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See detailFirst results of the HssO key programme
Hartogh, Paul; Crovisier, Jacques; Lellouch et al

in 38th COSPAR Scientific Assembly (2010)

The HssO (Herschel solar system Observations) program aims at determining the distribution, the evolution and the origin of water in Mars, the Outer Planets, Titan, Enceladus and comets, using the three ... [more ▼]

The HssO (Herschel solar system Observations) program aims at determining the distribution, the evolution and the origin of water in Mars, the Outer Planets, Titan, Enceladus and comets, using the three Herschel instruments HIFI, PACS and SPIRE. It addresses the broad topic of water and its isotopologues in planetary and cometary atmospheres. The nature of cometary activity and the thermodynamics of cometary comae will be investigated by studying water excitation in a sample of comets. The D/H ratio, the key parameter for constraining the origin and evolution of Solar System materials, will be measured for the first time in a Jupiter family comet. A comparison with existing and new measurements of D/H in Oort cloud comets will constrain the composition of pre-solar cometary grains and possibly the dynamics of the protosolar nebula. New measurements of D/H in Giant Planets, similarly constraining the composition of proto-planetary ices, will be obtained. The D/H and other isotopic ratios, diagnostics of the evolution of Mars atmosphere, will be accurately measured in H2O and CO. The role of water vapour in the atmospheric chemistry of Mars will be studied by monitoring vertical profiles of H2O and HDO and by searching for several other species (including CO and H2O isotopologues). A detailed study of the source of water in the upper atmosphere of the Giant Planets and Titan will be performed. By monitoring the water abundance, vertical profile, and input fluxes in the various objects, and when possible with the help of mapping observations, we will discriminate between the possible sources of water in the Outer Planets (interplanetary dust particles, cometary impacts, and local sources). First results on comets, Mars and the outer planets will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst results on Martian carbon monoxide from Herschel/HIFI observations
Hartogh, P.; Błecka, M. I.; Jarchow, C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 521

We report on the initial analysis of Herschel/HIFI carbon monoxide (CO) observations of the Martian atmosphere performed between 11 and 16 April 2010. We selected the (7-6) rotational transitions of the ... [more ▼]

We report on the initial analysis of Herschel/HIFI carbon monoxide (CO) observations of the Martian atmosphere performed between 11 and 16 April 2010. We selected the (7-6) rotational transitions of the isotopes [SUP]13[/SUP]CO at 771 GHz and C[SUP]18[/SUP]O and 768 GHz in order to retrieve the mean vertical profile of temperature and the mean volume mixing ratio of carbon monoxide. The derived temperature profile agrees within less than 5 K with general circulation model (GCM) predictions up to an altitude of 45 km, however, show about 12-15 K lower values at 60 km. The CO mixing ratio was determined as 980 ± 150 ppm, in agreement with the 900 ppm derived from Herschel/SPIRE observations in November 2009. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst results on the development of an in ovulo culture technique of globular embryo in Phaseolus
Dherte, O; Mergeai, Guy ULg; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg

in Belgian Plant Tissue Culture Group (1996)

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See detailFirst results on the evaluation of Haser scale lengths in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) at R >= 3 AU
Helbert, J.; Rauer, H.; Arpigny, Claude ULg et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (1998, September 01)

Due to its exceptional brightness, comet Hale-Bopp offered the possibility for unprecedented long-term monitoring. Medium resolution long-slit spectroscopic data and images were obtained using the Danish ... [more ▼]

Due to its exceptional brightness, comet Hale-Bopp offered the possibility for unprecedented long-term monitoring. Medium resolution long-slit spectroscopic data and images were obtained using the Danish Faint Object Spectrograph (DFOSC) at the 1.54m Danish telescope and the Boller and Chivens spectrograph at the 1.52m ESO telescope, La Silla, Chile. Pre-perihelion, comet Hale-Bopp was monitored from 4.6 AU to 2.9 AU and post-perihelion, the monitoring yields data from 3 AU up to a heliocentric distance of 5 AU. Production rates are often derived by using a simple Haser model to approximate the coma density distribution. This requires knowledge of the destruction scale lengths of the observed daughter species and its parents. As the brightness of most comets diminishes quickly with heliocentric distance, scale lengths have been determined only in comets around 1 AU. Due to the lack of data for large heliocentric distances, production rates in distant comets can only be derived by extrapolating these scale lengths. In this preliminary analysis of our data we evaluate the scale-lengths of CN, C_3 C_2, and NH_2 at heliocentric distances greater than 3 AU post-perihelion. The differences of production rates derived by using these directly determined and the extrapolated scale lengths are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst results on the optical campaign devoted to the gamma-ray binary candidate HD259440
De Becker, Michaël ULg; McSwain, M Virginia; Aragona, Christina

in Bulletin de la Societe Royale des Sciences de Liege (2011), 80

Quite recently, a very high-energy gamma-ray source has been detected in the Monoceros region. This source belongs to the category of TeV emitters with no identified counterpart at other wavelengths, even ... [more ▼]

Quite recently, a very high-energy gamma-ray source has been detected in the Monoceros region. This source belongs to the category of TeV emitters with no identified counterpart at other wavelengths, even though it may be coincident with other high-energy sources detected with other observatories (ROSAT, CGRO). However, it is interesting to note that the error box of this TeV source admits the possibility that the Be star HD259440 is at the origin of the high-energy emission. This may be possible only if that Be star is member of a still undetected binary system including a compact (neutron star or black hole) companion, therefore belonging to the very scarce category of gamma-ray binaries. We describe here the first results of the optical campaign devoted to HD 259440, with emphasis on the investigation of its multiplicity, using spectra obtained at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP) and at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). [less ▲]

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See detailFirst retrievals of carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) from ground-based FTIR measurements: production and analysis of the two-decadal time series above the Jungfraujoch
Duchatelet, Pierre ULg; Zander, Rodolphe ULg; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011)

Carbon tetrafluoride (CF4 or PFC-14) is a potent greenhouse gas that is almost 7400 times more effective (100-yr horizon) than CO2 on a per molecule basis (IPCC, 2007). This high global warming potential ... [more ▼]

Carbon tetrafluoride (CF4 or PFC-14) is a potent greenhouse gas that is almost 7400 times more effective (100-yr horizon) than CO2 on a per molecule basis (IPCC, 2007). This high global warming potential, coming from its medium absorbance combined with a very long atmospheric lifetime (>50000 years; Ravishankara et al., 1993), makes CF4 a key species among the various greenhouse gases targeted by the Kyoto Protocol. In the Northern hemisphere, current atmospheric CF4 concentrations are close to 78 pptv, with a large fraction (around 35 pptv, Mühle et al., 2010) coming from natural processes like lithospheric emissions (Harnisch and Eisenhauer, 1998). In addition, CF4 has been used increasingly since the eighties in electronic and semiconductors industry. The primary aluminum production processes have also been clearly identified as an important anthropogenic source of CF4 emissions. The partitioning between these two main sources is however problematic, principally due to lacking or incomplete CF4 emission factors from inventories performed in industrial fields (e.g. International Aluminum Institute, 2009). Recent in situ ground level measurements of CF4 in the Northern hemisphere (Khalil et al., 2003; Mühle et al., 2010) or remotely from space (Rinsland et al., 2006) have indicated a significant slowdown in the increase rate of atmospheric CF4. This probably results from measures adopted by the aluminum industry aiming at the reduction of the frequency and duration of “anode effects” and therefore of related PFCs emissions (International Aluminum Institute, 2009). The present contribution reports on the long-term evolution (1990-2010) of the atmospheric carbon tetrafluoride total vertical abundance derived from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar spectroscopy observations around 1285 cm-1 at the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8.0°E, 3580m asl) and compares our findings with results available in the literature. To our knowledge, no equivalent time series (i.e. based on ground-based FTIR technique) has been published to date. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst retrievals of HCFC-142b from ground-based high resolution FTIR solar observations: application to high altitude Jungfraujoch spectra
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; O'Doherty, Simon; Reimann, Stefan et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2013), 15

Hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are the first substitutes to the long-lived ozone depleting halocarbons, in particular the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Given the complete ban of the CFCs by the Montreal ... [more ▼]

Hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are the first substitutes to the long-lived ozone depleting halocarbons, in particular the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Given the complete ban of the CFCs by the Montreal Protocol, its Amendments and Adjustments, HCFCs are on the rise, with current rates of increase substantially larger than at the beginning of the 21st century. HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) is presently the second most abundant HCFC, after HCFC-22 (CHClF2). It is used in a wide range of applications, including as a blowing foam agent, in refrigeration and air-conditioning. Its concentration will soon reach 25 ppt in the northern hemisphere, with mixing ratios increasing at about 1.1 ppt/yr [Montzka et al., 2011]. The HCFC-142b lifetime is estimated at 18 years. With a global warming potential of 2310 on a 100-yr horizon, this species is also a potent greenhouse gas [Forster et al., 2007]. First space-based retrievals of HCFC-142b have been reported by Dufour et al. [2005]. 17 occultations recorded in 2004 by the Canadian ACE-FTS instrument (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment – Fourier Transform Spectrometer, onboard SCISAT-1) were analyzed, using two microwindows (1132.5–1135.5 and 1191.5–1195.5 cm-1). In 2009, Rinsland et al. determined the HCFC-142b trend near the tropopause, from the analysis of ACE-FTS observations recorded over the 2004–2008 time period. The spectral region used in this study extended from 903 to 905.5 cm-1. In this contribution, we will present the first HCFC-142b measurements from ground-based high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar spectra. We use observations recorded at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8°E, 3580 m asl), with a Bruker 120HR instrument, in the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, visit http://www.ndacc.org). The retrieval of HCFC-142b is very challenging, with simulations indicating only weak absorptions, lower than 1% for low sun spectra and current concentrations. Among the four microwindows tested, the region extending from 900 to 906 cm-1 proved to be the most appropriate, with limited interferences, in particular from water vapor. A total column time series spanning the 2004-2012 time period will be presented, analyzed and critically discussed. After conversion of our total columns to concentrations, we will compare our results with in situ measurements performed in the northern hemisphere by the AGAGE network. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst retrievals of methyl chloride from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Harrison, Jeremy; Bernath, Peter F. et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011), 13

Methyl chloride (CH3Cl) is one of the most abundant chlorine-bearing gas in the Earth’s troposphere and a significant contributor to the organic chlorine budget. Measurements by in situ networks indicate ... [more ▼]

Methyl chloride (CH3Cl) is one of the most abundant chlorine-bearing gas in the Earth’s troposphere and a significant contributor to the organic chlorine budget. Measurements by in situ networks indicate a mean volume mixing ratio of 550 pptv, with a significant seasonal cycle of about 80 pptv, peak to peak. This species also exhibits inter-annual variability, but no long-term trend. Major sources are from tropical and sub-tropical plants and dead leaves, the oceans and biomass burning. Some industrial processes and waste incineration further add to the emissions. Oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is by far the largest CH3Cl sink, followed by soil uptake. Although balanced, its atmospheric budget is still affected by large uncertainties and contributions from unidentified sources and sinks cannot be ruled out. Methyl chloride has an atmospheric lifetime of 1 year, a global warming potential of 13 (100-yr horizon) and an ozone depleting potential of 0.02. The retrieval of methyl chloride from ground-based infrared (IR) spectra is very challenging. Indeed, numerous interferences by strong water vapor and methane lines complicate the detection of small CH3Cl absorptions, close to 1%, near 3 microns. In addition, and although weak, ethane features contribute to the difficulty, in particular since a significant number of ethane branches were absent until very recently from official HITRAN compilations. Therefore, the scientific literature does not report thus far about any investigations of CH3Cl from ground-based remote sensing observations. In this contribution, we will present first CH3Cl total column retrievals, using the SFIT-2 algorithm (v3.94) and high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar absorption observations recorded with a Bruker 120HR instrument, at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8°E, 3580 m asl), within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, visit http://www.ndacc.org). In our retrievals, we use new ethane absorption cross sections recorded at the Molecular Spectroscopy Facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Harrison et al., 2010). They were calibrated in intensity by using reference low-resolution spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database. These new cross sections were recently released as a HITRAN update (see http://www.hitran.com). Pseudoline parameters fitted to these ethane spectra have been combined with HITRAN 2004 line parameters (including all the 2006 updates) for all other species encompassed in the selected microwindows, including our target CH3Cl. We will evaluate the improvement brought by the new ethane line parameters on the fitting residuals, and characterize the quality, the precision and the reliability of the retrieved product. If successful, a long-term CH3Cl total column time series will be produced using the Jungfraujoch observational database, and we will perform preliminary investigations of the seasonal and inter-annual variations of methyl chloride total columns at northern mid-latitudes. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst space-based derivation of the global atmospheric methanol emission fluxes
Stavrakou, T.; Guenther, A.; Razavi, A. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2011), 11

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See detailFirst space-based observations of formic acid (HCOOH): Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment austral spring 2004 and 2005 Southern Hemisphere tropical-mid-latitude upper tropospheric measurements
Rinsland, Curtis P.; Boone, Christopher D.; Bernath, Peter F. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2006), 33(23),

The first space-based measurements of upper tropospheric ( 110 - 300 hPa) formic acid (HCOOH) are reported from 0.02 cm(-1) resolution Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Fourier transform spectrometer ... [more ▼]

The first space-based measurements of upper tropospheric ( 110 - 300 hPa) formic acid (HCOOH) are reported from 0.02 cm(-1) resolution Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Fourier transform spectrometer solar occultation measurements at 16 degrees S - 43 degrees S latitude during late September to early October in 2004 and 2005. A maximum upper tropospheric HCOOH mixing ratio of 3.13 +/- 0.02 ppbv ( 1 ppbv = 10(-9) per unit volume), 1 sigma, at 10.5 km altitude was measured during 2004 at 29.97 degrees S latitude and a lower maximum HCOOH mixing ratio of 2.03 +/- 0.28 ppbv, at 9.5 km altitude was measured during 2005. Fire counts, back trajectories, and correlations of HCOOH mixing ratios with ACE simultaneous measurements of other fire products confirm the elevated HCOOH mixing ratios originated primarily from tropical fire emissions. A HCOOH emission factor relative to CO of 1.99 +/- 1.34 g kg(-1) during 2004 in upper tropospheric plumes is inferred from a comparison with lower mixing ratios measured during the same time period assuming HITRAN 2004 spectroscopic parameters. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst spectroscopic evidence of microlensing on a BAL quasar? The case of H 1413 + 117
Angonin, M.-C.; Vanderriest, C.; Remy, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (1990), 233

New data has been obtained for the quadruply lensed quasar H 1413 + 117 using the bidimensional spectrograph SILFID at the CFH telescope. The spectra recorded for each of the four individual images turn ... [more ▼]

New data has been obtained for the quadruply lensed quasar H 1413 + 117 using the bidimensional spectrograph SILFID at the CFH telescope. The spectra recorded for each of the four individual images turn out to be quite similar, except for the narrow absorption line systems (probably related to the lenses) seen in images A and B and for marked differences in the spectrum of image D. When compared to the three other images, the spectrum of D shows smaller values for the emission lines/continuum ratio and a larger equivalent width for absorption features located in the blueshifted P Cygni profile. The possible explanations of these observations are briefly discussed in terms of micro-lensing and/or intrinsic variability of the source. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst spike latency sensitivity of spiking neuron models
Trotta, Laura ULg; Franci, Alessio ULg; Sepulchre, Rodolphe ULg

Poster (2013, July 08)

First spike latency is the long-lasting period preceding the first spike of a neuron submitted to a super-threshold stimulus. It has been suggested that this latency could code for stimulus recognition in ... [more ▼]

First spike latency is the long-lasting period preceding the first spike of a neuron submitted to a super-threshold stimulus. It has been suggested that this latency could code for stimulus recognition in several sensory systems. To encode information reliably, first spike latency should be sensitive to sensory inputs but robust to external perturbations. This paper studies the robustness of the first spike latency in spiking neuron models. We show the interplay between bistability, first spike latency and a type of neuronal excitability called regenerative excitability. [less ▲]

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See detailA FIRST STEP TOWARD A CLOSE PROXIMITY NOISE MAP
Bueno, M.; Vinuela, U.; Teran, F. et al

Conference (2008)

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See detailA first step towards a real-time predictive yield support system.
Dumont, Benjamin ULg; Leemans, Vincent ULg; Ferrandis Vallterra, Salvador ULg et al

in Agriculture & Engineering for a Healthier Life (2012)

Real-time non-invasive determination of crop biomass and yield prediction are maybe among the major challenges in agriculture. But unknown future weather remains the key point of accurate yield forecast ... [more ▼]

Real-time non-invasive determination of crop biomass and yield prediction are maybe among the major challenges in agriculture. But unknown future weather remains the key point of accurate yield forecast. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that aims to supply the unknown future by daily mean climatic data. The results show that, under the Belgian weather, this approach is relevant. Furthermore, the developed methodology appears to be a powerful diagnosis tool of the remaining yield potential under ongoing weather. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst steps in the development of a piston sensor for large aperture space telescopes
Guerri, Géraldine ULg; Roose, Stéphane ULg; Stockman, Yvan ULg et al

in Oschmann, J.; Clampin, M.; MacEwen, H. (Eds.) Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave (2010, July 01)

Nowadays spaceborne missions for astronomy or Earth imaging need high resolution observation which implies the development of large aperture telescopes. This can be achieved by multi-aperture telescopes ... [more ▼]

Nowadays spaceborne missions for astronomy or Earth imaging need high resolution observation which implies the development of large aperture telescopes. This can be achieved by multi-aperture telescopes or large segmented telescopes. One of the major issues is the phasing of the sub-apertures or the segments of such telescopes. A cophasing sensor is therefore mandatory to achieve the ultimate resolution of these telescopes. In this framework, Liège Space Center (CSL) concern is the development of a compact cophasing sensor to phase new large lightweight segmented mirrors for future space telescopes. The sensor concept has its origins in new phase retrieval algorithms which have been recently developed. In this paper, we outline the concept and the experimental validation results of our piston sensor breadboard which is currently under development in our laboratory. Finally, future prospects and further developments of our experiment are presented. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst steps of a new methodology for integrating ground-based ozone profile data
Pastel, M.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg et al

Poster (2012, August)

A new methodology is developed for integrating complementary ground-based data sources to provide consistent ozone vertical distribution time series as well as tropospheric and stratospheric ozone partial ... [more ▼]

A new methodology is developed for integrating complementary ground-based data sources to provide consistent ozone vertical distribution time series as well as tropospheric and stratospheric ozone partial columns. Primary results are presented for the Alpine station of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes (NDACC). Ozone measurements from the lidar at Haute-Provence Observatory, the microwave spectrometer at Bern and the FTIR spectrometer at the Jungfrauch station are used for this purpose. First step is to evaluate the validity domain of ozone profile data considered here by assessing instrumental error and vertical resolution. Each instrument has its own vertical resolution; therefore adjustments need to be done for the creation of an homogeneous data set. Indeed, because of the higher resolution of lidar measurements, smoothing of the data is necessary for the comparison with FTIR and microwave measurements. However, smoothing the data induces a loss of scientific information. Therefore a compromise has to be established and discussed. The various intercomparisons provide an evaluation of the differences due to instrumental error and atmospheric variability. The statistical method used for combining the different measurements in order to obtain ozone vertical profile time series consistent with total ozone measurements is then discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst steps to model milk urea in a management perspective
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gillon, Alain ULg; Laloux, Laurent et al

Conference (2007, July)

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See detailFirst steps to model milk urea in a management perspective
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gillon, Alain ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Journal of Dairy Science (2007), 90 - Suppl 1

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See detailFirst steps towards an explicit modeling of aba production and translocation in relation with the water uptake dynamics
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Pagès, Loic; Draye, Xavier

in Acta Horticulturae (2013), 991

Water flow in the plant continuum is thought to be controlled by the leaf, xylem and the root radial conductances. Leaf conductance is widely recognized as the master control in the system as it can act ... [more ▼]

Water flow in the plant continuum is thought to be controlled by the leaf, xylem and the root radial conductances. Leaf conductance is widely recognized as the master control in the system as it can act as a switch in the water flow, even under high transpiration demand. The control of the stomatal aperture by the plant has been the object of numerous research projects since decades and different models have been developed to study stomatal regulation. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) produced in the leaves acts as an endogenous signal triggering stomatal closure, but is also thought to act as a long distance signal that is produced by roots experiencing water deficit. However, the relative contributions of leaf-supplied ABA, root-supplied ABA and xylem water potential in the regulation of water flow remains a matter of controversy. Using a novel functional structural plant model (PlaNet-Maize-ABA), we report here a first attempt to explicitly simulate ABA production, degradation, translocation in all plant organs and their effect on the transpiration flow. [less ▲]

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