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See detailA first approximation for quantization of singular spaces
Poncin, Norbert; Radoux, Fabian ULg; Wolak, Robert

in Journal of Geometry & Physics (2009), 59(4), 503-518

Many mathematical models of physical phenomena that have been proposed in recent years require more general spaces than manifolds. When taking into account the symmetry group of the model, we get a ... [more ▼]

Many mathematical models of physical phenomena that have been proposed in recent years require more general spaces than manifolds. When taking into account the symmetry group of the model, we get a reduced model on the (singular) orbit space of the symmetry group action. We investigate quantization of singular spaces obtained as leaf closure spaces of regular Riemannian foliations on compact manifolds. These contain the orbit spaces of compact group actions and orbifolds. Our method uses foliation theory as a desingularization technique for such singular spaces. A quantization procedure on the orbit space of the symmetry group–that commutes with reduction–can be obtained from constructions which combine different geometries associated with foliations and new techniques originated in Equivariant Quantization. The present paper contains the first of two steps needed to achieve these just detailed goals. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst assessment of the biogeochemistry of the Congo River and its tributaries
Darchambeau, François ULg; Borges, Alberto ULg; Wabakanghanzi, José Nlandu et al

Scientific conference (2011, November 29)

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See detailFirst assessment of the biogeochemistry of the Congo River and tributaries
Darchambeau, François ULg; Bouillon, S.; Wabakanghanzi, J. N. et al

Poster (2011, April 08)

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See detailFirst assessment of the biogeochemistry of the Congo River and tributaries
Darchambeau, François ULg; Bouillon, S.; Wabakanghanzi, J. N. et al

Poster (2011)

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See detailFirst assessment of the biogeochemistry of the upper Congo River
Darchambeau, François ULg; Bouillon, S.; Borges, Alberto ULg

Poster (2012, April 22)

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See detailFirst assessment of the impacts of Saharan dust events on the respiratory health in West Africa: A case study in the Northern Benin
De Longueville, Florence ULg; Henry, Sabine; Ozer, Pierre ULg

in Belviso, Claudia; Fiore, Saverio; Giannossi, Maria Luigia (Eds.) DUST2014 - International Conference on Atmospheric Dust _ Book of Abstracts (2014)

More than 50% of the global dust emitted into the atmosphere comes from the Sahara. About 60% of the Saharan dust move southwards to the Gulf of Guinea (Engelstaedter et al., 2006). Once in the air, these ... [more ▼]

More than 50% of the global dust emitted into the atmosphere comes from the Sahara. About 60% of the Saharan dust move southwards to the Gulf of Guinea (Engelstaedter et al., 2006). Once in the air, these dust contribute to increase the concentrations of particles smaller than 10 microns (PM10), which are respirable particles (Ozer et al. 2005). A number of adverse health effects have been associated with desert dust, including respiratory diseases (Goudie, 2014). [...] [less ▲]

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See detailFirst asteroseismic results from CoRoT
Michel, Eric; Baglin, A.; Weiss, W. W. et al

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2008), 156

About one year after the end of the first observational run and six months after the first CoRoT data delivery, we comment the data exploitation progress for different types of stars. We consider first ... [more ▼]

About one year after the end of the first observational run and six months after the first CoRoT data delivery, we comment the data exploitation progress for different types of stars. We consider first results to illustrate how these data of unprecedented quality shed a new light on the field of stellar seismology. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst asteroseismic results from CoRoT
Michel, Eric; Baglin, Annie; Weiss, W.W. et al

in Communication in Asteroseismology (2008), 157

About one year after the end of the first observational run and six months after the first CoRoT data delivery, we comment the data exploitation progress for different types of stars. We consider first ... [more ▼]

About one year after the end of the first observational run and six months after the first CoRoT data delivery, we comment the data exploitation progress for different types of stars. We consider first results to illustrate how these data of unprecedented quality shed a new light on the field of stellar seismology. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst birth of an animal from an extinct subspecies (Capra pyrenaica pyrenaica) by cloning
Folch, J.; Cocero, M. J.; Chesne, P. et al

in Theriogenology (2009), 71

Two experiments have been performed to clone the bucardo, an extinct wild goat. The karyoplasts were thawed fibroblasts derived from skin biopsies, obtained and cryopreserved in 1999 from the last living ... [more ▼]

Two experiments have been performed to clone the bucardo, an extinct wild goat. The karyoplasts were thawed fibroblasts derived from skin biopsies, obtained and cryopreserved in 1999 from the last living specimen, a female, which died in 2000. Cytoplasts were mature oocytes collected from the oviducts of superovulated domestic goats. Oocytes were enucleated and coupled to bucardo's fibroblasts by electrofusion. Reconstructed embryos were cultured for 36h or 7d and transferred to either Spanish ibex or hybrid (Spanish ibex malex domestic goat) synchronized recipients. Embryos were placed, according to their developmental stage, into the oviduct or into the uterine horn ipsilateral to an ovulated ovary. Pregnancy was monitored through their plasmatic PAG levels. In Experiment 1, 285 embryos were reconstructed and 30 of them were transferred at the 3- to 6-cells stage to 5 recipients. The remaining embryos were further cultured to day 7, and 24 of them transferred at compact morula/blastocyst stage to 8 recipients. In Experiment 2, 154 reconstructed embryos were transferred to 44 recipients at the 3- to 6-cells stage. Pregnancies were attained in 0/8 and 7/49 of the uterine and oviduct-transferred recipients, respectively. One recipient maintained pregnancy to term, displaying very high PAG levels. One morphologically normal bucardo female was obtained by caesarean section. The newborn died some minutes after birth due to physical defects in lungs. Nuclear DNA confirmed that the clone was genetically identical to the bucardo's donor cells. To our knowledge, this is the first animal born from an extinct subspecies. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst carbon isotope chemostratigraphy of the Ouled Abdoun phosphate Basin, Morocco; implications for dating and evolution of earliest African placental mammals
Yans, J.; Amaghzaz, M.; Bouya, B. et al

in Gondwana Research (2014), 25(1), 257-269

The well-known Maastrichtian-Ypresian vertebrate-bearing phosphate series, in the Ouled Abdoun Basin, Morocco, is classically dated using regional selachian biostratigraphic zonation. These marine ... [more ▼]

The well-known Maastrichtian-Ypresian vertebrate-bearing phosphate series, in the Ouled Abdoun Basin, Morocco, is classically dated using regional selachian biostratigraphic zonation. These marine sediments yielded Paleocene and Eocene mammals comprising the earliest known placentals from Africa. This study provides the first insight into the organic carbon isotope chemostratigraphy (δ13Corg) of the Moroccan phosphate series and a refined dating of its vertebrate-bearing levels. Four Paleocene-Eocene sections in the NE Ouled Abdoun quarries show consistent δ13Corg long term evolutions, from the base to the top: 1) positive trend in phosphorite Bed IIa, beginning with the lower Bone Bed yielding mammals such as Eritherium, Ocepeia, Abdounodus, Lahimia, of early Thanetian and Selandian age; 2) transitional negative trend in the Intercalary phosphorite Beds II/I that includes the Otodus obliquus and Phosphatherium escuilliei Bone Bed of earliest Ypresian age; 3) negative trend to the lowermost δ13Corg values that are correlative to the early-middle Ypresian interval including ETM 2 and ETM 3 hyperthermal events in the global record; 4) positive trend in chert-enriched facies containing the middle Ypresian EECO global climatic event. Our chemostratigraphic study of the Ouled Abdoun phosphate series provides a new chronostratigraphic framework for calibrating the beginning of the evolution of placental mammals in Africa. The lower Bone Bed level from the Paleocene phosphorite Bed IIa yielding Eritherium is not younger than early Thanetian, and is most likely Selandian. The Phosphatherium Bone Bed in the Intercalary Beds II/I is earliest Ypresian. The phosphorite Bed 0, from which Daouitherium probably came, is early-middle Ypresian, just below the EECO. This suggests that the first large proboscideans evolved after the PETM, during mid-Ypresian warming events. The δ13Corg study does not support the presence of Lutetian in the NE Ouled Abdoun phosphate series and suggests that a noticeable part of the upper Thanetian is absent. © 2013 International Association for Gondwana Research. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst chronic wasting disease surveillance of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in North part of Belgium
De Bosschere, H.; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Neukermans, A. et al

in Veterinary Quarterly (The) (2006), 28

Cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in wild cervids have yet not been reported in Europe, whereas the disease is considered enzootic in free-ranging mule deer, Rocky mountain elk and white-tailed deer ... [more ▼]

Cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in wild cervids have yet not been reported in Europe, whereas the disease is considered enzootic in free-ranging mule deer, Rocky mountain elk and white-tailed deer in the area of Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska. New foci of CWD continue to be detected in other parts of the United States. However, no large-scale active epidemiosurveillance of European wild cervids is yet installed in Europe. In accordance with the opinion of the European Scientific Steering Committee, a preliminary (active) surveillance scheme was installed, in order to improve the knowledge of the CWD status of wild cervids (roe deer) in the Northern part of Belgium. Spleen samples (n=206) and brain samples (n=222) of roe deer collected in the Northern part of Belgium, were examined for CWD using the antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) of IDEXX. Afterwards, the EIA was systematically confirmed by immunohistochemistry using three antibodies, namely R524, 2G11 and 12F10. There were no indications on the occurrence of TSE in any of the samples. A Bayesian framework was used for the estimation of the true prevalence of CWD in the Northern part of Belgium that was estimated to have a median value of zero with a 95th percentile value of 0.0049 and 0.0045 for spleen and brain samples respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailThe First Cities in the Near East
Van der Stede, Véronique ULg

Conference (2002, April 03)

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See detailFirst Clarkforkian equivalent land mammal age in the latest Paleocene basal Sparnacian facies of Europe: Fauna, flora, paleoenvironment and (bio)stratigraphy
Smith, T.; Quesnel, F.; De Plöeg, G. et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(1),

The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is correlated with the first occurrences of earliest modern mammals in the Northern Hemisphere. The latest Paleocene Clarkforkian North American Land Mammal Age ... [more ▼]

The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is correlated with the first occurrences of earliest modern mammals in the Northern Hemisphere. The latest Paleocene Clarkforkian North American Land Mammal Age, that has yielded rodents and carnivorans, is the only exception to this rule. However, until now no pre-PETM localities have yielded modern mammals in Europe or Asia. We report the first Clarkforkian equivalent Land Mammal Age in the latest Paleocene deposits of the basal Sparnacian facies at Rivecourt, in the north-central part of the Paris Basin. The new terrestrial vertebrate and macroflora assemblages are analyzed through a multidisciplinary study including sedimentologic, stratigraphic, isotopic, and palynological aspects in order to reconstruct the paleoenvironment and to evaluate biochronologic and paleogeographic implications. The mammals are moderately diverse and not abundant, contrary to turtles and champsosaurs. The macroflora is exceptional in preservation and diversity with numerous angiosperms represented by flowers, fruits, seeds and wood preserved as lignite material, revealing an abundance of Arecaceae, Betulaceae, Icacinaceae, Menispermaceae, Vitaceae and probably Cornaceae. Results indicate a Late Paleocene age based on carbon isotope data, palynology and vertebrate occurrences such as the choristoderan Champsosaurus, the arctocyonid Arctocyon , and the plesiadapid Plesiadapis tricuspidens. However, several mammal species compare better with the earliest Eocene. Among these, the particular louisinid Teilhardimys musculus, also recorded from the latest Paleocene of the Spanish Pyrenees, suggests a younger age than the typical MP6 reference level. Nevertheless, the most important aspect of the Rivecourt fauna is the presence of dental remains of a rodent and a "miacid" carnivoran, attesting to the presence of two modern mammalian orders in the latest Paleocene of Europe. Interestingly, these two groups are also the only modern groups recorded from the latest Paleocene of North America, making Rivecourt the first direct equivalent to the Clarkforkian Land Mammal Age outside of North America. © 2014 Smith et al. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst clinical results of licofelone (ml3000), an inhibitor of COX-1, COX-2 and 5-LOX, for the treatment of osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bias, P.; Buchner, A.

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2002, June), 61(Suppl.1),

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See detailThe first community forests of Gabon : towards sustainable local forest management ?
Meunier, Quentin ULg; Federspiel, Michèle; Moumbogou, Carl et al

in Nature et Faune (2011), 25(2), 40-45

Forest resources abound in Gabon. Species diversity and quality of trees in the Gabonese forests make it a very lucrative production niche. Even though international forest operators are well established ... [more ▼]

Forest resources abound in Gabon. Species diversity and quality of trees in the Gabonese forests make it a very lucrative production niche. Even though international forest operators are well established there and are making profit, the Gabonese rural communities have not yet developed their own operations. In view of their remoteness from decision-making centers, villagers often unlawfully lose, without being aware of it, a great deal of the riches in their villages. Today, the rural socio-economic component is not sufficiently integrated in the management factors of the resource, even though populations that depend on them daily are supposedly the best placed individuals to make wise use of them. In this sense, community forestry helps to promote sustainable use of forest resources at a scale that is at par with the needs of the community, and seeks to guarantee that profits are shared at village level. In Gabon, the process of legalization of community forests is ongoing since 2001. Pilot projects such as DACEFI (Development of Community Alternatives to Illegal Logging) strive to assist communities in securing their community forest. However their legalization is slow in coming, while logging activities in the rural forest estate are increasing, and the quality of the species is deteriorating continually. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst conclusions from the Belgian stakeholder panel: FP 7 PREPARE, WG 3 “Consumer Goods”
Turcanu, Catrinel; Olyslaegers, Geert; Camps, Johan et al

Conference (2014, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)