particular, for the history of the festival Ptolemaia in the second half of the 3rd century BC. Chapter 6 breaks with chronological continuity to trace, through literary and documentary evidence from the Roman period, the development of the tradition envisaging Alexander’s body as a talismanic relic protecting the city of Alexandria. The purpose of this epilogue is to provide a methodological essay of interpretation of cultural traditions in the longue durée, when patterns of continuity developed under the Ptolemies were separated from their original context of diffusion and consequently were re-used to shape the civic identity of Alexandria within the new and broader framework of the Roman Empire. Although focus on the construction of a dynasty as a sequence of legitimate, kindred holders of monarchic power makes Ptolemaic kings and queens the central object of this study, it is argued that sovereigns cannot be considered as the sole holders of the initiative in the political, ideological and religious processes relating to the construction of royal and dynastic imagery. On the contrary, it appears that social agents other than the holders of supreme leadership not only reacted to top-down stimulation, but they also constructed, for their own use, representations of the monarchs that interacted with the message issued by the central power. From this perspective, therefore, dynastic continuity results from the intertextual combination of a variety of ideological and religious motifs stemming from different agents and occasions of communication. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom an architectural sketch to feasible structural systems
Mora, Rodrigo; Juchmes, Roland ULg; Rivard, Hugues et al

in Gero, John, S.; Goel, Ashok K. (Eds.) Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Design Computing and Cognition (2006)

The goal of this research is to propose an integrated approach to incorporate structural engineering concerns into architectural schematic designs for timely and well-informed decision making. This is ... [more ▼]

The goal of this research is to propose an integrated approach to incorporate structural engineering concerns into architectural schematic designs for timely and well-informed decision making. This is done through a platform that is based on two software prototypes, EsQUIsE for capturing and interpreting architectural sketches, and StAr for assisting engineers during conceptual structural design. An integrated information model is provided for communication. Given the dissimilar “quality” of the information managed by both prototypes, sketch interpretation mechanisms are also required to “tune-up” communications for bringing the sketch to a precise structural engineering definition. As a result, the engineer can propose feasible structural systems earlier than usual. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom an architectural sketch to its semantic representation
Leclercq, Pierre ULg

in International Journal of Construction Information Technology (1997), 4(2), 67-84

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See detailFrom armchair to wheelchair: How patients with a locked-in syndrome integrate bodily changes in experienced identity.
Nizzi, M. C.; Demertzi, Athina ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Consciousness & Cognition (2011)

Different sort of people are interested in personal identity. Philosophers frequently ask what it takes to remain oneself. Caregivers imagine their patients' experience. But both philosophers and ... [more ▼]

Different sort of people are interested in personal identity. Philosophers frequently ask what it takes to remain oneself. Caregivers imagine their patients' experience. But both philosophers and caregivers think from the armchair: they can only make assumptions about what it would be like to wake up with massive bodily changes. Patients with a locked-in syndrome (LIS) suffer a full body paralysis without cognitive impairment. They can tell us what it is like. Forty-four chronic LIS patients and 20 age-matched healthy medical professionals answered a 15-items questionnaire targeting: (A) global evaluation of identity, (B) body representation and (C) experienced meaning in life. In patients, self-reported identity was correlated with B and C. Patients differed with controls in C. These results suggest that the paralyzed body remains a strong component of patients' experienced identity, that patients can adjust to objectives changes perceived as meaningful and that caregivers fail in predicting patients' experience. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom ballistic to diffusive regimes in heat transport at nano-scales
Lebon, Georgy ULg; Grmela, Miroslav; Dubois, Charles

in Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences. Série II, Mécanique, Physique, Chimie, Sciences de l'Univers, Sciences de la Terre (2011), 339

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See detailFrom bare Ge nanowire to Ge/Si core/shell nanowires: a first-principles study
Pekoz, R.; Raty, Jean-Yves ULg

in Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics (2009), 80(15), 1554327-15543271554327

Germanium/Germanium-Silicon core/shell nanowires are expected to play an important role in future electronic devices. We use first-principles plane-wave calculations within density-functional theory in ... [more ▼]

Germanium/Germanium-Silicon core/shell nanowires are expected to play an important role in future electronic devices. We use first-principles plane-wave calculations within density-functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation to investigate the structural and electronic properties of bare and H-passivated Ge nanowires and core/shell Ge/Ge-Si, Ge/Si, and Si/Ge nanowires. The diameters of the nanowires considered are in the range of 0.6-2.9 nm and oriented along [110] and [111] directions. The diameter, the surface passivation, and the substitutional effects on the binding energy, band structure, and effective mass are extensively investigated considering the relative contribution of quantum confinement and surface effects. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom Basal Ganglia to Motoneurons. Probable Involvement of Pathways Relaying in the Medulla
Delwaide, P. J.; Pepin, J. L.; Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULg

in Battistin, L.; Scarlato, G.; Caraceni, T. (Eds.) et al Advances in Neurology. Volume 69 (1996)

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See detailFrom Bio to Nano: Learning From The Past to Shape the Future of Technology Assessment
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Fallon, Catherine ULg; Thoreau, François ULg et al

Conference (2008, October 12)

In many Western countries over the last 35 years, the quest for more scientific governance on <br />crucial technological issues led to a broadening of the political world’s sphere of competences. <br ... [more ▼]

In many Western countries over the last 35 years, the quest for more scientific governance on <br />crucial technological issues led to a broadening of the political world’s sphere of competences. <br />Indeed, various countries decided that dealing with global, invisible, irreversible and irreparable <br />risks had to be handled by an appropriate tool of management of technological innovations. So the <br />usefulness to institutionalize parliamentary Technology Assessment (PTA) offices emerged. <br />Nowadays, PTA is an instrument particularly suitable to study the new shape of science and <br />society’s interface and it represents a remarkable attempt to reform the institutional settings of <br />innovation. <br />However, while the overall uncertainty surrounding science and technology has been used by public <br />actors like parliamentarians or ministers in the past to legitimize a first generation of PTAs, the <br />emergence of a second generation in the 1990’s – centred on the constructive, interactive or <br />participatory TA approches – emphazises the co-evolution of technology and society rather than the <br />former linear determinist rationale. In this context, the STS community of scholars is increasingly <br />called upon by the public authorities to provide a “professional service role” (RIP, 1994), that is to <br />say to take a step into action out of the border of their intellectual engagement. <br />Then, we suggest to compare two successive periods by looking at the institutional management of <br />two distinct-but-complementary technological issues: biotechnology and nanotechnology. The <br />former has been taken into account by public actors at a time when the second generation of PTAs <br />was not yet rooted in the political practices. Thus, the management of the public debate related to <br />biotechnology has been characterized by a lack of sensitive, fruitful and interactive communication <br />between the stakeholders involved in the TA process, while the first applications were already being <br />commercialized. On the other hand, the latter is currently being tackled at a moment when the social <br />shaping of technology is widely acknowledged as well as the STS community may be invited to <br />pass from observation to participation in the political sphere. Given the uncertainty and complexity <br />encircling nanotechnology as well as its huge potential in many interconnected disciplinary fields, <br />the need to avoid the pitfall of the biotechnology’s experience is commonly accepted. <br />We offer to take nanotechnology as one of the most challenging technological issue to look beyond <br />the biotechnology’s roadblock and to show in which proportion the same scenario is reasonably <br />thinkable today, in order to spotlight whether we have learnt from the past in considering what is <br />1 <br />sometimes called “a new industrial revolution”. <br />We will raise some research questions like: how different are current TA practices as compared to <br />former ones? Are there new regimes emerging? Given the current technological convergence, how <br />complicated would it be to deal with NBIC technologies if we missed the point with biotechnology <br />alone? How suitable is PTA to engage in such interdisciplinary issues? Are we assisting the <br />emergence of a third PTA generation around the growing role of the STS community? How does <br />this scientific community dialogue with the historians of science who analyzed the earlier industrial <br />revolutions? [less ▲]

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See detailFrom biological signals to music
Arslan, B.; Brouse, A.; Castet, J. et al

in Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Enactive Interfaces Enactive05 (2005)

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See detailFrom biologicalmembranes to biomimetic model membranes
Eeman, Marc; Deleu, Magali ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2010), 14

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See detailFrom biotemporality to nootemporality : towards an integrative and comparative view of time in behavior
Richelle, Marc ULg; Lejeune, Helga ULg; Perikel, J. J. et al

in Michon, John A.; Jackson, Janet L. (Eds.) Time, mind and behavior (1985)

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