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Peer Reviewed
See detailEstimation of (co)variances of test day yields for first lactation Holsteins in the United States
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Tijani, A.; Wiggans, G. R. et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (1999), 82(1), 2251-22514

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (3 ULg)
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See detailEstimation of a general parametric location in censored regression
Heuchenne, Cédric ULg; Van Keilegom, Ingrid

in Exploring research frontiers in contemporary statistics and econometrics - A Festschrift for Léopold Simar (2012)

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See detailEstimation of actual evapotranspiration at large watershed scale in Africa using NOAA-AVHRR surface temperature and NDVI.
Touré, Souleymane; Tychon, Bernard ULg

in 1997 Meteorological satellite data users' conference Proceedings (1997)

To estimate actual evapotranspiration on regional scale, seven subcatchments were choosen on fleuve Niger catchment where we have selected stations for representative meteorological measurements ... [more ▼]

To estimate actual evapotranspiration on regional scale, seven subcatchments were choosen on fleuve Niger catchment where we have selected stations for representative meteorological measurements. Precipitation values are spatially represented by using Thiessen polygons and Kriging methods and, based on water balance equation, we deduce the actual evapotranspiration term.The goal (objective) of this study is to deduce from the water balance equation the evapotranspiration term, to correlate remote sensing indicators (surface temperature and NDVI) and evapotranspiration data and characterise factors that affect this correlation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 ULg)
See detailEstimation of additive and dominance genetic variances with Method R
Druet, Tom ULg

Doctoral thesis (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (16 ULg)
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See detailEstimation of additive and nonadditive genetic variances in Hereford, Gelbvieh, and Charolais by Method R.
Duangjinda, M.; Bertrand, K.; Misztal, I. et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2001), 79(12), 2997-3001

Parameters for direct and maternal dominance were estimated in models that included non-additive genetic effects. The analyses used weaning weight records adjusted for age of dam from populations of ... [more ▼]

Parameters for direct and maternal dominance were estimated in models that included non-additive genetic effects. The analyses used weaning weight records adjusted for age of dam from populations of Canadian Hereford (n = 467,814), American Gelbvieh (n = 501,552), and American Charolais (n = 314,552). Method R estimates of direct additive genetic, maternal additive genetic, permanent maternal environment, direct dominance, and maternal dominance variances as a proportion of the total variance were 23, 12, 13, 19, and 14% in Hereford; 27, 7, 10, 18, and 2% in Gelbvieh; and 34, 15, 15, 23, and 2% in Charolais. The correlations between direct and maternal additive genetic effects were -0.30, -0.23, and -0.47 in Hereford, Gelbvieh, and Charolais, respectively. The correlations between direct and maternal dominance were -0.38, -0.02, and -0.04 in Hereford, Gelbvieh, and Charolais, respectively. Estimates of inbreeding depression were -0.20, -0.18, and -0.13 kg per 1% of inbreeding for Hereford, Gelbvieh, and Charolais, respectively. Estimates of the maternal inbreeding depression were -0.01, -0.02, and -0.02 kg, respectively. The high ratio of direct dominance to additive genetic variances provided some evidence that direct dominance effects should be considered in beef cattle evaluation. However, maternal dominance effects seemed to be important only for Hereford cattle. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of air quality degradation due to Saharan dust at Nouakchott, Mauritania, from horizontal visibility data
Ozer, Pierre ULg; Laghdaf, MBOM; Lemine, S. O. M. et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2007), 178(1-4), 79-87

It is now irrefutable that air pollution caused by large amounts of Total Suspended Particulates (TSP) and respiratory particulates or Particulate Matter less than 10 mu m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10 ... [more ▼]

It is now irrefutable that air pollution caused by large amounts of Total Suspended Particulates (TSP) and respiratory particulates or Particulate Matter less than 10 mu m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) has numerous undesired consequences on human health. Air quality degradation far from the African continent, in the US and in Europe, caused by high concentrations of African dust, is seen as a major threat even though most of these countries are very distant from the Sahara. Surprisingly, no estimates of TSP or PM10 levels near the Saharan dust source are available. Based on horizontal visibility observations which are reduced by the presence of dust in the atmosphere, TSP and PM10 levels are estimated throughout the year 2000 at Nouakchott-Airport, Mauritania, using relations found in the literature. It appears that concentrations of particles are significant both in terms magnitude and frequency, as the 24-hour PM10 thresholds established by the US EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standards and the EU Limits Values for Air Quality were exceeded 86 and 137 times, respectively. The average annual concentration is far above air quality standards and estimated at 159 mu g m(-3) for TSP and 108 mu g m(-3) for PM10. These very high particulate levels are likely to represent an important public health hazard and should be considered as a major environmental risk. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (8 ULg)
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See detailEstimation of Airline Itinerary Choice Models Using Disaggregate Ticket Data
Lurkin, Virginie ULg; Garrow, Laurie A.; Higgins, Matthew J. et al

in 55th AGIFORS Annual Proceedings 2015 (2015, August 29)

Airline itinerary choice models support many multi-million dollar decisions, i.e., they are used to evaluate potential route schedules. Classic models suffer from major limitations, most notably they use ... [more ▼]

Airline itinerary choice models support many multi-million dollar decisions, i.e., they are used to evaluate potential route schedules. Classic models suffer from major limitations, most notably they use average fare information but to not correct for price endogeneity. We use a novel database of airline tickets to estimate itinerary choice models using detailed fare data and compare these to classic itinerary choice models that use aggregate fare information but correct for price endogeneity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (5 ULg)
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See detailEstimation of biochemical network parameter distributions in cell populations
Hasenauer, J; Waldherr, S; Schliemann, Monica ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailEstimation of bioreactor efficiency through structured hydrodynamic modeling case study of a Pichia pastoris fed-batch process.
Delvigne, Frank ULg; El Mejdoub, Thami ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2005), 121-124

In this article, two theories are unified to investigate the effect of hydrodynamics on a specific bioprocess: the network-of-zones (NOZ) hydrodynamic structured modeling approach (developed by several ... [more ▼]

In this article, two theories are unified to investigate the effect of hydrodynamics on a specific bioprocess: the network-of-zones (NOZ) hydrodynamic structured modeling approach (developed by several researchers but applied to only a few bioprocesses) and the effectiveness factor eta approach. Two process scales were investigated (20 and 500 L), and for each, hydrodynamics were quantified using an NOZ validated by homogeneity time measurements. Several impeller combinations inducing quite different hydrodynamics were tested at the 20-L scale. After this step, effectiveness factors were determined for each fermentation run. To achieve this, a perfectly mixed microbial kinetic model was evaluated by using simple Monod kinetics with a fed-batch mass balance. This methodology permitted determination of the effectiveness factor with more accuracy because of the relation with the perfect case deduced from the Monod kinetics. It appeared that for the small scale, eta decreased until reaching a value of approx 0.7 (30% from the ideal case) for the three impeller systems investigated. However, stirring systems that include hydrofoils seemed to maintain higher effectiveness factors during the course of the fermentation. This effect can be attributed to oxygen transfer performance or to homogenization efficiency exhibited by the hydrofoils. To distinguish the oxygen transfer from the homogenization component of the effectiveness factor, these phenomena were analyzed separately. After determining the evolution of etaO2 linked to oxygen transfer for each of the fermentation runs, the NOZ model was employed to quantify substrate gradient appearance. After this step, another effectiveness factor, etamix, related to mixing was defined. Consequently, it is possible to distinguish the relative importance of the mixing effect and oxygen transfer on a given bioprocess. The results have highlighted an important scale effect on the bioprocess that can be analyzed using the NOZ model. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of breeding values of Belgian trotters in animal model
Leroy, Pascal ULg; Kafidi, N.; Bassleer, E.

(1988)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
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See detailEstimation of breeding values of Belgian trotters using an animal model
Leroy, Pascal ULg

in State of breeding evaluation in trotters (1988)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (6 ULg)
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See detailEstimation of canine leishmania infection prevalence in six cities of the algerian littoral zone using a bayesian approach
Amel, A; Abatih, E; Speybroeck, N et al

in PLoS ONE (2015), 10(3),

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
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See detailEstimation of degree-days for different climatic zones of North-East India
Borah, Pallavi; Singh, Manoj Kumar ULg; Mahapatra, Sadhan

in Sustainable Cities and Society (2015), 14

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (10 ULg)
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See detailEstimation of diet digestibility and intake by grazing ruminants through near infrared reflectance spectroscopy analysis of faeces. Application in various contexts of livestock production
Decruyenaere, Virginie ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Grazing is the most economical feeding scheme for ruminants. Grazing management, however, is often difficult for breeders, particularly because of a lack of knowledge about grass availability and quality ... [more ▼]

Grazing is the most economical feeding scheme for ruminants. Grazing management, however, is often difficult for breeders, particularly because of a lack of knowledge about grass availability and quality. There are methods for assessing the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grass, but they are difficult to apply in the case of grazing ruminants. Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) is based on the absorption of infrared light by organic matters to provide NIRS spectra. These NIRS spectra can be correlated with the chemical or biological composition of samples in order to develop calibrations that can be used as predictive models. The primary objective of this PhD thesis was to study the potential of NIRS applied to faeces (FNIRS) in order to predict the characteristics of the diets of grazing herbivores. The particular focus was on the in vivo organic matter digestibility, voluntary intake and botanical composition of ingested diets. The main results of the study show that FNIRS has great portential for estimating in vivo digestibility and voluntary intake by grazing ruminants and that faeces are a good indicator of ingested diets. Based on both large or small and varied databases, the results suggest that FNIRS spectral libraries could be developed for characterising ruminant feed intake. The accuracy of the FNIRS models in estimating in vivo digestibility and voluntary intake is similar to or better than that of other methods usually used to assess these parameters. FNIRS could also be used to predict ruminants’ diet composition in terms of plant species. These predictions should be used only for ranking, however, because of the current lack of accurate procedures for determining diet selection individually. NIRS applied to faeces can be used to predict the in vivo characteristics of forage with sufficient accuracy. The prediction error of NIRS calibrations depends on the accuracy and precision of the reference data. The prediction of in vivo digestibility and intake is sufficiently repeatable compared with the procedure using the reference method. Intake is more difficult to predict with sufficient precision and is more closely linked to animal variability and to uncertainty of the FNIRS models. The major difficulty in using this method lies in generating the diet-faecal pairs as reliably as possible. FNIRS calibrations for predicting in vivo diet characteristics are derivative calibrations. The sample analysed for reference values (diet samples) differs from the samples submitted to NIRS analyses (faeces). With regard to research on forages, in vivo trials with animals confined in pens or digestibility crates appears to be the best reference method for generating FNIRS calibrations. Future work will involve developing FNIRS calibrations for predicting independent datasets and using them to create decision-support tools for improving diverse grazing management schemes. The major focus should be to compare different feeding strategies rather than to obtain an exact estimate of feed intake values. As a low-cost and rapid prediction technique, FNIRS could contribute significantly to the development of a methodology that would help improve our knowledge of forage and animal variability. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of direct unit costs associated with non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in five European countries
Bouee, S.; Lafuma, A.; Fagnani, F. et al

in Rheumatology International (2006), 26(12), 1063-1072

The objective of this study was to estimate the unit costs of non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in five European countries based on the results of the SOTI and TROPOS clinical trials in postmenopausal ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to estimate the unit costs of non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in five European countries based on the results of the SOTI and TROPOS clinical trials in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. The information recorded in the Case Report Forms was used. The perspective of third party payers was adopted. Hip fracture unit cost was the highest. The ranges of costs among countries was narrow for hip from 8,346 euro (Italy) to 9,907 euro (France), but wider for other fractures: 890 euro (Spain) to 2,022 euro (Italy) for wrist, 1,167 euro (Spain) to 3,268 euro (Italy) for pelvis, 837 euro (Spain) to 2,116 euro (Italy) for sternum/clavicle, 565 euro (Spain) to 908 euro (France) for rib, 1,518 euro (Spain) to 3,651 euro (Belgium) for humerus, 1,805 euro (Spain) to 3,521 euro (Italy) for leg. The costs of those fractures should be considered when estimating the cost of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (3 ULg)