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See detailEffects of space allowance on gas emissions from group-housed gestating sows
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Canart, Bernard et al

in Book of abstract of the 60th Annual meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2009)

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See detailEffects of space allowance on the welfare of dry sows kept in dynamic groups and fed with an electronic sow feeder
Remience, Virginie; Wavreille, José; Canart, Bernard et al

in Applied Animal Behaviour Science (2008), 112(3-4), 284-296

The minimal legal space allowance for grouped pregnant sows in the EU is 2.25 m(2)/sow. The effect of higher space per animal on agonistic behaviour and social stress of animals living in dynamic groups ... [more ▼]

The minimal legal space allowance for grouped pregnant sows in the EU is 2.25 m(2)/sow. The effect of higher space per animal on agonistic behaviour and social stress of animals living in dynamic groups is not known. Two groups of 34 pregnant Belgian Landrace sows were housed in two pens of respectively 102 m(2) (3 m(2)/sow) and 76.5 m(2) (2.25 m(2)/sow). Each sow lived there for 15 weeks. Sows were fed through an electronic sow feeder. According to the dynamic system, one third of each group (i.e. 11 or 12 nearly parturient sows) was replaced every 5 weeks by the same number of recently inseminated sows. Welfare indicators were collected during six of these 5 week-periods: performance, agonistic behaviour, skin lesion score and salivary cortisol. No differences were observed for production parameters, or for fighting activity. However, the mean number of one-way aggressions, when observed during 2 h-periods at 3 and 8 days after grouping, was significantly lower in the large pen than in the small one (respectively 16 +/- 2 versus 26 +/- 3, p < 0.01, and 10 +/- 2 versus 20 +/- 5, p < 0.05). The mean number of injuries was also lower with the 3 m(2) space allowance, when collected on the introduced sows one, 2 and 3 weeks after grouping. Some contradictory differences in salivary cortisol were noted 2 and 26 h after mixing, but without reaching statistical significance. An available area 33% higher than the EU legal minimum reduced agonistic behaviour and consecutive wounds and thus induced better welfare conditions for sows living in dynamic groups and fed with an electronic sow feeder. The impact on productivity and social physiological stress need further research. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of space allowance on the welfare of pregnant sows housed in dynamic groups.
Remience, Virginie; Wavreille, José; Cloet, D. et al

in Proceedings of the 40th International Congress of the Internationnal Society for Applied Ethology (2006)

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See detailEffects of specific dopaminergic agonists and antagonists in the open-field test.
Bruhwyler, J.; Chleide, E.; Liégeois, Jean-François ULg et al

in Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior (1991), 39(2), 367-71

It has been found that dopaminergic transmission could be involved in some aspects of anxiety. The present study aims to explore this hypothesis further, using specific DA1 (SKF 38393) and DA2 ... [more ▼]

It has been found that dopaminergic transmission could be involved in some aspects of anxiety. The present study aims to explore this hypothesis further, using specific DA1 (SKF 38393) and DA2 (bromocriptine) agonists or DA1 (SCH 23390), and DA2 (zetidoline) antagonists in the open-field test. The results confirm previous studies indicating that DA1 and DA2 agonists predominantly increase locomotor activity, while DA1 and DA2 antagonists predominantly decrease it. However, at low doses, the four drugs increase the peripheral ambulation score significantly and, with the exception of zetidoline, also increase the central ambulation score. The observations made with zetidoline confirm the hypothesis that a specific presynaptic DA2 antagonism could be determinant for the disinhibitory effects of low doses of neuroleptics. A collateral action on 5HT transmission is also suggested to explain an hypothetic anxiolytic action of DA agonists and SCH 23390 at lower doses. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of sphingosine and sphingosine analogues on the free radical production by stimulated neutrophils: ESR and chemiluminescence studies.
Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Deby, Ginette ULg; Hoebeke, Maryse ULg et al

in Mediators of Inflammation (1997), 6(5-6), 327-33

Sphingolipids inhibit the activation of the neutrophil (PMN) NADPH oxidase by protein kinase C pathway. By electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) and chemiluminescence (CL), we studied the effects of ... [more ▼]

Sphingolipids inhibit the activation of the neutrophil (PMN) NADPH oxidase by protein kinase C pathway. By electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) and chemiluminescence (CL), we studied the effects of sphingosine (SPN) and ceramide analogues on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 5 x 10(-7)M) stimulated PMN (6 x 10(6) cells). By ESR with spin trapping (100 mM DMPO: 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-Noxide), we showed that SPN (5 to 8 x 10(-6)M), C(2)-ceramide (N-acetyl SPN) and C(6)-ceramide (N-hexanoyl SPN) at the final concentration of 2 x 10(-5) and 2 x 10(-4)M inhibit the production of free radicals by stimulated PMN. The ESR spectrum of stimulated PMN was that of DMPO-superoxide anion spin adduct. Inhibition by 5 x 10(-6)M SPN was equivalent to that of 30 U/ml SOD. SPN (5 to 8 x 10(-6)M) has no effect on in vitro systems generating superoxide anion (xanthine 50 mM/xanthine oxidase 110 mU/ml) or hydroxyl radical (Fenton reaction: 88 mM H(2)O(2), 0.01 mM Fe(2+) and 0.01 mM EDTA). SPN and N-acetyl SPN also inhibited the CL of PMA stimulated PMN in a dose dependent manner (from 2 x 10(-6) to 10(-5)M), but N-hexanoyl SPN was less active (from 2 x 10(-5) to 2 x 10(-4)M). These effects were compared with those of known PMN inhibitors, superoxide dismutase, catalase and azide. SPN was a better inhibitor compared with these agents. The complete inhibition by SPN of ESR signal and CL of stimulated PMN confirms that this compound or one of its metabolites act at the level of NADPH-oxidase, the key enzyme responsible for production of oxygen-derived free radicals. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Spread of Hatch and Delayed Feed Access on Broiler Post-Hatch Performance up to Day 5
Wang, Yufeng; Li, Yue; Willems, Els et al

in Proceedings of Fundamental Physiology of the European working group of physiology and perinatal development in poultry. (2011)

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See detailEffects of Starch as Carbon precursor on hydrothermal synthesis and Electrochemical performance of Sodium manganese iron phosphate /carbon
Karegeya, Claude ULg; Vertruyen, Bénédicte ULg; Cloots, Rudi ULg et al

Poster (2014, November 05)

Currently Sodium based electrode materials for Li and Na-ion batteries are getting more attention as the most promising potential alternatives of their lithiated counterparts due to their cost effective ... [more ▼]

Currently Sodium based electrode materials for Li and Na-ion batteries are getting more attention as the most promising potential alternatives of their lithiated counterparts due to their cost effective, environmental friendly characteristics and availability of sodium. Nevertheless, it remains a practical challenge to find an electrode material of LIBs and SIBs showing ideal performance. We report here a composite material of Sodium manganese iron phosphate/carbon, successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method. We have characterized our material by using a combination of Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Sodium manganese iron phosphate (NMFP) particles are electrochemically activated by starch and acetylene black to form NMFP/C cathode material for LIBs. NMFP/C composite in which starch is used as carbon precursor exhibits good discharge capacity due to the presence of pyran rings which increase NMFP/C conductivity. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of starch, saccharose and fat in dog's diet on plasma metabolites
Diez, Marianne ULg; Baldwin, Paule ULg; Clinquart, Antoine ULg et al

in Proceedings of 18th world congress of the World Small Animal Veterinary Association. (1993)

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See detailEffects of steam treated linseed with barley as support on the performances of growing fattening bulls
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Gielen, Marc ULg; Istasse, Louis ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 41th Annual Meeting of European Association of Animal Production (1990)

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See detailEffects of Steroidal and Non Steroidal Aromatase Inhibitors on Sexual Behavior and Aromatase-Immunoreactive Cells and Fibers in the Quail Brain
Foidart, Agnès ULg; Harada, N.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Brain Research (1994), 657(1-2), 105-23

Castrated quail were treated with Silastic implants filled with testosterone (T) in association with injections of the aromatase inhibitors, R76713 (racemic vorozole; 1 mg/kg twice a day) or 4 ... [more ▼]

Castrated quail were treated with Silastic implants filled with testosterone (T) in association with injections of the aromatase inhibitors, R76713 (racemic vorozole; 1 mg/kg twice a day) or 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (OHA; 5 mg/bird twice a day). [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of stocking rate and nitrogen fertilizer level on animal performance with suckling grazing cows
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Gielen, Marc ULg; Limbourg, Pierre et al

in Procedings of the 44th Annual Meeting of E.A.A.P. (1993)

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See detailEffects of stocking rate on animal performance and profitability of grazing bulls finished indoors
Gielen, Marc ULg; Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Limbourg, Pierre et al

in Proceedings of the 44th Annual Meeting of E.A.A.P. (1993)

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See detailEffects of storage conditions on sprouting of microtubers of yam (Dioscorea cayenensis-D. rotundata complex).
Ondo Ovono, Paul; Kevers, Claire ULg; Dommes, Jacques ULg

in Comptes Rendus des Séances de l'Académie des Sciences. Série III, Sciences de la Vie (2010)

The control of field tuber dormancy in yam (Dioscorea cayenensis- D.rotundata complex) is poorly understood. Although studies have examined single environmental factors and chemical treatments that might ... [more ▼]

The control of field tuber dormancy in yam (Dioscorea cayenensis- D.rotundata complex) is poorly understood. Although studies have examined single environmental factors and chemical treatments that might prolong tuber dormancy and storage, only a few were focused on further tuber sprouting. The present study concerns microtubers obtained by in vitro culture. When microtubers were harvested (after 9 months of culture) and directly transferred on a new medium without hormone, the tubers rapidly sprouted in in vitro conditions. No dormancy was observed in this case. Harvested microtubers were also stored dry in jars in sterile conditions during 2 to 18 weeks before in vitro sprouting. In this case, microtubers stored during 18 weeks sprouted more rapidly than those stored 8 weeks. A constant “dormancy-like period” (storage duration + sprouting delay) was observed, between 20 and 28 weeks respectively for the more rapid and the slower microtubers. The size of the tubers used for the storage had great influence on further sprouting. The larger they were, the better they sprouted. Light during storage had no effect on the sprouting delay while a temperature of 25 °C permit a quicker sprouting than 18 °C. The medium used to obtain microtubers could also have an effect on sprouting rate. Ex vitro sprouting was not a problem. There was a delay in sprouting in contrast to in vitro conditions but the rate of 100% was kept. This fact was very important for an agronomical application of this technique to the production of “seeds” directly usable in the field or after culture in greenhouse. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of stress on singing voice accuracy
Larrouy, Pauline ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg

in Journal of Voice (2014), 28(1), 52-58

Objective: The quality of a music performance can be lessened or enhanced if the performer experiences stressful conditions. In addition, the quality of a sung performance requires control of the ... [more ▼]

Objective: The quality of a music performance can be lessened or enhanced if the performer experiences stressful conditions. In addition, the quality of a sung performance requires control of the fundamental frequency of the voice, which is particularly sensitive to stress. The present study aimed to clarify the effects of stress on singing voice accuracy. Methods: Thirty-one music students were recorded in a stressful condition (i.e., a music examination) and a non-stressful condition. Two groups were defined according to the challenge level of the music examination (first and second music levels). Measurements were made by self-reported state anxiety (CSAI-2R questionnaire) and by observing heart rate activity (electrocardiogram) during each performance. In addition, the vocal accuracy of the sung performances was objectively analyzed. Results: As expected, state anxiety and heart rate were significantly higher on the day of the music examination than in the non-stressful condition for all the music students. However, the effect of stress was positive for the first-year students but negative for the second-year students, for whom the music examination was particularly challenging. In addition, highly significant correlations were found between the intensity of cognitive symptoms and the vocal accuracy criteria. Discussion: This study highlights the contrasting effects of stress on singing voice accuracy but also the need to consider the challenge level and perception of the symptoms in experimental and pedagogical settings. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Strontium ranelate on knee osteoarthritis pain : a responder analysis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Bellamy, N et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 110

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See detailEffects of strontium ranelate on radiographic spinal osteoarthritis progression
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delferriere, Danielle; Roux, Christian et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2007, September), 56(number 9 (suppl.)), 315

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See detailEffects of Strontium Ranelate on Spinal Osteoarthritis Progression
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delferriere, D.; Roux, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008), 67(3), 335-9

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 3-year treatment with strontium ranelate could delay the progression of spinal osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This study was a post-hoc analysis ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 3-year treatment with strontium ranelate could delay the progression of spinal osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This study was a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention (SOTI) and TReatment Of Peripheral OSteoporosis (TROPOS) trials performed on 1105 women with osteoporosis and concomitant radiological spinal OA at baseline, and for whom lumbar x-rays were available at baseline and over the 3-year treatment period. The presence and severity of osteophytes, disc space narrowing and sclerosis in the lumbar intervertebral spaces was graded according to a validated method, and an overall OA score was calculated for each intervertebral space. Back pain (measured on a five-point Likert scale only in SOTI) and health-related quality of life (SF-36 questionnaire) were assessed at baseline and after 3 years. Patients who suffered an incident or progressive vertebral fracture during the study were excluded from the analysis. RESULTS: The proportion of patients with worsening overall spinal OA score was reduced by 42% in the strontium ranelate group, compared with placebo (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.79; p = 0.0005). Significantly more patients in the strontium ranelate group experienced an improvement in back pain after 3 years, compared with placebo (p = 0.03), while no significant difference was observed in terms of health-related quality of life between these patient groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this post-hoc analysis suggest that strontium ranelate could reduce the progression of the radiographic features of spinal OA and back pain in women with osteoporosis and prevalent spinal OA. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of strontium ranelate on the risk of vertebral fracture in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis
Meunier, Pierre J.; Roux, Christian; Seeman, Ego et al

in New England Journal of Medicine (2004), 350(5), 459-468

BACKGROUND: Osteoporotic structural damage and bone fragility result from reduced bone formation and increased bone resorption. In a phase 2 clinical trial, strontium ranelate, an orally active drug that ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Osteoporotic structural damage and bone fragility result from reduced bone formation and increased bone resorption. In a phase 2 clinical trial, strontium ranelate, an orally active drug that dissociates bone remodeling by increasing bone formation and decreasing bone resorption, has been shown to reduce the risk of vertebral fractures and to increase bone mineral density. METHODS: To evaluate the efficacy of strontium ranelate in preventing vertebral fractures in a phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 1649 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (low bone mineral density) and at least one vertebral fracture to receive 2 g of oral strontium ranelate per day or placebo for three years. We gave calcium and vitamin D supplements to both groups before and during the study. Vertebral radiographs were obtained annually, and measurements of bone mineral density were performed every six months. RESULTS: New vertebral fractures occurred in fewer patients in the strontium ranelate group than in the placebo group, with a risk reduction of 49 percent in the first year of treatment and 41 percent during the three-year study period (relative risk, 0.59; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.48 to 0.73). Strontium ranelate increased bone mineral density at month 36 by 14.4 percent at the lumbar spine and 8.3 percent at the femoral neck (P<0.001 for both comparisons). There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis with strontium ranelate leads to early and sustained reductions in the risk of vertebral fractures. [less ▲]

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