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See detailExpression of dentin sialophosphoprotein in human prostate cancer and its correlation with tumor aggressiveness
Chaplet, Michael; Waltregny, David ULg; Detry, Cédric ULg et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2006), 118(4), 850-856

Recent studies have demonstrated that two SIBLING family members, bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN), are overexpressed in human prostate cancer. The expression of these proteins is associated ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have demonstrated that two SIBLING family members, bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN), are overexpressed in human prostate cancer. The expression of these proteins is associated with the acquisition of a metastatic phenotype by cancer cells and a poor prognosis for the patient. Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) shares several structural and genetic features with OPN and BSP. The presence of DSPP has been recently established in salivary glands, indicating that its expression is not restricted to mineralized tissues. However, its potential expression in human tumors has not been addressed yet. In this study, we sought to evaluate the expression of DSPP in human prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 69 prostate cancer specimens using LFMb-21 anti-DSPP monoclonal antibody. All of the prostate cancer lesions examined expressed detectable levels of DSPP, as compared with no or low level of expression in adjacent normal glands (p < 0.0001). High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) glands generally displayed DSPP expression levels that were similar to those found in neighboring cancer glands. DSPP expression was significantly associated with the pathological stage (p = 0.0087) and the Gleason score (p = 0.0176) of the tumors. Western Blot was performed on 5 representative prostate tumor extracts and 3 prostatic tumor cell lines (PC3, LNCaP and DU145). All tumor extracts and cell lines analyzed have been found to express DSPP. In addition, in situ hybridization was used to assess the presence of DSPP mRNA. DSPP was detected at the RNA level in both HGPIN and tumoral glands. This study shows for the first time that DSPP is ectopically expressed in human prostate cancer. The expression of this SIBLING protein strongly correlates with conventional histopathological prognostic indicators of prostate cancer progression. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of different regional patterns of fibronectin immunoreactivity during mesoblast formation in the chick blastoderm
Harrisson, F.; Vanroelen, Ch; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Developmental Biology (1984), 101(2), 373-381

The appearance and distribution of the extracellular material glycoprotein, fibronectin, was investigated in gastrulating chick embryos using affinity-purified anti-human plasma fibronectin antibodies ... [more ▼]

The appearance and distribution of the extracellular material glycoprotein, fibronectin, was investigated in gastrulating chick embryos using affinity-purified anti-human plasma fibronectin antibodies. Preservation of tissue structure and immunoreactivity was carried out by ethanol/acetic acid fixation or by formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde fixation. Using the former fixation method, fibronectin immunoreactivity was detected (1) at the ventral surface of the upper layer or epiblast, mainly anterior and lateral to Hensen's node, in regions where middle-layer or mesoblast cells are not yet present, and (2) sparsely in extracellular spaces of the deep layer. Using the latter fixation method, fibronectin immunoreactivity was, moreover, found at the entire ventral surface of the upper layer, i.e., also at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface, where a basement membrane was previously described. At the light microscope level, we could not detect significant immunoreactivity in the middle layer. Treatment of sections of ethanol-fixed blastoderms with testicular hyaluronidase before immunostaining for fibronectin partially demasked the antigenic sites of this glycoprotein at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface. The present report indicates that the different regional patterns of fibronectin immunoreactivity in the basement membrane of the upper layer are spatially and temporally correlated with migration and positioning of mesoblast cells. These regional patterns are probably due to differences in the composition of fibronectin-associated material such as chondroitin sulfate A and/or C proteoglycans, and/or hyaluronate, before and after mesoblast expansion, rather than to differences in the distribution of fibronectin itself. In this respect, it is noteworthy that the chemical composition of the basement membrane of an epithelium changes as mesenchyme cells migrate over it. The results also favor the idea that fibronectin is a structural component of the whole basement membrane which is used as a substrate for migration of mesenchymal cells. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of functional neurohypophysial peptide receptors by murine immature and cytotoxic T-cell lines
Martens, Henri ULg; Robert, Françoise; Geenen, Vincent ULg et al

in Progress in NeuroEndocrinImmunology (1992), 5

In order to demonstrate the cryptocrine model of neuroendocrine-immune interactions, specific neurohypophysial (NHP) receptors were detected on murine immature pre-T and cytotoxic T cell lines. A computer ... [more ▼]

In order to demonstrate the cryptocrine model of neuroendocrine-immune interactions, specific neurohypophysial (NHP) receptors were detected on murine immature pre-T and cytotoxic T cell lines. A computer analysis (LIGAND) revealed the heterogeneity of the binding sites. The Kd of Highest affinity were equivalent in both cell lines (0.15 nM), but the capacity (Bmax) of both low and high affinity sites was higher in the immature thymic lymphoma-derived pre-T-cell line. The functionality of these receptors was evidenced by their transduction of NHP-related ligands as an increase in intracellular inositol phosphates. These transductory properties were inhibited by a V1 receptor antagonist in pre-T cells, and by an oxytocin (OT) receptor antagonist in cytotoxic T cells. This work supports the involvement of NHP-related ligands and receptors in a process of cryptocrine signaling in the thymus, where the peptide concentration and the receptor affinity are in appropriate concordance. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Galectins in Cancer: A Critical Review
van den Brule, Frédéric; Califice, Stéphane; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in Glycoconjugate Journal (2004), 19(7-9), 537-42

A large body of literature has examined and described galectin expression in cancer. Discrepancies have been observed in the reported data, which hampered clear understanding of the expression profiles ... [more ▼]

A large body of literature has examined and described galectin expression in cancer. Discrepancies have been observed in the reported data, which hampered clear understanding of the expression profiles. This relates to the use of different types of methods that evaluate either global or specific gene expression in heterogeneous cancer tissue samples, type of antibodies used in immunohistochemistry and procedures of comparison of gene expression. In this manuscript, we review the main data concerning expression of galectins in human cancer. Only galectin-1 and galectin-3, the most abundant and examined galectins, will be examined here. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of gelatinases A and B and their tissue inhibitors by cells of early and term human placenta and gestational endometrium
Polette, Myriam; Nawrocki, B.; PINTIAUX, Axelle ULg et al

in Laboratory Investigation : Journal of Technical Methods & Pathology (1994), 71(6), 838-846

BACKGROUND: Human placentation is mediated by fetal trophoblastic cells that invade the maternal uterine endometrium. Trophoblast invasion requires a precisely regulated secretion of specific proteolytic ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Human placentation is mediated by fetal trophoblastic cells that invade the maternal uterine endometrium. Trophoblast invasion requires a precisely regulated secretion of specific proteolytic enzymes able to degrade the endometrial basement membrane and extracellular matrix. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Several studies have documented the key roles of matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in the invasion of various matrices by cultured trophoblasts. In vitro studies suggest that placentation could result from a balance between the secretion of these enzymes by trophoblast cells and their inhibition by the natural tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) produced by maternal decidual cells. The precise localization and levels of expression of these proteins that account for and control invasion during human placentation in vivo however, have not been described. We have evaluated, in vivo, by immunohistochemistry, Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization, the expression of two metalloproteinases (gelatinases A and B) and their two tissue inhibitors (TIMPs 1 and 2) in placental villi and placental beds of first and third trimesters of normal pregnancy. RESULTS: Human first trimester intermediate trophoblast produced both gelatinases A and B; these two gelatinases were respectively less and no more detected at term in these cells. We found that both TIMP1 and 2 were also expressed in maternal decidual cells with a dramatic increase of TIMP1 at the term of pregnancy. In floating villi, gelatinase A and TIMP1 were localized in the stromal compartment, whereas gelatinase B and TIMP2 were codistributed in trophoblast cells. CONCLUSIONS: The gelatinases A and B and their tissue inhibitors are thus expressed by specific cells in early and late placental beds and villi. This pattern of expression varies during pregnancy. Therefore, our morphologic study supports biologic findings suggesting that these proteins may participate in placentation. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Growth Factors and Their Receptors in the Postnatal Rat Cochlea
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Lefebvre, P. P. et al

in Neurochemical Research (1998), 23(8), 1133-8

RT-PCR was used to assay for growth factors and receptors from seven different protein families in cochlea tissues of the juvenile rat. There was a broad representation of the growth factor families in ... [more ▼]

RT-PCR was used to assay for growth factors and receptors from seven different protein families in cochlea tissues of the juvenile rat. There was a broad representation of the growth factor families in all the cochlea tissues examined, though the organ of Corti and stria vascularis expressed a greater variety than the spiral ganglion. This broad expression suggests that a variety of known growth factors play significant roles in the development, maintenance, and repair of the inner ear. The results of this survey serve as a basis for the design of future in vitro experiments that will address the ability of growth factors to protect hair cells from damage and to evoke a repair-regeneration response by injured hair cells. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis during Balb/c ontogeny and effects of GH upon ex-vivo T-cell differentiation
Kermani, Hamid; Goffinet, Lindsay ULg; Mottet, Marie ULg et al

in Neuroimmunomodulation (2012), 19

Aims: We here address the question of expression and role of GH/IGF axis in the thymus. Methods: Using RT-qPCR, the expression profile of various components of the somatotrope GH/IGF axis was measured in ... [more ▼]

Aims: We here address the question of expression and role of GH/IGF axis in the thymus. Methods: Using RT-qPCR, the expression profile of various components of the somatotrope GH/IGF axis was measured in different thymic cell types and during thymus embryogenesis in Balb/c mice. Effect of GH on T-cell differentiation was explored through thymic organotypic culture. Results: Transcription of Gh, Igf1, Igf2 and their related receptors predominantly occurred in thymic epithelial cells (TEC), while a low level of Gh and Igf1r transcription was also evidenced in thymic T cells (thymocytes). Gh, Ghr, Ins2, Igf1, Igf2, and Igfr1, displayed distinct expression profiles depending on the developmental stage. The protein concentration of IGF-1 and IGF-2 were in accordance with the profile of their gene expression. In fetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) derived from Balb/c mice, treatment with exogenous GH resulted in a significant increase of double negative CD4-CD8- T cells and CD4+ T cells, together with a decrease in double positive CD4+CD8+ T cells. These changes were inhibited by concomitant treatment with GH and GHR antagonist pegvisomant. However, GH treatment also induced a significant decrease in FTOC Gh, Ghr and Igf1 expression. Conclusion: These data show that the thymotropic properties of the somatotrope GH/IGF-1 axis involve an interaction between exogenous GH and GHR expressed by TEC. Since thymic IGF-1 is not increased by GH treatment, the effects of GH upon T-cell differentiation could implicate a different local growth factor or cytokine. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Growth Hormone Receptors by Lymphocyte Subpopulations in the Human Tonsil
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Developmental Immunology (1998), 6(3-4), 295-304

The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the ... [more ▼]

The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the receptors, in combination with phenotype markers. Unlike T cells, tonsillar B cells constitutively express the hGH-N receptor. Quiescent cells separated from activated cells by Percoll-gradient centrifugation bear fewer receptors than activated ones. Activated T cells express hGH-N-R, but the typical germinal centre CD4+ CD57+ T cells do not. These latter thus appear not to be fully activated. Inside the lymph follicles, the germinal centre CD38+ B-cell population and the mantle-zone CD39+ B-cell population display similar levels of hGH-N-R expression, but receptor density is lower on dividing dark-zone CD38+ CD10+ B cells. Different lymphoid-cell populations thus differ markedly in their ability to express the growth hormone receptor, in relation notably to their activation status. This highlights the link between the neuroendocrine system and the active immune defense. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of growth hormone receptors by normal or pathological human lymphoid cells.
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Mélot, France ULg et al

Poster (1995)

The human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) is mainly known for its effects on the staturo-ponderal growth and on the lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. It also plays a part in the immune system regulation ... [more ▼]

The human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) is mainly known for its effects on the staturo-ponderal growth and on the lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. It also plays a part in the immune system regulation. According to many authors, hGH-N stimulates the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells or that of tumoral lymphoid cell lines. With the aid of the FACS (Fluorescent-Activated Cell Sorter), we were able to detect hGH-N receptors on various tumoral cell lines : JURKAT (a acute lymphoid leukemia T cell line), DAUDI and RAJI (acute lymphoid leukemia B cell lines). These receptors were nearly absent from quiescent B or T cells prepared from human tonsils but were expressed in culture conditions after activation. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of histone deacetylase 8, a class I histone deacetylase, is restricted to cells showing smooth muscle differentiation in normal human tissues
Waltregny, David ULg; de Leval, Laurence ULg; Glenisson, Wendy et al

in American Journal of Pathology (2004), 165(2), 553-564

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) were originally identified as nuclear enzymes involved in gene transcription regulation. Until recently, it was thought that their activity was restricted within the nucleus ... [more ▼]

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) were originally identified as nuclear enzymes involved in gene transcription regulation. Until recently, it was thought that their activity was restricted within the nucleus, with histones as unique substrates. The demonstration that specific HDACs deacetylate nonhistone proteins, such as p53 and alpha-tubulin, broadened the field of activity of these enzymes. HDAC8, a class I HDAC, is considered to be ubiquitously expressed, as suggested by results of Northern blots performed on tissue RNA extracts, and transfection experiments using various cell lines have indicated that this enzyme may display a prominent nuclear localization. Using immunohistochemistry, we unexpectedly found that, in normal human tissues, HDAC8 is exclusively expressed by cells showing smooth muscle differentiation, including visceral and vascular smooth muscle cells, myoepithelial cells, and myofibroblasts, and is mainly detected in their cytosol. These findings were confirmed in vitro by nucleo-cytoplasmic fractionation and immunoblot experiments performed on human primary smooth muscle cells, and by the cytosolic detection of epitope-tagged HDAC8 overexpressed in fibroblasts. Immunocytochemistry strongly suggested a cytoskeleton-like distribution of the enzyme. Further double-immunofluorescence staining experiments coupled with confocal microscopy analysis showed that epitope-tagged HDAC8 overexpressed in murine fibroblasts formed cytoplasmic stress fiber-like structures that co-localized with the smooth muscle cytoskeleton protein smooth muscle alpha-actin. Our works represent the first demonstration of the restricted expression of a class I HDAC to a specific cell type and indicate that HDAC8, besides being a novel marker of smooth muscle differentiation, may play a role in the biology of these contractile cells. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Hoxa2 in cells entering chondrogenesis impairs overall cartilage development.
Massip, Laurent; Ectors, Fabien ULg; Deprez, Pierre et al

in Differentiation : Research in Biological Diversity (2007), 75(3), 256-67

Vertebrate Hox genes act as developmental architects by patterning embryonic structures like axial skeletal elements, limbs, brainstem territories, or neural crest derivatives. While active during the ... [more ▼]

Vertebrate Hox genes act as developmental architects by patterning embryonic structures like axial skeletal elements, limbs, brainstem territories, or neural crest derivatives. While active during the patterning steps of development, these genes turn out to be down-regulated in specific differentiation programs like that leading to chondrogenesis. To investigate why chondrocyte differentiation is correlated to the silencing of a Hox gene, we generated transgenic mice allowing Cre-mediated conditional misexpression of Hoxa2 and induced this gene in Collagen 2 alpha 1-expressing cells committed to enter chondrogenesis. Persistent Hoxa2 expression in chondrogenic cells resulted in overall chondrodysplasia with delayed cartilage hypertrophy, mineralization, and ossification but without proliferation defects. The absence of skeletal patterning anomaly and the regular migration of precursor cells indicated that the condensation step of chondrogenesis was normal. In contrast, closer examination at the differentiation step showed severely impaired chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, this inhibition affected structures independently of their embryonic origin. In conclusion, for the first time here, by a cell-type specific misexpression, we precisely uncoupled the patterning function of Hoxa2 from its involvement in regulating differentiation programs per se and demonstrate that Hoxa2 displays an anti-chondrogenic activity that is distinct from its patterning function. [less ▲]

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See detailexpression of HSP70 mRNA and protein in rat hippocampus following heat shock
Krueger, Anne-Marie; Plumier, Jean-Christophe ULg; Armstrong, John A. et al

Poster (1997)

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See detailThe expression of IL-1 β, iNOS and COX-2 genes by human chondrocytes is differentially regulated by reactive oxygen species
Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby, GP; Ayache, N et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9SB

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See detailThe expression of IL-1bêta, iNOS and COX-2 genes by human chondrocytes in differentially regulated by reactive oxygen species
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby, GP et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 20

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See detailThe expression of IL-1β, iNOS and COX-2 genes by human chondrocytes is differentially regulated by reactive oxygen species
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Mathy, M; Deby, G et al

in Tissue Engineering (2001), 7

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)