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See detailEmotional Response to Body and Facial Feedback in Alcohol-Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; Duchateau, Régis; El Hawa, Maya et al

in Alcoologie et Addictologie (2013), 35(2), 117-125

Introduction: The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body postures and facial expressions manipulation on subjective feelings in male alcohol dependent (ADs) divided into two ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body postures and facial expressions manipulation on subjective feelings in male alcohol dependent (ADs) divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology in order to gain some understanding of their difficulties in the regulation of emotions and in interpersonal relationships. Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants adopted facial expressions and body postures according to specific instructions and maintained these positions for 10 seconds. Expressions and postures entailed anger, sadness, and happiness as well as a neutral (baseline) condition. After each expression/posture manipulation, participants evaluated their subjective emotional state (including cheerfulness, sadness, and irritation). Results: The three groups reported heightened subjective feelings in concordance with the facial and posture manipulation with no difference emerging between AD and control participants, F(1, 60) = 0.01, p = .91, or between the three groups, F(2, 59) = 1.03, p = .36. Conclusions: Similarly to control participants, ADs from the two subtypes may be responsive to the combined effect of facial and body feedback and could, subsequently, benefit from its regulative effects. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Emotional Side of Paternalism: Do People Share What They Feel?
Silvestre, Aude ULg; Dardenne, Benoît ULg

Poster (2012, January 28)

We were interested in the kind of emotions felt and socially shared after experiencing paternalism (when A acts toward B with a fatherlike attitude) or blatant hostility. Participants had to read either a ... [more ▼]

We were interested in the kind of emotions felt and socially shared after experiencing paternalism (when A acts toward B with a fatherlike attitude) or blatant hostility. Participants had to read either a paternalist, hostile or factual version of the welcome speech of their new boss. They then were asked to write a text about how this day was going (social sharing measure). The results revealed that being the target of paternalism or hostility is an emotional episode which leads to social sharing of emotion. Hostility is a clearly negative episode, leading to negative social sharing. Paternalism is more ambiguous. Participants felt positive emotions (except for distrust) but they shared both positive and negative ones. Paternalism can be perceived as positive but seems to lead to negative outcomes. Our further step would be to test its negative effects on performance (reading span test). [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional valence influences the rates of false memories
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Van der Linden, Martial; Laroi, Frank ULg

Poster (2006, July)

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See detailEmotions and cognitions. The evolution of the theory of emotions in the first Husserl
Gyemant, Maria ULg

Conference (2013, June 12)

In the Fifth Logical Investigation, after a series of objections to Brentano’s thesis that presentations constitute the most basic type of mental acts, Husserl offers the alternative of a fundamental ... [more ▼]

In the Fifth Logical Investigation, after a series of objections to Brentano’s thesis that presentations constitute the most basic type of mental acts, Husserl offers the alternative of a fundamental distinction between objectifying and non-objectifying mental acts. Objectifying acts include the first two Brentanian classes: presentations and judgments. Thus the class of emotions is singled out as the typical model for non-objectifying acts. However, Husserl changes his mind on this issue later on. We find a new and rather surprising theory of emotions in his Ideas I of 1913. In the §117 for instance, Husserl states clearly that all acts, emotions included, are objectifying because they all constitute objects. The only difference between emotions and cognitions is that emotions constitute values as their objects. Since all acts are objectifying, the difference is now between kinds of objects rather than kinds of acts. It seems though that the role values play in our mental life is more complicated. Not only are they dependent objects constructed from objects of simple presentations or judgments, but they are also the sort of objects that can motivate other acts. So, while emotions are in Husserl always dependent on cognitions, since wanting something necessarily supposes, as in Brentano, a previous presentation of that thing, certain emotions can also play a foundational role for cognitions. Hence the question addressed in this paper: is the relation between emotions and cognitions a symmetrical one since both can play the role of foundational act for the other? And if this is the case what is the specificity of emotions as mental acts and how can they be distinguished from cognitions? [less ▲]

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See detailEmotions et rationalité en philosophie morale : Heidegger?
Pieron, Julien ULg

Scientific conference (2007, April 19)

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See detailEmotions, Stress and their regulations. Application for the business and professional surrounding
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2013, February 28)

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See detailEmousser le regard, éprouver le propre de l'art. Considérations muséologiques
Hagelstein, Maud ULg

Article for general public (2014)

À Paris, l’été n’aura pas laissé en reste les amateurs d’expositions non conventionnelles. L’inventivité de certains commissaires – au sens large de la fonction, qui englobe l’artiste comme le ... [more ▼]

À Paris, l’été n’aura pas laissé en reste les amateurs d’expositions non conventionnelles. L’inventivité de certains commissaires – au sens large de la fonction, qui englobe l’artiste comme le collectionneur – semblait d’ailleurs forcer le spectateur à ré-envisager ses attentes. Que cherche-t-on lorsque l’on visite un lieu culturel ? Quels savoirs sont mobilisés, quels autres affectés par la rencontre ? Quelles impressions s’impriment durablement ? Ce type de questionnement est généralement laissé à la recherche en muséologie, qui a pour vocation méta-disciplinaire de réfléchir aux conditions d’exposition observées dans le champ muséal. Mais il arrive que le spectateur se sente lui-même partie prenante du processus critique et qu’il soit directement invité à interroger de l’intérieur les modalités de sa rencontre avec l’art. [less ▲]

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See detailL'empathie et la perception des formes dans l'éthologie contemporaine
Servais, Véronique ULg

in Berthoz, Alain; Jorland, Gerard (Eds.) L'empathie (2004)

The paper states that purely objective descriptions of animal behaviour is impossible. The behavioursit approach of animal behaviour, because it denies an amotional life to the animals, reinfoce ... [more ▼]

The paper states that purely objective descriptions of animal behaviour is impossible. The behavioursit approach of animal behaviour, because it denies an amotional life to the animals, reinfoce anthropomorphism instead of suppressing it. Empathy is seen as a less anthropomorphic stance. [less ▲]

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See detailEmpathie et Trouble Oppositionnel chez l'enfant de 8 à 12 ans
Dahmen, Caroline; Malpas, Anne; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg et al

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2004), IX(1), 3-11

A literature review underlines strong links between facial expression recognition difficulty, lack of empathy and behaviour disorder. The main goal of this study was to assess if, as it is suggested in ... [more ▼]

A literature review underlines strong links between facial expression recognition difficulty, lack of empathy and behaviour disorder. The main goal of this study was to assess if, as it is suggested in the literature, oppositional children presented an empathy deficit that can make them more aggressive. Forty children between 8 and 10 years old (15 control children and 15 oppositional children) were subjected to the “Empathy Response Task” from Ricard et Kamberk-Kilicci (1995). As expected, results show that oppositional children are significantly less empathic that control children. Anger is often assigned to protagonists even when it isn’t present. This can be interpreted by the “hostile attribution distortion” according to wich the children with behaviour disorders tend to allocate hostile intentions to others (Milich & Dodge, 1984). Working on empathy must be integrated in behaviour disorder children therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailEmpathizing with the disembodied
Delville, Michel ULg; Norris, Andrew

Conference (2012, June 15)

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See detailEmpathy and social relationships in suicidal adolescents
Jadin, Aurore ULg; Vermaelen, Noémie; Blavier, Adelaïde ULg

Poster (2014, May 27)

Empathy and suicide among minor people are two research topics currently very explored. Psychologists often speak about suicide because it represents the second cause of mortality among 15-24-year-old ... [more ▼]

Empathy and suicide among minor people are two research topics currently very explored. Psychologists often speak about suicide because it represents the second cause of mortality among 15-24-year-old adolescents (Delvenne, 2005). Several studies have already analyzed the links between empathy skills and some psychopathology (behavioral disorders, hyperactivity and alcoholism) but no research before this one has developed empathic abilities in suicidal adolescents. The aims of the present study were respectively to examine suicidal adolescents’ empathy skills, interpersonal capacities and to investigate the quality of their social relationships. [less ▲]

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See detailEmpathy for pain and Alexithymia : a rTMS study
Lemaire, Morgan ULg

Poster (2012, December 12)

Empathy is a multi-facet function regulating social life. In this study, we investigated empathy in relation to alexithymia. Alexithymia is considered as a state showing difficulties in identification and ... [more ▼]

Empathy is a multi-facet function regulating social life. In this study, we investigated empathy in relation to alexithymia. Alexithymia is considered as a state showing difficulties in identification and distinction of one’s own emotional life, as well as difficulties in identification/distinction of others emotions. Thus, alexithymia is considered as an empathy trouble. Previous studies demonstrated that alexithymia is characterized by a particular pattern of cerebral activation comprising some important zones of emotional control (i.e., left DLPFC hyperactivation, left ACC hypoactivation). In the present study, we investigated the electrodermal response of participants during an empathy for pain task before and after an inhibiting rTMS on the right DLPFC to facilitate the ACC activation, with the aim to enhance the emotional expression for alexithymic population. Results showed that rTMS on the right DLPFC increase the relaxation of the alexithymic participants facing the stimuli. This can match our assumptions but further research is needed to clarify this situation. [less ▲]

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See detailEmpédocle, ou comment entrer en philosophie. Sartre et la pensée allemande dans les années 1920
Cormann, Grégory ULg

in Etudes Sartriennes (2016), 20

Comment Sartre est-il entré en philosophie ? Au-delà des petits récits légendaires, tels que ceux que Raymond Aron a laissés à propos de la découverte de la phénoménologie ou de la première formulation de ... [more ▼]

Comment Sartre est-il entré en philosophie ? Au-delà des petits récits légendaires, tels que ceux que Raymond Aron a laissés à propos de la découverte de la phénoménologie ou de la première formulation de la théorie de la contingence pendant les années passées à l’ENS, le présent article vise à établir les conditions dans lesquelles Sartre a formulé à son origine le projet de faire œuvre de philosophe. En pistant le réseau de curiosité intellectuelle pour la pensée allemande dont le titre du manuscrit Empédocle atteste, cet article reconstitue d’abord le milieu intellectuel dans lequel Sartre évolue au milieu des années 1920 avec ses camarades Aron et Nizan, autour des activités du Groupe d’Information Internationale de l’École Normale Supérieure. Comme les Carnets et Les Mots le confirment dans l’après-coup, ce milieu intellectuel fortement « alsacien » lui permet tout à la fois de prolonger et de compliquer – jusqu’à la rupture, peut-être – la vocation à la fois pédagogique et critique que charriait son inscription dans une histoire intellectuelle double, française et allemande. Dans cette étude de la « sociabilité alsacienne » du jeune Sartre et de son rapport avec les premières générations de la germanistique française, la figure de Robert Minder (1902-1980) sert de point de comparaison avec Sartre. La suite de l’article précise la nature du projet philosophique de Sartre dans le rapport qu’il entretient avec la vocation littéraire qui l’a attiré vers des études de philosophie. Dans cette partie, c’est la rencontre personnelle et théorique de Sartre avec Bernard Groethuysen (1880-1946) qui sert de guide. La trajectoire du philosophe allemand permet tout à la fois à Sartre d’articuler la littérature et la philosophie (dans un espace de circulation culturelle franco-allemand) et d’amorcer le passage de l’exigence nietzschéenne d’un recommencement de la philosophie (qui vaut aussi pour l’après-Première Guerre mondiale) avec le programme d’une philosophie rigoureuse déjà incarné chez Groethuysen par la phénoménologie de Husserl. En conclusion, l’article revient sur la façon dont Sartre récupère la situation particulière dans laquelle il rédige son Empédocle – son histoire amoureuse avec Simone Jollivet – en direction d’une philosophie qui expose non seulement le philosophe à une enquête permanente sur soi (Victor Hugo prenant alors le relais de Nietzsche), mais qui soit aussi une entreprise philosophique nouvelle qui conteste de l’intérieur, en la poussant dans ses conséquences extrêmes, la généalogie héroïque – et masculiniste – dont elle est issue. En somme, il s’agit ici, par le truchement d’une lecture symbolique d’un texte de jeunesse, de considérer la philosophie sartrienne au point où elle se précède elle-même, avant la découverte de Heidegger et avant la rencontre de Simone de Beauvoir. Dans cette reconstruction des conditions de possibilité de la philosophie de Sartre – et de Beauvoir – se poursuit dès lors l’entreprise, encore très partiellement réalisée, de faire l’archéologie de la philosophie française contemporaine (selon l’expression d’Alain Badiou) dans l’entre-deux-guerres, à savoir de déterminer la portée critique et historiographique de la phénoménologie existentialiste. [less ▲]

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See detailLes empereurs julio-claudiens et les lettres grecques
Rochette, Bruno ULg

Conference (2013, April)

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See detailLes empereurs romains et la défense de l'imperium sur le Rhin
Dignef, Anthony ULg

in Congrès de Namur organisé par la Société Archéologique de Namur en collaboration avec les Facultés universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix à Namur, 28-31 août 2008. Actes (2011)

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See detailEmpereurs, rois et conquérants antiques au Moyen Âge. Retour sur quelques publications récentes
Dumont, Jonathan ULg

in Moyen Age (Le) (2013), 119(2), 449-455

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULg)