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See detailExpression of Bone Sialoprotein in Human Lung Cancer
Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Maloujahmoum, Naïma ULg; Fisher, L. W. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1997), 61(3), 183-8

Lung cancer belongs to the group of malignant lesions that specifically select bone as secondary implantation site. The molecular bases for this property, defined as osteotropism, is still largely unknown ... [more ▼]

Lung cancer belongs to the group of malignant lesions that specifically select bone as secondary implantation site. The molecular bases for this property, defined as osteotropism, is still largely unknown. The recent demonstration that human breast cancer cells express and attach to bone sialoprotein (BSP), a sulfated phosphoprotein rich in bone and other mineralized tissues, could provide a clue to elucidating bone metastases formation. BSP contains the integrin binding peptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), as well as non-RGD cell attachment domain. Using an immunoperoxidase technique and a specific polyclonal antibody directed against a BSP synthetic peptide, we examined the expression of BSP in 48 lung lesions including 25 squamous carcinoma, 21 adenocarcinoma, and 2 bronchioloalveolar cancers, as well as 38 human ovarian carcinoma that constitute a group of generally nonosteotropic cancers. BSP was not specifically detected in normal lung tissue with the exception of cartilage associated with bronchi. Most of the adenocarcinoma (74%) and all squamous carcinoma of the lung examined exhibited detectable levels of BSP. Staining was mainly cytoplasmic and membrane associated. The two bronchioloalveolar lung cancers examined did not show detectable amounts of BSP. When microcalcifications were observed in pulmonary malignant lesions, they were usually associated with cancer cells expressing BSP. Only 21% of the ovarian cancers examined contained malignant cells with 2+ or 3+ positivity for BSP. We further demonstrated that in 8 of 10 additional lung cancers, BSP was detected at the mRNA level. Our observation is the first demonstration that BSP is expressed in non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung cancer cells are now the second type of osteotropic malignant cells described to express BSP. Added to the observation that BSP expression is not frequent in ovarian carcinoma, a low osteotropic cancer, our study supports our hypothesis that BSP could play a role in determining the affinity of cancer cells to bone. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of bone sialoprotein in human prostate cancer is associated with progression
Waltregny, David ULg; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Van Riet, Ivan et al

in Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research (1998), 39

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See detailExpression of bone sialoprotein in human prostate cancer is associated with progression
Waltregny, David ULg; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Van Riet, Ivan et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1998, January), 53(3), 221-240

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See detailExpression of bone sialoprotein in human prostate is associated with progression
Waltregny, David ULg; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Van Riet, Ivan et al

Conference (1998, January 23)

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See detailExpression of Bone Sialoprotein in Primary Human Breast Cancer Is Associated with Poor Survival
Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Menard, S.; Bufalino, R. et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (1996), 69(4), 350-3

We have recently demonstrated that bone sialoprotein (BSP), a bone-matrix protein involved in hydroxyapatite crystal formation, is ectopically expressed in human breast cancers. We explored a possible ... [more ▼]

We have recently demonstrated that bone sialoprotein (BSP), a bone-matrix protein involved in hydroxyapatite crystal formation, is ectopically expressed in human breast cancers. We explored a possible association between expression of BSP in primary breast cancer and patients' survival. We analyzed BSP expression in 454 breast-cancer patients by immunohistochemistry on archival paraffin-embedded material using an anti-BSP polyclonal antibody. BSP expression was correlated to survival, tumor size, axillary lymph-node status and first site of distant metastasis. Of the breast cancers analyzed, 89% expressed detectable amounts of BSP. We found a statistical association between expression of BSP and poor prognosis as indicated by survival curves analyzed using the log rank and the Gehan methods. BSP expression was significantly higher in breast-cancer patients with axillary lymph-node involvement. Interestingly, survival of patients with positive lymph nodes but BSP-negative tumors was significantly higher than that of patients with no lymph-node involvement but BSP-positive cancers. The frequency of bone metastases was higher in the group of patients with BSP-positive tumors (22%) than in the group with BSP-negative cancers (7%). There was a significant increase in the incidence of lung metastases in patients whose tumors were negative for BSP. Our data show that bone sialoprotein expression in breast cancer is associated with poor prognosis. BSP detection also appears to be a valuable marker with which to identify, among the lymph-node-negative patients, those who have high risk of disease progression. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Bone Sialoprotein, a Bone Matrix Protein, in Human Breast Cancer
Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Merville, Marie-Paule ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in Cancer Research (1994), 54(11), 2823-6

Microcalcifications are often associated with human mammary lesions, particularly with breast carcinomas. To date, the molecular mechanism that leads to the deposition of hydroxyapatite in the mammary ... [more ▼]

Microcalcifications are often associated with human mammary lesions, particularly with breast carcinomas. To date, the molecular mechanism that leads to the deposition of hydroxyapatite in the mammary tissue has not been elucidated. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a glycoprotein the expression of which coincides with the appearance of the first hydroxyapatite crystals during bone development. In this study, we report the observation that BSP, a bone matrix protein, is expressed in human mammary cancer cells. Using an immunoperoxidase technique, we studied the expression of BSP in 79 breast lesions, including 28 benign and 51 malignant specimens. Two polyclonal antibodies, one directed against intact human BSP and the other against a synthetic peptide of BSP (residues 277-294), were used and gave identical results. Normal mammary glands expressed undetectable or barely detectable amounts of BSP, and the majority of the benign lesions examined were generally unstained (0) or weakly stained (1+). Most of the breast carcinoma specimens (around 87%) showed a significant increase (P = 0.0001) in BSP expression. Breast carcinomas with microcalcifications had the highest immunoreactivity (2+ or 3+) to BSP antibodies. This is the first demonstration that BSP expression is significantly increased in breast cancer. Expression of BSP by breast cancer cells could play a major role in the deposition of microcalcifications and in the preferred bone homing of breast cancer cells. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of c-ets-1 mRNA is associated with an invasive, EMT-derived phenotype in breast carcinoma cell lines.
Gilles, Christine ULg; Polette, M.; Birembaut, P. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1997), 15(5), 519-26

We have previously observed in vitro that some stromal proteinases (MMP-2, MT1-MMP) were expressed or activated by invasive carcinoma cell lines exhibiting mesenchymal features, presumably acquired ... [more ▼]

We have previously observed in vitro that some stromal proteinases (MMP-2, MT1-MMP) were expressed or activated by invasive carcinoma cell lines exhibiting mesenchymal features, presumably acquired through an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). To examine the potential contribution of c-ets-1 to this phenotype, we have compared here the expression of c-ets-1 with invasiveness in vitro and expression of vimentin, E-cadherin, uPA, MMP-1 and MMP-3 in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. Our results clearly demonstrate an association between c-ets-1 expression and the invasive, EMT-derived phenotype, which is typified by the expression of vimentin and the lack of E-cadherin. While absent from the two non-invasive, vimentin-negative cell lines, c-ets-1 was abundantly expressed in all the four vimentin-positive lines. However, we could not find a clear quantitative or qualitative relationship between the expression of c-ets-1 and the three proteinases known to be regulated by c-ets-1, except that when they were expressed, it was only in the invasive c-ets-1-positive lines. UPA mRNAs were found in three of the four vimentin-positive lines, MMP-1 in two of the four, and MMP-3 could not be detected in any of the cell lines. Intriguingly, MDA-MB-435 cells, which exhibit the highest metastatic potential of these cell lines in nude mice, expressed vimentin and c-ets-1, but lacked expression of these three proteinases, at least under the culture conditions employed. Taken together, our results show that c-ets-1 expression is associated with an invasive, EMT-derived phenotype in breast cancer cells, although it is apparently not sufficient to ensure the expression of uPA, MMP-1 or MMP-3, in the vimentin-positive cells. Such proteases regulation is undoubtedly qualified by the cellular context. This study therefore advances our understanding of the molecular regulation of invasiveness in EMT-associated carcinoma progression, and suggests that c-ets-1 may contribute to the invasive phenotype in carcinoma cells. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of c-inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2 in the sputum from asthmatic patients
Bureau, Fabrice ULg; Seumois, G.; Jaspar, F. et al

in Proceedings : 11th European Respiratory Society Annual Congress, Eur. Respir. J., 2001, 18 (Suppl. 33) (2001)

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See detailThe expression of Clostridium perfringens consensus beta2 toxin is associated with bovine enterotoxaemia syndrome
Lebrun, Maud; Filée, Patrice ULg; Mousset, Bénédicte ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2007), 120(1-2), 151-157

Clostridium perfringens has been implicated in a broad array of enteric infections including the fatal haemorrhagic enteritis/enterotoxaemia syndrome in cattle. The beta2 toxin (CPB2), encoded by cpb2, is ... [more ▼]

Clostridium perfringens has been implicated in a broad array of enteric infections including the fatal haemorrhagic enteritis/enterotoxaemia syndrome in cattle. The beta2 toxin (CPB2), encoded by cpb2, is suspected to be implicated in this syndrome. However, among C. perfringens isolates from cattle suspected of clostridial disease, an atypical allele was recently found to predominate at the cpb2 locus and atypical corresponding CPB2 proteins were shown to be poorly expressed, thus arguing against a biologically significant role of the beta2 toxin in clostridial diseases in cattle. This study compared genotype and phenotype of the beta2 toxin between C. perfringens isolates from a group of healthy calves (n = 14, 87 isolates) and from a group of enterotoxaemic calves (n = 8,41 isolates). PCR results revealed the exclusive presence of the typical "consensus" cpb2 in the enterotoxaernic group. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the typical variant of CPB2 was often expressed in isolates from enterotoxaemic calves (43.9%) and infrequently in isolates from healthy cattle (6.9%). These data suggest that the typical variant of the CPB2 toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of cattle enterotoxaemia. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Cu/Zn and Mn superoxide dismutases during bovine embryo development: influence of in vitro culture.
Lequarré, Anne-Sophie ULg; Feugang, Jean-Magloire; Malhomme, Olivier et al

in Molecular Reproduction and Development (2001), 58(1), 45-53

Temporal pattern of expression of Cu/Zn and Mn superoxide dismutases (SODs) was investigated in bovine oocytes and embryos produced in vitro in two different culture conditions and in vivo after ... [more ▼]

Temporal pattern of expression of Cu/Zn and Mn superoxide dismutases (SODs) was investigated in bovine oocytes and embryos produced in vitro in two different culture conditions and in vivo after superovulation. SODs were examined at a transcriptional level in single oocytes and embryos by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and, at a protein level, by Western blotting on pools of embryos. mRNA encoding Cu/Zn SOD were detected in in vitro bovine embryos throughout preattachment development as well as in in vivo derived morulae and blastocysts. Transcripts for Mn SOD gene were detected in most immature and in vitro matured oocytes as well as in some zygotes and 5- to 8-cell embryos while no transcript was found at the 9-to 16-cell stage in both culture conditions. In vitro embryonic expression of Mn SOD was detected earlier in the presence of serum. Half of the morulae showed the transcript if cultured with 5% serum while none without serum. At the blastocyst stage Mn SOD could be detected independently of culture conditions. For in vivo-derived embryos Mn SOD transcripts were detected both in morulae and blastocysts. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that Cu/Zn SOD and Mn SOD were also present at a protein level in in vitro-derived zygotes and blastocysts. Together these data demonstrate, for the first time, that Mn SOD is transcribed and that Cu/Zn and Mn SOD proteins are expressed in preimplantation bovine embryos. Finally, they suggest that Mn SOD transcription is altered by in vitro culture conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of dentin sialophosphoprotein in human prostate cancer and its correlation with tumor aggressiveness
Waltregny, David ULg; Chaplet, Michael; Detry, Cédric et al

Conference (2005)

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See detailExpression of dentin sialophosphoprotein in human prostate cancer and its correlation with tumor aggressiveness
Chaplet, Michael; Waltregny, David ULg; Detry, Cédric ULg et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2006), 118(4), 850-856

Recent studies have demonstrated that two SIBLING family members, bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN), are overexpressed in human prostate cancer. The expression of these proteins is associated ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have demonstrated that two SIBLING family members, bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN), are overexpressed in human prostate cancer. The expression of these proteins is associated with the acquisition of a metastatic phenotype by cancer cells and a poor prognosis for the patient. Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) shares several structural and genetic features with OPN and BSP. The presence of DSPP has been recently established in salivary glands, indicating that its expression is not restricted to mineralized tissues. However, its potential expression in human tumors has not been addressed yet. In this study, we sought to evaluate the expression of DSPP in human prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 69 prostate cancer specimens using LFMb-21 anti-DSPP monoclonal antibody. All of the prostate cancer lesions examined expressed detectable levels of DSPP, as compared with no or low level of expression in adjacent normal glands (p < 0.0001). High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) glands generally displayed DSPP expression levels that were similar to those found in neighboring cancer glands. DSPP expression was significantly associated with the pathological stage (p = 0.0087) and the Gleason score (p = 0.0176) of the tumors. Western Blot was performed on 5 representative prostate tumor extracts and 3 prostatic tumor cell lines (PC3, LNCaP and DU145). All tumor extracts and cell lines analyzed have been found to express DSPP. In addition, in situ hybridization was used to assess the presence of DSPP mRNA. DSPP was detected at the RNA level in both HGPIN and tumoral glands. This study shows for the first time that DSPP is ectopically expressed in human prostate cancer. The expression of this SIBLING protein strongly correlates with conventional histopathological prognostic indicators of prostate cancer progression. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of different regional patterns of fibronectin immunoreactivity during mesoblast formation in the chick blastoderm
Harrisson, F.; Vanroelen, Ch; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Developmental Biology (1984), 101(2), 373-381

The appearance and distribution of the extracellular material glycoprotein, fibronectin, was investigated in gastrulating chick embryos using affinity-purified anti-human plasma fibronectin antibodies ... [more ▼]

The appearance and distribution of the extracellular material glycoprotein, fibronectin, was investigated in gastrulating chick embryos using affinity-purified anti-human plasma fibronectin antibodies. Preservation of tissue structure and immunoreactivity was carried out by ethanol/acetic acid fixation or by formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde fixation. Using the former fixation method, fibronectin immunoreactivity was detected (1) at the ventral surface of the upper layer or epiblast, mainly anterior and lateral to Hensen's node, in regions where middle-layer or mesoblast cells are not yet present, and (2) sparsely in extracellular spaces of the deep layer. Using the latter fixation method, fibronectin immunoreactivity was, moreover, found at the entire ventral surface of the upper layer, i.e., also at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface, where a basement membrane was previously described. At the light microscope level, we could not detect significant immunoreactivity in the middle layer. Treatment of sections of ethanol-fixed blastoderms with testicular hyaluronidase before immunostaining for fibronectin partially demasked the antigenic sites of this glycoprotein at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface. The present report indicates that the different regional patterns of fibronectin immunoreactivity in the basement membrane of the upper layer are spatially and temporally correlated with migration and positioning of mesoblast cells. These regional patterns are probably due to differences in the composition of fibronectin-associated material such as chondroitin sulfate A and/or C proteoglycans, and/or hyaluronate, before and after mesoblast expansion, rather than to differences in the distribution of fibronectin itself. In this respect, it is noteworthy that the chemical composition of the basement membrane of an epithelium changes as mesenchyme cells migrate over it. The results also favor the idea that fibronectin is a structural component of the whole basement membrane which is used as a substrate for migration of mesenchymal cells. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of functional neurohypophysial peptide receptors by murine immature and cytotoxic T-cell lines
Martens, Henri ULg; Robert, Françoise; Geenen, Vincent ULg et al

in Progress in NeuroEndocrinImmunology (1992), 5

In order to demonstrate the cryptocrine model of neuroendocrine-immune interactions, specific neurohypophysial (NHP) receptors were detected on murine immature pre-T and cytotoxic T cell lines. A computer ... [more ▼]

In order to demonstrate the cryptocrine model of neuroendocrine-immune interactions, specific neurohypophysial (NHP) receptors were detected on murine immature pre-T and cytotoxic T cell lines. A computer analysis (LIGAND) revealed the heterogeneity of the binding sites. The Kd of Highest affinity were equivalent in both cell lines (0.15 nM), but the capacity (Bmax) of both low and high affinity sites was higher in the immature thymic lymphoma-derived pre-T-cell line. The functionality of these receptors was evidenced by their transduction of NHP-related ligands as an increase in intracellular inositol phosphates. These transductory properties were inhibited by a V1 receptor antagonist in pre-T cells, and by an oxytocin (OT) receptor antagonist in cytotoxic T cells. This work supports the involvement of NHP-related ligands and receptors in a process of cryptocrine signaling in the thymus, where the peptide concentration and the receptor affinity are in appropriate concordance. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Galectins in Cancer: A Critical Review
van den Brule, Frédéric; Califice, Stéphane; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in Glycoconjugate Journal (2004), 19(7-9), 537-42

A large body of literature has examined and described galectin expression in cancer. Discrepancies have been observed in the reported data, which hampered clear understanding of the expression profiles ... [more ▼]

A large body of literature has examined and described galectin expression in cancer. Discrepancies have been observed in the reported data, which hampered clear understanding of the expression profiles. This relates to the use of different types of methods that evaluate either global or specific gene expression in heterogeneous cancer tissue samples, type of antibodies used in immunohistochemistry and procedures of comparison of gene expression. In this manuscript, we review the main data concerning expression of galectins in human cancer. Only galectin-1 and galectin-3, the most abundant and examined galectins, will be examined here. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of gelatinases A and B and their tissue inhibitors by cells of early and term human placenta and gestational endometrium
Polette, Myriam; Nawrocki, B.; PINTIAUX, Axelle ULg et al

in Laboratory Investigation : Journal of Technical Methods & Pathology (1994), 71(6), 838-846

BACKGROUND: Human placentation is mediated by fetal trophoblastic cells that invade the maternal uterine endometrium. Trophoblast invasion requires a precisely regulated secretion of specific proteolytic ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Human placentation is mediated by fetal trophoblastic cells that invade the maternal uterine endometrium. Trophoblast invasion requires a precisely regulated secretion of specific proteolytic enzymes able to degrade the endometrial basement membrane and extracellular matrix. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Several studies have documented the key roles of matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in the invasion of various matrices by cultured trophoblasts. In vitro studies suggest that placentation could result from a balance between the secretion of these enzymes by trophoblast cells and their inhibition by the natural tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) produced by maternal decidual cells. The precise localization and levels of expression of these proteins that account for and control invasion during human placentation in vivo however, have not been described. We have evaluated, in vivo, by immunohistochemistry, Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization, the expression of two metalloproteinases (gelatinases A and B) and their two tissue inhibitors (TIMPs 1 and 2) in placental villi and placental beds of first and third trimesters of normal pregnancy. RESULTS: Human first trimester intermediate trophoblast produced both gelatinases A and B; these two gelatinases were respectively less and no more detected at term in these cells. We found that both TIMP1 and 2 were also expressed in maternal decidual cells with a dramatic increase of TIMP1 at the term of pregnancy. In floating villi, gelatinase A and TIMP1 were localized in the stromal compartment, whereas gelatinase B and TIMP2 were codistributed in trophoblast cells. CONCLUSIONS: The gelatinases A and B and their tissue inhibitors are thus expressed by specific cells in early and late placental beds and villi. This pattern of expression varies during pregnancy. Therefore, our morphologic study supports biologic findings suggesting that these proteins may participate in placentation. [less ▲]

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