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See detailFermat
Bouquiaux, Laurence ULg

in Encyclopédie philosophique universelle. III Les oeuvre philosophiques (1992)

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See detailFerme Delsamme : action entre utopie et réalité
Muramatsu, Kenjiro ULg

Report (2009)

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See detailFermentable Carbohydrates and dietary protein level differently shape the bacterial community structure in the proximal colon of pigs
Boudry, Christelle ULg; Pieper, Robert; Vahjen, Wilfried et al

in International workshop on nutrition and intestinal microbiota host interaction in the pig : Book of abstracts (2013, October 24)

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See detailFermentable Fiber Ameliorates Fermentable Protein-Induced Changes in Microbial Ecology, but not the Mucosal Response, in the Colon of Piglets
Pieper, Robert; Kröger, Susan; Richter, Jan F. et al

in Journal of Nutrition (2012), 142

Dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) is reported to reduce large intestinal formation of putatively toxic metabolites derived from fermentable proteins (fCP). However, the influence of ... [more ▼]

Dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) is reported to reduce large intestinal formation of putatively toxic metabolites derived from fermentable proteins (fCP). However, the influence of diets high in fCP concentration on epithelial response and interaction with fCHO is still unclear. Thirty-two weaned piglets were fed 4 diets in a 2 3 2 factorial design with low fCP/low fCHO [14.5% crude protein (CP)/14.5% total dietary fiber (TDF)]; low fCP/high fCHO (14.8% CP/ 16.6% TDF); high fCP low fCHO (19.8% CP/14.5% TDF); and high fCP/high fCHO (20.1% CP/18.0% TDF) as dietary treatments. After 21–23 d, pigs were killed and colon digesta and tissue samples analyzed for indices of microbial ecology, tissue expression of genes for cell turnover, cytokines, mucus genes (MUC), and oxidative stress indices. Pig performance was unaffected by diet. fCP increased (P , 0.05) cell counts of clostridia in the Clostridium leptum group and total short and branched chain fatty acids, ammonia, putrescine, histamine, and spermidine concentrations, whereas high fCHO increased (P , 0.05) cell counts of clostridia in the C. leptum and C. coccoides groups, shifted the acetate to propionate ratio toward acetate (P , 0.05), and reduced ammonia and putrescine (P , 0.05). High dietary fCP increased (P , 0.05) expression of PCNA, IL1b, IL10, TGFb, MUC1, MUC2, and MUC20, irrespective of fCHO concentration. The ratio of glutathione:glutathione disulfide was reduced (P , 0.05) by fCP and the expression of glutathione transferase was reduced by fCHO (P , 0.05). In conclusion, fermentable fiber ameliorates fermentable protein-induced changes in most measures of luminal microbial ecology but not the mucosal response in the large intestine of pigs. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentable non-starch polysaccharides increase the excretion of bacterial proteins in the pig's faeces and reduce urinary N excretion.
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Leterme, Pascal; Wavreille, José et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2008), 86(suppl. 3), 101

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See detailFermentaciones ruminales en ovinos alimentados con pasto solo o complementado.
Rodriguez, F.; Thewis, André ULg; Francois, E. et al

Scientific conference (1988, December)

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See detailFermentation contrôlée des olives vertes de table.
Lamzira, Z.; Ghabour, N.; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2007, June 07)

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See detailFermentation of date palm juice by curdlan gum production from Rhizobium radiobacter ATCC 6466 (TM): Purification, rheological and physico-chemical characterization
Ben Salah, Riadh; Jaouadi, Bassem; Bouaziz, Amin et al

in Lwt-Food Science And Technology (2011), 44(4), 1026-1034

The present study was undertaken to investigate the possibility of using date palm juice byproducts for curdlan production by Rhizobium radiobacter ATCC 6466(TM) in batch experiments. A number of ... [more ▼]

The present study was undertaken to investigate the possibility of using date palm juice byproducts for curdlan production by Rhizobium radiobacter ATCC 6466(TM) in batch experiments. A number of operational parameters, namely pH value, temperature range, inoculum ratio, agitation speed, carbon concentration, nitrogen source, and fermentation time, were investigated in terms of their optimal values for as well as individual and synergistic effects on curdlan production. The findings indicated that the strain exhibited a high ability to use the natural substrate under investigation. A curdlan production yield of 22.83 g/l was obtained in 500-ml agitated flasks (50 ml) when the strain was cultivated in the optimal medium (pH, 7; ammonium sulphate concentration, 2 g/l; date glucose juice concentration, 120 g/l) operating at 30 degrees C with an inoculum ratio of 5 ml/100 ml, an agitation speed of 180 rpm, and a fermentation period of 51 h. The purified date byproducts-curdlan (DBP-curdlan) had a molecular weight of 180 kDa, a linear structure composed exclusively of beta-(1,3)-glucosidic linkages, a melting temperature (T(m)) and glass transition temperature (T(g)) of 1.24 and -3.55 degrees C. respectively. The average measured heights of its molecules were noted to fluctuate between 14.1 +/- 0.07 and 211.73 +/- 0.6 mu m. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentation of Kivuguto, a Rwandese traditional milk : selection of microbes for a starter culture
Karenzi, E.; Dubois-Dauphin, R.; Mashaku, A. et al

in Sciences & technologie C (2012), 36

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See detailFermentation of non-starch polysaccharides in the pig intestines.
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2007)

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See detailFermentative biohydrogen production in a novel biodisc bioreactor: Principle and Improvement
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Masset, Julien ULg et al

in Bozhou, Li (Ed.) Low Carbon Earth Summit 2011 Proceeding (2011, October 23)

In order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates, the biotechnological process needs to be further optimized and efficient bioreactors must be designed. A biodisc bioreactor has been ... [more ▼]

In order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates, the biotechnological process needs to be further optimized and efficient bioreactors must be designed. A biodisc bioreactor has been design and investigated to produce biohydrogen from glucose by the Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009 strain at a high yield and production rate. This reactor, working continuously, has an internal volume of 2.3l but a working volume (liquid phase) of 300ml. Firstly, it enhances the hydrogen production rate (by about 3 times more than a completely stirred bioreactor) by partially fixing the bacteria on the porous support and thus increasing the cell concentration in the bioreactor (decoupling of HRT and SRT). Secondly, the rotating biodisc design enables efficient gas transfer (hydrogen and carbon dioxyde) from the liquid phase where it is produced by the bacteria to the headspace. Indeed, this is an important way to increase hydrogen production yields (by about 25% compared to a completely stirred bioreactor) by allowing the bacteria to focus on the metabolites pathways that produce more hydrogen. Other reactors designs have shown such good results by increasing the interfacial surface. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentative hydrogen production by Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009 and Citrobacter freundii CWBI952 in pure and mixed cultures
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Hamilton, Christopher ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2010), 14(S2), 541-548

This paper investigates the biohydrogen production by two mesophilic strains, a strict anaerobe (Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009) and a facultative anaerobe (Citrobacter freundii CWBI952). They were ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the biohydrogen production by two mesophilic strains, a strict anaerobe (Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009) and a facultative anaerobe (Citrobacter freundii CWBI952). They were cultured in pure and mixed cultures in serum bottles with five different carbon sources. The hydrogen yields of pure C. freundii cultures ranged from 0.09 molH2.molhexose-1 (with sucrose) to 0.24 molH2.molhexose-1 (with glucose). Higher yields were obtained by the pure cultures of Cl. butyricum ranging from 0.44 molH2.molhexose-1 (with sucrose) to 0.69 molH2.molhexose-1 (with lactose). This strain also fermented starch whereas C. freundii did not. However, it consumed the other substrates faster and produced hydrogen earlier than Cl. butyricum. This ability has been used to promote the growth conditions of Cl. butyricum in co-culture with C. freundii, since Cl. butyricum is extremely sensitive to the presence of oxygen which strongly inhibits H2 production. This approach could avoid the addition of any expensive reducing agents in the culture media such as L-cysteine since C. freundii consumes the residual oxygen. Thereafter, co-cultures with glucose and starch were investigated: hydrogen yields decreased from 0.53 molH2.molhexose-1 for pure Cl. butyricum cultures to 0.38 molH2.molhexose -1 for mixed culture with glucose but slightly increased with starch (respectively 0.69 and 0.73 molH2.molhexose-1). After 48 h of fermentation, metabolites analysis confirmed with microbial observation, revealed that the cell concentration of C. freundii dramatically decreased or was strongly inhibited by the development of Cl. butyricum. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentative hydrogen production from glucose and starch using pure strains and artificial co-cultures ofClostridium spp.
Masset, Julien; Calusinska, Magdalena ULg; Hamilton, Christopher et al

in Biotechnology for biofuels (2012), 5(1), 35

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pure bacterial strains give better yields when producing H2 than mixed, natural communities. However the main drawback with the pure cultures is the need to perform the fermentations ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pure bacterial strains give better yields when producing H2 than mixed, natural communities. However the main drawback with the pure cultures is the need to perform the fermentations under sterile conditions. Therefore, H2 production using artificial co-cultures, composed of well characterized strains, is one of the directions currently undertaken in the field of biohydrogen research. RESULTS: Four pure Clostridium cultures, including C. butyricum CWBI1009, C. pasteurianum DSM525, C. beijerinckii DSM1820 and C. felsineum DSM749, and three different co-cultures composed of (1) C. pasteurianum and C. felsineum, (2) C. butyricum and C. felsineum, (3) C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum, were grown in 20 L batch bioreactors. In the first part of the study a strategy composed of three-culture sequences was developed to determine the optimal pH for H2 production (sequence 1); and the H2-producing potential of each pure strain and co-culture, during glucose (sequence 2) and starch (sequence 3) fermentations at the optimal pH. The best H2 yields were obtained for starch fermentations, and the highest yield of 2.91 mol H2/ mol hexose was reported for C. butyricum. By contrast, the biogas production rates were higher for glucose fermentations and the highest value of 1.5 L biogas/ h was observed for the co-culture (1). In general co-cultures produced H2 at higher rates than the pure Clostridium cultures, without negatively affecting the H2 yields. Interestingly, all the Clostridium strains and co-cultures were shown to utilize lactate (present in a starch-containing medium), and C. beijerinckii was able to re-consume formate producing additional H2. In the second part of the study the co-culture (3) was used to produce H2 during 13 days of glucose fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). In addition, the species dynamics, as monitored by qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR), showed a stable coexistence of C. pasteurianum and C. butyricum during this fermentation. CONCLUSIONS: The four pure Clostridium strains and the artificial co-cultures tested in this study were shown to efficiently produce H2 using glucose and starch as carbon sources. The artificial co-cultures produced H2 at higher rates than the pure strains, while the H2 yields were only slightly affected. [less ▲]

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See detailFermi motion and quark off-shellness in elastic vector- meson production
Royen, Isabelle; Cudell, Jean-René ULg

in Nuclear Physics B (1999), B545

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See detailFernand De Visscher als Archäologe - die Elefanten aus Alba Fucens
Gerkens, Jean-François ULg

Scientific conference (2013, March 27)

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