Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Peer Reviewed
See detailFalse memory and surprise: round #3
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2008, May)

Three experiments examined the links between surprise feeling and a false memory phenomenon, the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) effect. In DRM paradigm, subjects studied lists of related words (NIGHT ... [more ▼]

Three experiments examined the links between surprise feeling and a false memory phenomenon, the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) effect. In DRM paradigm, subjects studied lists of related words (NIGHT, DREAM, etc.) that were associated with non-presented critical word (e.g., SLEEP) for which high false recognition rate is after noted. Roediger and coll. (in press) suggested that this effect occur because critical words are highly activated by their semantic association with words that are in the list. Whittlesea et al. (2005) proposed an alternative explanation, based on the discrepancy-attribution hypothesis. According to that account, false recognition results when a feeling of surprise comes from a discrepancy between subject’s expectation about processing fluency and real processing fluency. When Whittlesea and coll. have provided a range of evidences for this account, Roediger and coll. found that subjects were not surprised when they encountered non-presented critical word during recognition test. We explained these discrepant findings by methodology differences between these two studies. Whittlesea et al. noted that various procedures that eliminate surprise eliminate the false memories. However, they used a modified DRM procedure (e.g., RSVP presentations and recognition judgment for each critical word directly after the study of each list of related words). In contrast, Roediger and coll. used a classical DRM procedure but did not eliminate surprise feeling. Rather, they investigated whether subjects experienced the critical word as surprising by asking them to make judgments of surprise on a recognition test. In this study, we used various procedures that eliminate surprise like Whittlesea but we used classical DRM paradigm like Roediger. Experiment 1 replicates the DRM effect. Experiment 2 & 3 shows that the DRM effect is decreased but not abolished when participants are prevented from being surprised by critical word. It is proposed that experience of surprise participate to DRM effect, but not alone. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFalse phylogenies on wood mice due to cryptic cytochrome-b pseudogene.
Dubey, Sylvain; Michaux, Johan ULg; Brunner, Harald et al

in Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution (2009), 50(3), 633-41

The phylogeny and phylogeography of the Old World wood mice (subgenus Sylvaemus, genus Apodemus, Muridae) are well-documented. Nevertheless, the distributions of species, such as A. fulvipectus and A ... [more ▼]

The phylogeny and phylogeography of the Old World wood mice (subgenus Sylvaemus, genus Apodemus, Muridae) are well-documented. Nevertheless, the distributions of species, such as A. fulvipectus and A. ponticus remain dubious, as well as their phylogenetic relationships with A. sylvaticus. We analysed samples of Apodemus spp. across Europe using the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene (cyt-b) and compared the DNA and amino-acid compositions of previously published sequences. The main result stemming from this study is the presence of a well-differentiated lineage of Sylvaemus including samples of various species (A. sylvaticus, A. fulvipectus, A. ponticus) from distant locations, which were revealed to be nuclear copies of the mitochondrial cyt-b. The presence of this cryptic pseudogene in published sequences is supported by different pathways. This has led to important errors in previous molecular trees and hence to partial misinterpretations in the phylogeny of Apodemus. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFalse positive PTH results: An easy strategy to test and detect analytical interferences in routine practice
Cavalier, Etienne ULg; Carlisi, Agnès; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Clinica Chimica Acta (2008), 387(1-2), 150-152

Background: As other immunoassays, PTH determination is not free from interferences. Indeed, natural antibodies like heterophile antibodies (HAMA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) can induce falsely elevated ... [more ▼]

Background: As other immunoassays, PTH determination is not free from interferences. Indeed, natural antibodies like heterophile antibodies (HAMA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) can induce falsely elevated results, leading to misdiagnosis and expensive unnecessary explorations. However, in routine practice, these interferences are not always obvious to detect. Methods: On 2084 PTH samples, we applied a validation strategy in four steps to screen for HAMA and rheumatoid factor interferences. Results: 36% of our samples presented an elevated PTH. We found a clinically plausible reason for 91% of them. The remaining 63 suspicious samples were treated with HBT and 40% of them were found to be HAMA positive. RF determination was performed on the HAMA-negative samples and RE was positive in 21 of them. They were then treated with RF-Absorbent. Nine of these 21 samples presented RE interference. Conclusion: Applying this strategy in our routine validation, we managed to avoid spuriously elevated PTH results, which could have caused medical errors as well as unnecessary cost-effective extra-investigations. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFalsification des médicaments en Afrique : état de la question
Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg; Hubert, Philippe ULg

Scientific conference (2014, November 12)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLA FALSIFICATION DES MEDICAMENTS
Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg

in Forum Pharmaceutique (2012, March 16), -(-), 16

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFalsification des médicaments: mythe ou réalité ?
Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg; Fillet, Marianne ULg; Vancauwenberghe, Roy et al

Conference (2013, April 24)

La santé publique est de nos jours minée par la problématique des médicaments falsifiés ou de qualité inférieure, avec plusieurs conséquences sanitaires, économiques voire professionnelles. On estime à 7 ... [more ▼]

La santé publique est de nos jours minée par la problématique des médicaments falsifiés ou de qualité inférieure, avec plusieurs conséquences sanitaires, économiques voire professionnelles. On estime à 7% la part du marché pharmaceutique mondial que représenterait ce fléau; l’Afrique, l’Asie et de nombreux pays d'Amérique latine étant les régions les plus touchées avec plus de 30% de médicaments falsifiés. D’après l'OMS, plus de 50% des médicaments achetés à partir des sites internet illégaux sont contrefaits, annihilant très fortement les chances de succès thérapeutique. Ces médicaments viennent dans la plupart des cas des pays asiatiques et de l’Eurasie. Le trafic de faux médicaments est un crime contre l'humanité qui représente environ 50 milliards de dollars par an (10-15 % de plus que le marché de la drogue). Au travers de deux leçons, la situation de la falsification des médicaments sera présentée au grand public dans le but de le sensibiliser à ce fléau. La première leçon présentera la situation en Europe avec un accent sur la Belgique. La problématique du droit à la propriété intellectuelle et de l’encadrement législatif sera abordée, ainsi que la falsification des médicaments modernes et des phytomédicaments, ces derniers étant utilisés par plus de 40% de la population en Europe et aux Etats-Unis. Dans la seconde leçon sera abordée la situation vécue en Afrique. L’approvisionnement en médicaments de qualité par le partage de l’information sera présenté ainsi que les moyens analytiques à la disposition de ce continent pour combattre ce fléau. Des membres du Département de Pharmacie de l’Université de Liège, de l’Agence Fédérale des Médicaments et des Produits de Santé ainsi que du programme QUAMED (Quality Medicines for All) feront partager leur expérience sur cette question d’une brûlante actualité.  [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFalsos positivos de C5-carnitina elevada en cribado neonatal: A que son debidos?
Yahyaoui, Raquel; Rueda; Dayaldasani, Anita et al

in Medicina Clinica (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULg)
See detailFalstaff
Delville, Michel ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFAM-MDR: A Flexible Family-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction Technique to Detect Epistasis Using Related Individuals
Cattaert, Tom ULg; Urrea, V.; Naj, A. C. et al

in PLoS ONE (2010), 5(4), -

We propose a novel multifactor dimensionality reduction method for epistasis detection in small or extended pedigrees, FAM-MDR. It combines features of the Genome-wide Rapid Association using Mixed Model ... [more ▼]

We propose a novel multifactor dimensionality reduction method for epistasis detection in small or extended pedigrees, FAM-MDR. It combines features of the Genome-wide Rapid Association using Mixed Model And Regression approach (GRAMMAR) with Model-Based MDR (MB-MDR). We focus on continuous traits, although the method is general and can be used for outcomes of any type, including binary and censored traits. When comparing FAM-MDR with Pedigree-based Generalized MDR (PGMDR), which is a generalization of Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) to continuous traits and related individuals, FAM-MDR was found to outperform PGMDR in terms of power, in most of the considered simulated scenarios. Additional simulations revealed that PGMDR does not appropriately deal with multiple testing and consequently gives rise to overly optimistic results. FAM-MDR adequately deals with multiple testing in epistasis screens and is in contrast rather conservative, by construction. Furthermore, simulations show that correcting for lower order (main) effects is of utmost importance when claiming epistasis. As Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a complex phenotype likely influenced by gene-gene interactions, we applied FAM-MDR to examine data on glucose area-under-the-curve (GAUC), an endophenotype of T2DM for which multiple independent genetic associations have been observed, in the Amish Family Diabetes Study (AFDS). This application reveals that FAM-MDR makes more efficient use of the available data than PGMDR and can deal with multi-generational pedigrees more easily. In conclusion, we have validated FAM-MDR and compared it to PGMDR, the current state-of-the-art MDR method for family data, using both simulations and a practical dataset. FAM-MDR is found to outperform PGMDR in that it handles the multiple testing issue more correctly, has increased power, and efficiently uses all available information. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (23 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFAM-MDR: a flexible method of multifactor dimensionality reduction for high-order interaction detection
Van Steen, Kristel ULg; Calle, M.; Urrea, V. et al

in Conference Abstract book (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFamennian
Thorez, J; Dreesen, R; Streel, Maurice ULg

in Geologica Belgica (2006), 9(1/2), 27-45

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFamennian charcoal of Belgium.
Prestianni, Cyrille ULg; Decombeix, Anne-laure; Thorez, Jacques ULg et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (3 ULg)
See detailLe Famennien supérieur et les couches de transition Dévonien-Carbonifère dans la vallée de l'Ourthe (sud de Liege, Synclinorium de Dinant)
Bouckaert, J; Streel, Maurice ULg; Thorez, J

in Colloque sur la Stratigraphie du Carbonifère, (1971)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFamilial abdominal aortic aneurysms: collection of 233 multiplex families.
Kuivaniemi, Helena; Shibamura, Hidenori; Arthur, Claudette et al

in Journal of Vascular Surgery (2003), 37(2), 340-5

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated a large number of families in which at least two individuals were diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysms to identify the relationship of the affected relatives to the ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated a large number of families in which at least two individuals were diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysms to identify the relationship of the affected relatives to the proband. Subjects and Methods: Families for the study were recruited through various vascular surgery centers in the United States, Finland, Belgium, Canada, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom and through our patient recruitment website (www.genetics.wayne.edu/ags). RESULTS: We identified 233 families with at least two individuals diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The families originated from nine different nationalities, but all were white. There were 653 aneurysm patients in these families, with an average of 2.8 cases per family. Most of the families were small, with only two affected individuals. There were, however, six families with six, three with seven, and one with eight affected individuals. Most of the probands (82%) and the affected relatives (77%) were male, and the most common relationship to the proband was brother. Most of the families (72%) appeared to show autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, whereas in 58 families (25%), abdominal aortic aneurysms were inherited in autosomal dominant manner, and in eight families, the familial aggregation could be explained by autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. In the 66 families where abdominal aortic aneurysms were inherited in a dominant manner, 141 transmissions of the disease from one generation to another were identified, and the male-to-male, male-to-female, female-to-male, and female-to-female transmissions occurred in 46%, 11%, 32%, and 11%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our study supports previous studies about familial aggregation of abdominal aortic aneurysms and suggests that first-degree family members, male relatives, in particular, are at increased risk. No single inheritance mode could explain the occurrence of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the 233 families studied here, suggesting that abdominal aortic aneursyms are a multifactorial disorder with multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (5 ULg)
See detailFamilial Acromegaly : Case report and review of the litterature
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg; Teh, B. T. et al

in The 6th International Pituitary Congress - Abstract book (1999)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
See detailFamilial Acromegaly : Family screening and assetment in the familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA)
Fajardo, C.; Camara, R.; Daly, Adrian ULg et al

in 10th European Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFamilial Acromegaly: Case Report and Review of the Literature
Verloes, Alain ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg; Teh, B. T. et al

in Pituitary (1999), 1(3-4), 273-277

Familial acromegaly is an exceptional clinical entity when not associated with features of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). We report here 3 pedigrees in each of which 2 patients have been ... [more ▼]

Familial acromegaly is an exceptional clinical entity when not associated with features of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). We report here 3 pedigrees in each of which 2 patients have been shown to develop acromegaly. In 4 patients, clinical follow-up, and biological screening allowed to confidently exclude MEN1. Absence of mutation in the MEN1 gene after direct DNA analysis in 2 pedigrees reinforces the conviction that the families do not have MEN1. In families 1 and 2, diagnosis was made at a very early age and voluminous adenomas with suprasellar expansion were already present at the time of diagnosis. We review the 20 previous reports of familial acromegaly, some of them questionable. Our 3 families, combined with some other published pedigrees, allow the delineation of a familial form of acromegaly, distinct from MEN1. Dominant inheritance with reduced, age-dependant penetrance is the most parsimonious model to explain the recurrences. Gs protein pathway could be the site of action of the gene responsible of familial acromegaly, but no data have been published to sustain or reject this hypothesis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFamilial adenomatous polyposis: clinical presentation, detection and surveillance.
Laurent, S.; Franchimont, D.; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2011), 74(3), 415-20

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer related death in the western countries. It remains an important health problem, often under-diagnosed. The symptoms can appear very late and about 25 ... [more ▼]

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer related death in the western countries. It remains an important health problem, often under-diagnosed. The symptoms can appear very late and about 25% of the patients are diagnosed at metastatic stage. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited colorectal cancer syndrome, characterized by the early onset of hundred to thousands of adenomatous polyps in the colon and rectum. Left untreated, there is a nearly 100% cumulative risk of progression to CRC by the age of 35-40 years, as well as an increased risk of various other malignancies. CRC can be prevented by the identification of the high risk population and by the timely implementation of rigid screening programs which will lead to special medico-surgical interventions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 159 (4 ULg)