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See detailEffects of Rice Straw on the Color and Microstructure of Bizen, a Traditional Japanese Stoneware, as a Function of Oxygen Partial Pressure
Kusano, Y.; Doi, A.; Fukuhara, M. et al

in Journal of the American Ceramic Society (2009), 92(8), 1840-1844

The effects of oxygen partial pressure during thermal treatment on the color and microstructure of Bizen, a traditional Japanese stoneware, were studied through model experiments using clay pellets ... [more ▼]

The effects of oxygen partial pressure during thermal treatment on the color and microstructure of Bizen, a traditional Japanese stoneware, were studied through model experiments using clay pellets covered lightly with rice straw as a coloring assistant. When heated in flowing nitrogen, the model pellet turned blackish owing to the formation of alpha-Fe particles coated with graphite. However, schreibersite (Fe3P), which is also blackish, was formed specifically on the pellet surface in direct contact with the straw. The rice straw seems to have generated a strongly reducing atmosphere, strong enough for the metallization to alpha-Fe, and also to have provided phosphorus through contact. When oxygen content in the surrounding gas atmosphere was raised to N-2/O-2=99/1, the pellet surface turned yellowish brown because the main coloring material was Fe3+-containing mullite. At oxygen contents of N-2/O-2=98/2 or more, the formation of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) pushed the color to deep red. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of romifidine on pulmonary function in horses with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in clinical remission
Votion, Dominique ULiege; Ghafir, Yasmine; Vandenput, Sandrina ULiege et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1996), 431(6), 324

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (3 ULiège)
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See detailEffects of rotation on the evolution and asteroseismic properties of red giants
Eggenberger, P.; Miglio, Andrea ULiege; Montalban Iglesias, Josefa ULiege et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 509

Context. The recent observations of solar-like oscillations in many red giant stars with the CoRoT satellite stimulated the theoretical study of the effects of various physical processes on the modelling ... [more ▼]

Context. The recent observations of solar-like oscillations in many red giant stars with the CoRoT satellite stimulated the theoretical study of the effects of various physical processes on the modelling of these stars. <BR /> Aims: The influence of rotation on the properties of red giants is studied in the context of the asteroseismic modelling of these stars. <BR /> Methods: The effects of rotation on the global and asteroseismic properties of red giant stars with a mass larger than the mass limit for degenerate He burning are investigated by comparing rotating models computed with a comprehensive treatment of shellular rotation to non-rotating ones. <BR /> Results: While red giants exhibit low surface rotational velocities, we find that the rotational history of the star has a large impact on its properties during the red giant phase. In particular, for stars massive enough to ignite He burning in non-degenerate conditions, rotational mixing induces a significant increase of the stellar luminosity and shifts the location of the core helium burning phase to a higher luminosity in the HR diagram. This of course results in a change of the seismic properties of red giants at the same evolutionary state. As a consequence the inclusion of rotation significantly changes the fundamental parameters of a red giant star as determined by performing an asteroseismic calibration. In particular rotation decreases the derived stellar mass and increases the age. Depending on the rotation law assumed in the convective envelope and on the initial velocity of the star, non-negligible values of rotational splitting can be reached, which may complicate the observation and identification of non-radial oscillation modes for red giants exhibiting moderate surface rotational velocities. By comparing the effects of rotation and overshooting, we find that the main-sequence widening and the increase of the H-burning lifetime induced by rotation (V[SUB]ini[/SUB]) = 150 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP]) are well reproduced by non-rotating models with an overshooting parameter of 0.1, while the increase of luminosity during the post-main sequence evolution is better reproduced by non-rotating models with overshooting parameters twice as large. This illustrates the fact that rotation not only increases the size of the convective core but also changes the chemical composition of the radiative zone. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of rotational mixing on the asteroseismic properties of solar-type stars
Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 519

Context. Observations of solar-like oscillations obtained either from the ground or from space stimulated the study of the effects of various physical processes on the modelling of solar-type stars. <BR ... [more ▼]

Context. Observations of solar-like oscillations obtained either from the ground or from space stimulated the study of the effects of various physical processes on the modelling of solar-type stars. <BR /> Aims: The influence of rotational mixing on the evolution and asteroseismic properties of solar-type stars is studied. <BR /> Methods: Global and asteroseismic properties of models of solar-type stars computed with and without a comprehensive treatment of shellular rotation are compared. The effects of internal magnetic fields are also discussed in the framework of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo. <BR /> Results: Rotational mixing changes the global properties of a solar-type star with a significant increase of the effective temperature resulting in a shift of the evolutionary track to the blue part of the HR diagram. These differences observed in the HR diagram are related to changes of the chemical composition, because rotational mixing counteracts the effects of atomic diffusion leading to larger helium surface abundances for rotating models than for non-rotating ones. Higher values of the large frequency separation are then found for rotating models than for non-rotating ones at the same evolutionary stage, because the increase of the effective temperature leads to a smaller radius and hence to an increase of the stellar mean density. In addition to changing the global properties of solar-type stars, rotational mixing also has a considerable impact on the structure and chemical composition of the central stellar layers by bringing fresh hydrogen fuel to the central stellar core, thereby enhancing the main-sequence lifetime. The increase of the central hydrogen abundance together with the change of the chemical profiles in the central layers result in a significant increase of the values of the small frequency separations and of the ratio of the small to large separations for models including shellular rotation. This increase is clearly seen for models with the same age sharing the same initial parameters except for the inclusion of rotation as well as for models with the same global stellar parameters and in particular the same location in the HR diagram. By computing rotating models of solar-type stars including the effects of a dynamo that possibly occurs in the radiative zone, we find that the efficiency of rotational mixing is strongly reduced when the effects of magnetic fields are taken into account, in contrast to what happens in massive stars. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of samples conservation on photosynthetic efficiency assessment of phytoplankton using PAM fluorometry
Garrido, Marie ULiege; Cecchi, Philippe; Vaquer, André et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part I, Oceanographic Research Papers (2013), 71

Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry is now a widely used method for the assessment of phytoplankton fitness, with an increasing popularity in field assessments. It is usually recommended to carry ... [more ▼]

Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry is now a widely used method for the assessment of phytoplankton fitness, with an increasing popularity in field assessments. It is usually recommended to carry out measurements swiftly after collection, but the number of samples and analytical procedures needed to obtain valuable datasets sometimes makes immediate analysis impracticable, forcing delays between fluorescence measurements. Conservation conditions of samples before analysis may potentially affect their photosynthetic performances but no formal study documenting such impacts appears available in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of storage conditions (temperature, duration) on photosynthetic parameters in different phytoplankton communities (characterized in situ by a BBE fluoroprobe) sampled during summer in different environmental locations in a Mediterranean lagoon (Biguglia lagoon, Corsica, France). PAM-fluorescence parameters were measured after three different conservation durations (2h to 4h, 6h to 8h and 10h to 12h after collection) on samples stored at three different temperatures (15°C, 25°C and 35°C). Results showed that storage at the highest temperature severely impacted photosynthetic parameters, with cumulative effects as storage duration increased. For phytoplankton samples collected in warm or tropical environments, storage at “room temperature” (25°C) only appeared a valid option if measurements have to be carried out strictly within a very short delay. Inversely, cooling the samples (i.e. conservation at 15°C) did not induce significant effects, independently of storage duration. Cooling appeared the best solution when sampling-to-analysis delay goes over a few hours. Long-term storage (>8h) should definitively be avoided. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of sc-FOS on insulin sensitivity in obese dogs
Respondek, F.; Detilleux, Johann ULiege; Wagner, A. et al

in Coenen, M.; Vervuert, I. (Eds.) Proceedings of the 11th ESVCN Congress (2007)

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See detailEffects of Schwann Cell Transplantation in a Contusion Model of Rat Spinal Cord Injury
Martin, Didier ULiege; Robe, Pierre ULiege; Franzen, Rachelle ULiege et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1996), 45(5), 588-597

Cultured Schwann cells were transplanted at various delays into a spinal cord contusion injury performed at low thoracic level in adult female rats. The Schwann cells were purified from the dorsal root ... [more ▼]

Cultured Schwann cells were transplanted at various delays into a spinal cord contusion injury performed at low thoracic level in adult female rats. The Schwann cells were purified from the dorsal root ganglia of adult syngeneic animals. the transplants were well tolerated, and the transplanted Schwann cells invaded the injured spinal cord. As quantified using video image analysis, the survival and growth of the transplanted cells were poor when the grafting procedure was performed 3-4 days after injury and very good when performed immediately or 10 days after injury, in which cases post-traumatic micro- and macrocavitation were strongly reduced. In animals grafted immediately after injury but not in animals grafted after 10 days, post-traumatic astrogliosis was much reduced. The Schwann cells transplanted area was invaded by numerous regenerating axons, the vast majority of which were, based on the neurotransmitter (CGRP and SP) profile, originating from dorsal root ganglion. No regeneration of the corticospinal tract as assessed after anterograde tracing or of descending aminergic fibers could be demonstrated. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of seawater temperature on sound characteristics in Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae)
Kever, Loïc ULiege; Boyle, Kelly S.; Parmentier, Eric ULiege

in Journal of Fish Biology (2015)

Although the sound production mechanisms of male and female Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae) differ significantly, temperature affects them in the same manner. In both sexes, temperature correlated negatively ... [more ▼]

Although the sound production mechanisms of male and female Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae) differ significantly, temperature affects them in the same manner. In both sexes, temperature correlated negatively with pulse period and positively with sound frequencies but had no, or weak effects on other sound characteristics [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of seed traits variation on seedling performance of the invasive weed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia
Monty, Arnaud ULiege; Mahy, Grégory ULiege; Ortmans, William ULiege

Poster (2016, September 14)

Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for ... [more ▼]

Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for annuals, opportunists or invasive plant species. Seedling performance can vary among mothers or populations in response to environmental conditions or under the influence of seed traits. However, very few studies have investigated seed traits variations and their consequences on seedling performance. Specifically, the following questions have been addressed by this work: 1) How the seed traits of the invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. vary among mothers and populations, as well as along the latitude; 2) How do seed traits influence seedling performance; 3) Is the influence on seedlings temperature dependent. With seeds from nine Western Europe ruderal populations, seed traits that can influence seedling development were measured. The seeds were sown into growth chambers with warmer or colder temperature treatments. During seedling growth, performance-related traits were measured. A high variability in seed traits was highlighted. Variation was determined by the mother identity and population, but not latitude. Together, the temperature, population and the identity of the mother had an effect on seedling performance. Seed traits had a relative impact on seedling performance, but this did not appear to be temperature dependent. Seedling performance exhibited a strong plastic response to the temperature, was shaped by the identity of the mother and the population, and was influenced by a number of seed traits. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of seed traits variation on seedling performance of the invasive weed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.
Ortmans, William ULiege; Mahy, Grégory ULiege; Monty, Arnaud ULiege

in Acta Oecologica: International Journal of Ecology (2016), 71

Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for ... [more ▼]

Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for annuals, opportunists or invasive plant species. Seedling performance can vary among mothers or populations in response to environmental conditions or under the influence of seed traits. However, very few studies have investigated seed traits variations and their consequences on seedling performance. Specifically, the following questions have been addressed by this work: 1) How the seed traits of the invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. vary among mothers and populations, as well as along the latitude; 2) How do seed traits influence seedling performance; 3) Is the influence on seedlings temperature dependent. With seeds from nine Western Europe ruderal populations, seed traits that can influence seedling development were measured. The seeds were sown into growth chambers with warmer or colder temperature treatments. During seedling growth, performance-related traits were measured. A high variability in seed traits was highlighted. Variation was determined by the mother identity and population, but not latitude. Together, the temperature, population and the identity of the mother had an effect on seedling performance. Seed traits had a relative impact on seedling performance, but this did not appear to be temperature dependent. Seedling performance exhibited a strong plastic response to the temperature, was shaped by the identity of the mother and the population, and was influenced by a number of seed traits. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of selection on linkage analysis for quantitative traits
Mackinnon, M. J.; Georges, Michel ULiege

in Genetics (1992), 132

The effects of within-sample selection on the outcome of analyses detecting linkage between genetic markers and quantitative traits were studied. It was found that selection by truncation for the trait of ... [more ▼]

The effects of within-sample selection on the outcome of analyses detecting linkage between genetic markers and quantitative traits were studied. It was found that selection by truncation for the trait of interest significantly reduces the differences between marker genotype means thus reducing the power to detect linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). The size of this reduction is a function of proportion selected, the magnitude of the QTL effect, recombination rate between the marker locus and the QTL, and the allele frequency of the QTL. Proportion selected was the most influential of these factors on bias, e.g., for an allele substitution effect of one standard deviation unit, selecting the top 80%, 50% or 20% of the population required 2,6 or 24 times the number of progeny, respectively, to offset the loss of power caused by this selection. The effect on power was approximately linear with respect to the size of gene effect, almost invariant to recombination rate, and a complex function of QTL allele frequency. It was concluded that experimental samples from animal populations which have been subjected to even minor amounts of selection will be inefficient in yielding information on linkage between markers and loci influencing the quantitative trait under selection. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of sertraline on depressive symptoms and attentional and executive functions in major depression
Constant, Eric; Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Gillain, B. et al

in Depression and Anxiety (2005), 21(2), 78-89

Reports on the severity and reversibility of cognitive disturbances in major depression in the literature diverge due to methodological biases. The present study, using a precise methodology, examined ... [more ▼]

Reports on the severity and reversibility of cognitive disturbances in major depression in the literature diverge due to methodological biases. The present study, using a precise methodology, examined attention and executive functions in 20 relatively young, depressed patients presenting a first or second episode of unipolar major depression without psychotic or melancholic characteristics and all being treated with the same psychopharmacological treatment (sertraline) to investigate the changes in potential attentional and executive loss during a subacute period of treatment of 7 weeks. We compared their performance with a group of 26 control subjects who were administered the same cognitive tests. This study confirmed psychomotor slowing associated with attentional and executive disturbance in adults with major depression. Conscious attentional interference for words with a negative emotional valence also was shown. After the first weeks of treatment, the effect of the antidepressant treatment with sertraline was accompanied by a beneficial effect on psychomotor slowing on attentional and executive functions. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of sex steroids on aromatase mRNA expression in the male and female quail brain.
Voigt, Cornelia; Ball, Gregory F; Balthazart, Jacques ULiege

in General and Comparative Endocrinology (2011), 170(1), 180-8

Castrated male quail display intense male-typical copulatory behavior in response to exogenous testosterone but ovariectomized females do not. The behavior of males is largely mediated by the central ... [more ▼]

Castrated male quail display intense male-typical copulatory behavior in response to exogenous testosterone but ovariectomized females do not. The behavior of males is largely mediated by the central aromatization of testosterone into estradiol. The lack of behavioral response in females could result from a lower rate of aromatization. This is probably not the case because although the enzymatic sex difference is clearly present in gonadally intact sexually mature birds, it is not reliably found in gonadectomized birds treated with testosterone, in which the behavioral sex difference is always observed. We previously discovered that the higher aromatase activity in sexually mature males as compared to females is not associated with major differences in aromatase mRNA density. A reverse sex difference (females>males) was even detected in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. We analyzed here by in situ hybridization histochemistry the density of aromatase mRNA in gonadectomized male and female quail that were or were not exposed to a steroid profile typical of their sex. Testosterone and ovarian steroids (presumably estradiol) increased aromatase mRNA concentration in males and females respectively but mRNA density was similar in both sexes. A reverse sex difference in aromatase mRNA density (females>males) was detected in the bed nucleus of subjects exposed to sex steroids. Together these data suggest that although the induction of aromatase activity by testosterone corresponds to an increased transcription of the enzyme, the sex difference in enzymatic activity results largely from post-transcriptional controls that remain to be identified. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of sex steroids on fear reactions in cattle and sheep
Bouissou, M. F.; Boissy, A.; Vandenheede, Marc ULiege

Conference (1993)

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See detailEffects of shading and sediment alterations on Posidonia oceanica meadows: in situ experiments
Pete, Dorothée ULiege; Velimirov, Branko; Lepoint, Gilles ULiege et al

Conference (2010, November 24)

In the Mediterranean Sea, the seagrass Posidonia oceanica is affected by many threats from anthropogenic sources. One of them is the increasing development of fish farming, which is responsible of the ... [more ▼]

In the Mediterranean Sea, the seagrass Posidonia oceanica is affected by many threats from anthropogenic sources. One of them is the increasing development of fish farming, which is responsible of the destruction of some meadows. Within troubles cause by those fish farms on the surrounding environment, the increase of phytoplankton biomass in the water column (leading to a shading effect) and a modification of the sediment are often cited as a reason of seagrass disappearance. To understand how those troubles are affecting P. oceanica and its sedimentary compartment, in situ experiments were led during three months, from the end of May til the end of August 2009, in STARESO (STAtion de REcherches Sous-marines et Océanographiques, Corsica, France), at a depth of 10 meters. The shading was mimicked by three replicated shading frames (3 x 1 m), which stopped around 50 % of the incident light. To modify the sedimentary compartment, some sediment was taken from under the fish farm of Calvi (Corsica, France) and added once a week on marked zones in the seagrass meadow. Those sites were compared with a control site, situated in the same meadow. Samples were taken once a month and consisted in pore water, sediment cores and shoots of P. oceanica. An estimation of the density of the meadow in every sampling zones was also performed. Measured parameters are the concentration of nutrients in pore water, grain size, redox potential discontinuity (RPD), biomass of bacteria, organic matter, meiofauna and microphytobenthos within the sediment, total carbon and nitrogen in the sediment and leaves, the length, width and biomass of leaves and shoots, the biomass of epiphytes and the content of chlorophyll a in leaves. During those experiments, Posidonia oceanica was not very affected. However, some parameters of the sedimentary compartment were modified (RPD, biomass of bacteria, organic matter, nutrients in pore water,…), suggesting a modification in the functioning of the ecosystem. These results are important because they show that the sedimentary compartment reacts more rapidly to threats then the seagrass itself. So, it could be an interesting tool in quality assessments. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of short chain fructo-oligosaccharides on insulin sensitivity and gene expression of fat tissues in obese dogs
Respondek, F.; Swanson, K.; Herpigny, F. et al

in Proceedings of the Nutrition Society (2008), 67

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See detailEffects of short-chain fructooligosaccharides supplementation during weight loss on lipoprotein concentrations in dogs
Jeusette, Isabelle; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULiege; Delobel, Agathe et al

Poster (2005, September)

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See detailEffects of short-range interactions on transport through quantum point contacts: A numerical approach
Lassl, Andreas; Schlagheck, Peter ULiege; Richter, Klaus

in Physical Review. B : Condensed Matter (2007), 75(4),

We study electronic transport through a quantum point contact, where the interaction between the electrons is approximated by a contact potential. Our numerical approach is based on the nonequilibrium ... [more ▼]

We study electronic transport through a quantum point contact, where the interaction between the electrons is approximated by a contact potential. Our numerical approach is based on the nonequilibrium Green-function technique which is evaluated at the Hartree-Fock level. We show that this approach allows us to reproduce relevant features of the so-called "0.7 anomaly" observed in the conductance at low temperatures, including the characteristic features in recent shot-noise measurements. This is consistent with a spin-splitting interpretation of the process, and indicates that the 0.7 anomaly should also be observable in transport experiments with ultracold fermionic atoms. [less ▲]

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