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See detailFeral Pigeons in the Cities : Cultural Categories and Wildlife Management
Colon, Paul-Louis ULg

Conference (2008, May 22)

From many aspects, one can observe that, by contrast with other times and places, feral pigeons do not have a definite status in contemporary European cities. They seem to be perpetually crossing ... [more ▼]

From many aspects, one can observe that, by contrast with other times and places, feral pigeons do not have a definite status in contemporary European cities. They seem to be perpetually crossing boundaries between different categories that people usually refer to in order to understand and engage with the world surrounding them. As a part of wildlife in an urban environment, feral pigeons elicit contrasted feelings amongst inhabitants of cities and question cultural distinctions such as domestic/wild, public/private, clean/dirt, etc. This research was a part of a multidisciplinary project aiming at evaluating both ecological and anthropological dimensions of the presence of feral pigeons in Paris. It will be argued that feral pigeons in cities could be viewed as a kind of symbolic disorder. Political measures, scientific interest and citizen behaviors towards them could therefore be understood as attempts to give the pigeons a definite status. This perspective could help improving the management of urban biodiversity by providing clues to integrate its ecological and cultural dimensions. [less ▲]

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See detailFerdinand Campus (1894-1983). Professeur à l'ULg/Recteur et ingénieur
Genin, Vincent ULg

in Académie Royale des Sciences d'Outre-Mer (Ed.) Dictionnaire Biographique des Belges d'Outre-Mer (2013)

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See detailFerdinand de Saussure, « Les aventures de Polytychus »
Badir, Sémir ULg

in Badir, Sémir (Ed.) Saussure (2003)

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See detailFermat
Bouquiaux, Laurence ULg

in Encyclopédie philosophique universelle. III Les oeuvre philosophiques (1992)

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See detailFerme Delsamme : action entre utopie et réalité
Muramatsu, Kenjiro ULg

Report (2009)

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See detailFermentable Carbohydrates and dietary protein level differently shape the bacterial community structure in the proximal colon of pigs
Boudry, Christelle ULg; Pieper, Robert; Vahjen, Wilfried et al

in International workshop on nutrition and intestinal microbiota host interaction in the pig : Book of abstracts (2013, October 24)

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See detailFermentable Fiber Ameliorates Fermentable Protein-Induced Changes in Microbial Ecology, but not the Mucosal Response, in the Colon of Piglets
Pieper, Robert; Kröger, Susan; Richter, Jan F. et al

in Journal of Nutrition (2012), 142

Dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) is reported to reduce large intestinal formation of putatively toxic metabolites derived from fermentable proteins (fCP). However, the influence of ... [more ▼]

Dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) is reported to reduce large intestinal formation of putatively toxic metabolites derived from fermentable proteins (fCP). However, the influence of diets high in fCP concentration on epithelial response and interaction with fCHO is still unclear. Thirty-two weaned piglets were fed 4 diets in a 2 3 2 factorial design with low fCP/low fCHO [14.5% crude protein (CP)/14.5% total dietary fiber (TDF)]; low fCP/high fCHO (14.8% CP/ 16.6% TDF); high fCP low fCHO (19.8% CP/14.5% TDF); and high fCP/high fCHO (20.1% CP/18.0% TDF) as dietary treatments. After 21–23 d, pigs were killed and colon digesta and tissue samples analyzed for indices of microbial ecology, tissue expression of genes for cell turnover, cytokines, mucus genes (MUC), and oxidative stress indices. Pig performance was unaffected by diet. fCP increased (P , 0.05) cell counts of clostridia in the Clostridium leptum group and total short and branched chain fatty acids, ammonia, putrescine, histamine, and spermidine concentrations, whereas high fCHO increased (P , 0.05) cell counts of clostridia in the C. leptum and C. coccoides groups, shifted the acetate to propionate ratio toward acetate (P , 0.05), and reduced ammonia and putrescine (P , 0.05). High dietary fCP increased (P , 0.05) expression of PCNA, IL1b, IL10, TGFb, MUC1, MUC2, and MUC20, irrespective of fCHO concentration. The ratio of glutathione:glutathione disulfide was reduced (P , 0.05) by fCP and the expression of glutathione transferase was reduced by fCHO (P , 0.05). In conclusion, fermentable fiber ameliorates fermentable protein-induced changes in most measures of luminal microbial ecology but not the mucosal response in the large intestine of pigs. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentable non-starch polysaccharides increase the excretion of bacterial proteins in the pig's faeces and reduce urinary N excretion.
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Leterme, Pascal; Wavreille, José et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2008), 86(suppl. 3), 101

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (9 ULg)
See detailFermentaciones ruminales en ovinos alimentados con pasto solo o complementado.
Rodriguez, F.; Thewis, André ULg; Francois, E. et al

Scientific conference (1988, December)

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See detailFermentation contrôlée des olives vertes de table.
Lamzira, Z.; Ghabour, N.; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2007, June 07)

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See detailFermentation du kivuguto, lait traditionnel du Rwanda: mise au point d’un starter lactique
Karenzi, Eugène ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Résumé Une recherche pour la production industrielle du kivuguto, lait caillé traditionnel du Rwanda a été entreprise par la sélection de micro-organismes responsables de la fermentation de ce lait ... [more ▼]

Résumé Une recherche pour la production industrielle du kivuguto, lait caillé traditionnel du Rwanda a été entreprise par la sélection de micro-organismes responsables de la fermentation de ce lait normalement produit artisanalement. Pour ce faire, il fallait une mise au point d’un starter lactique à partir des isolats issus des échantillons de lait artisanal kivuguto. Au terme de quatre échantillonnages, un dénombrement, un isolement et une purification ont abouti à conserver dans la Collection du CWBI 390 souches pures. Par des analyses phénotypiques (microscopiques, biochimiques), associées à des tests de résistance aux conditions extrêmes et à une analyse préliminaire des propriétés technologiques, 7 souches ont été pré-sélectionnées pour la poursuite du screening. Une caractérisation moléculaire par la méthode de 16S ADNr associé ou non à l’ITS 16S-23S ADNr a assimilé ces souches à deux Lactococcus lactis, deux Leuconostoc mesenteroides et trois Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides. Des essais de formulation de laits fermentés par des mélanges de souches et leur conservation pendant 24 jours ont permis de formuler un lait fermenté semblable au lait artisanal kivuguto par l’association d’un Lactococcus lactis, d’un Leuconostoc mesenteroides et d’un Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides. En effet, lors d’une analyse sensorielle discriminative, un jury de dégustation constitué de huit personnes est parvenu à identifier ce lait formulé parmi deux autres laits fermentés commercialisés aussi sur le marché à des différences significatives de p=0.05 dans une première série et p=0.01 dans une deuxième série. Des analyses technologiques proprement dites ont montré que ce lait formulé fermente après 14 heures avec une acidification de 73°D à pH4.6 et à 19°C, présente des caractéristiques d’un fluide visco-élastique. Son activité protéolytique est moyenne pour ne pas développer des peptides responsables de l’amertume en stockage. Son profil aromatique comporte cinq composés principaux 3-méthylbutan-1-ol, pentan-1-ol, acide acétique, furanméthan-2-ol et furan-2(5)H-one clairement identifiés par GC-MS. L’étude de la production et de la conservation de trois souches sélectionnées a montré une bonne stabilité sur trois mois à 4°C avec des viabilités cellulaires >90%, mais moins bonne à 20°C. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentation of date palm juice by curdlan gum production from Rhizobium radiobacter ATCC 6466 (TM): Purification, rheological and physico-chemical characterization
Ben Salah, Riadh; Jaouadi, Bassem; Bouaziz, Amin et al

in Lwt-Food Science And Technology (2011), 44(4), 1026-1034

The present study was undertaken to investigate the possibility of using date palm juice byproducts for curdlan production by Rhizobium radiobacter ATCC 6466(TM) in batch experiments. A number of ... [more ▼]

The present study was undertaken to investigate the possibility of using date palm juice byproducts for curdlan production by Rhizobium radiobacter ATCC 6466(TM) in batch experiments. A number of operational parameters, namely pH value, temperature range, inoculum ratio, agitation speed, carbon concentration, nitrogen source, and fermentation time, were investigated in terms of their optimal values for as well as individual and synergistic effects on curdlan production. The findings indicated that the strain exhibited a high ability to use the natural substrate under investigation. A curdlan production yield of 22.83 g/l was obtained in 500-ml agitated flasks (50 ml) when the strain was cultivated in the optimal medium (pH, 7; ammonium sulphate concentration, 2 g/l; date glucose juice concentration, 120 g/l) operating at 30 degrees C with an inoculum ratio of 5 ml/100 ml, an agitation speed of 180 rpm, and a fermentation period of 51 h. The purified date byproducts-curdlan (DBP-curdlan) had a molecular weight of 180 kDa, a linear structure composed exclusively of beta-(1,3)-glucosidic linkages, a melting temperature (T(m)) and glass transition temperature (T(g)) of 1.24 and -3.55 degrees C. respectively. The average measured heights of its molecules were noted to fluctuate between 14.1 +/- 0.07 and 211.73 +/- 0.6 mu m. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentation of Kivuguto, a Rwandese traditional milk : selection of microbes for a starter culture
Karenzi, E.; Dubois-Dauphin, R.; Mashaku, A. et al

in Sciences & technologie C (2012), 36

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See detailFermentation of non-starch polysaccharides in the pig intestines.
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2007)

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See detailFermentation profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis as starter cultures on barley malt medium
Alloue-Boraud, Mireille; N’Guessan, Kouadio; Djeni, Théodore et al

in Journal of Food Science & Technology (in press)

Saccharomyces cerevisiae C8-5 and Candida tropicalis F0-5 isolated from traditional sorghum beer were tested for kinetic parameters on barley malt extract, YPD (863 medium) and for alcohol production. The ... [more ▼]

Saccharomyces cerevisiae C8-5 and Candida tropicalis F0-5 isolated from traditional sorghum beer were tested for kinetic parameters on barley malt extract, YPD (863 medium) and for alcohol production. The results showed that C. tropicalis has the highest maximum growth rate and the lowest doubling time. Values were 0.22 h-1 and 0.32 h-1 for maximum growth rate, 3 h 09 min and 2 h 09 min for doubling time respectively on barley malt extract and YPD. On contrary, glucose consumption was the fastest with S. cerevisiae (-0.36 g/l/h and -0.722 g/l/h respectively on barley malt extract and YPD). When these two yeasts were used as starters in pure culture and co-culture at proportion of 1:1 and 2:1 (cell/cell) for barley malt extract fermentation, we noticed that maltose content increased first from 12.12 g/l to 13.62-16.46 g/l and then decreased. The highest increase was obtained with starter C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1. On contrary, glucose content decreased throughout all the fermentation process. For all the starters used, the major part of the ethanol was produced at 16 h of fermentation. Values obtained in the final beers were 11.4, 11.6, 10.4 and 10.9 g/l for fermentation conducted with S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis, C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 1:1 and C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1. Cell viability measurement during the fermentation by using flow cytometry revealed that the lowest mean channel fluorescence for FL3 (yeast rate of death) was obtained with C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1 after 48 h of fermentation. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentative biohydrogen production in a novel biodisc bioreactor: Principle and Improvement
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Masset, Julien ULg et al

in Bozhou, Li (Ed.) Low Carbon Earth Summit 2011 Proceeding (2011, October 23)

In order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates, the biotechnological process needs to be further optimized and efficient bioreactors must be designed. A biodisc bioreactor has been ... [more ▼]

In order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates, the biotechnological process needs to be further optimized and efficient bioreactors must be designed. A biodisc bioreactor has been design and investigated to produce biohydrogen from glucose by the Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009 strain at a high yield and production rate. This reactor, working continuously, has an internal volume of 2.3l but a working volume (liquid phase) of 300ml. Firstly, it enhances the hydrogen production rate (by about 3 times more than a completely stirred bioreactor) by partially fixing the bacteria on the porous support and thus increasing the cell concentration in the bioreactor (decoupling of HRT and SRT). Secondly, the rotating biodisc design enables efficient gas transfer (hydrogen and carbon dioxyde) from the liquid phase where it is produced by the bacteria to the headspace. Indeed, this is an important way to increase hydrogen production yields (by about 25% compared to a completely stirred bioreactor) by allowing the bacteria to focus on the metabolites pathways that produce more hydrogen. Other reactors designs have shown such good results by increasing the interfacial surface. [less ▲]

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