Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
See detailEvaluation of Macrolophus pygmaeus as biocontrol agent aginst aphids
De Backer, Lara ULg

Master's dissertation (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Serine Proteases Activities in Three B16 Melanoma Cell Lines with Distinct Tumorigenic Potential
Baramova, E. N.; Coucke, P.; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Anticancer Research (1994), 14(3A, May-Jun), 841-6

Mouse B16 melanoma cells (B16, parental line) and two derived clones either pigmented (B16P) or non pigmented (B16NP) were cultured as monolayers (2D) or on agar, as aggregates (3D). The productions of ... [more ▼]

Mouse B16 melanoma cells (B16, parental line) and two derived clones either pigmented (B16P) or non pigmented (B16NP) were cultured as monolayers (2D) or on agar, as aggregates (3D). The productions of gelatinases A and B (72 kDa and 92 kDa type IV collagenases) and their inhibitors (TIMP1 and TIMP2), plasminogen activators (PAs) and plasminogen activator inhibitors (PAI) were investigated. The B16 cell lines did not secrete any gelatinase, but they secreted TIMP2, tissue-type (t-PA), urokinase-type (u-PA) plasminogen activators and PAI-1 like activities. High levels of PAI activity were determined in conditioned media and cellular extracts of B16NP, which could account for the lower tumorigenic potential of these cells. In 3D cultures, the cellular extracts of the three cell lines contained essentially u-PA activity. This activity could contribute to the greater tumorigenic and invasive capacities of B16, B16P and B16NP when cultured in 3D. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for second-generation lignin analysis
Richel, Aurore ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Simon, Mathilde ULg et al

in Analytical Chemistry Insights (2012), 7

Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is evaluated as an elucidation tool for structural features and molecular weights estimation of some extracted ... [more ▼]

Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is evaluated as an elucidation tool for structural features and molecular weights estimation of some extracted herbaceous lignins. Optimization of analysis conditions, using a typical organic matrix, namely CHCA (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid), in combination with alpha-cyclodextrine, allows efficient ionization of poorly soluble lignin materials and suppression of matrix-related ions background. Analysis of low-mass fragments ions (m/z 100-600) in the positive ion mode offers a “fingerprint” of starting lignins that could be a fine strategy to qualitatively identify principal interunit linkages between phenylpropanoid units. The molecular weights of lignins are estimated using size exclusion chromatography and compared to MALDI-TOF-MS profiles. Miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus) and Switchgrass (Panicum Virgatum L.) lignins, recovered after a formic acid/acetic acid/water process or aqueous ammonia soaking, are selected as benchmarks for this study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of medicinal plants from Reunion Island for antimalarial and cytotoxic activities
Jonville, Marie ULg; Kodja, H.; Humeau, L. et al

in Planta Medica (2008), 74(9), 1002-1002

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of network equivalents for voltage optimization in multi-area power systems
Phulpin, Yannick; Miroslav, Begovic; Petit, Marc et al

in IEEE Transactions on Power Systems (2009), 24(2), 729-743

The paper addresses the problem of decentralized optimization for a power system partitioned into several areas controlled by different transmission system operators (TSOs). The optimization variables are ... [more ▼]

The paper addresses the problem of decentralized optimization for a power system partitioned into several areas controlled by different transmission system operators (TSOs). The optimization variables are the settings for taps, generators’ voltages and compensators’, and the objective function is either based on the minimization of reactive power support, the minimization of active power losses, or a combination of both criteria. We suppose that each TSO assumes an external network equivalent for its neighboring areas and optimizes without concern for the neighboring systems’ objectives its own optimization function. We study, in the context where every TSO adopts the same type of objective function, the performance of an iterative scheme, where every TSO refreshes at each iteration the parameters of its external network equivalents depending on its past internal observations, solves its local optimization problem, and then, applies its “optimal actions” to the power system. In the context of voltage optimization, we find out that this decentralized control scheme can converge to nearly optimal global performance for relatively simple equivalents and simple procedures for fitting their parameters. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEVALUATION OF NOVEL SYNTHETIC POLYCATION ACTION ON VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE
Riquelme, B; Foresto, P; Relancio, F et al

in Annales AFA (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of ocean carbon cycle models with data-based metrics
Matsumoto, K.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Key, R. M. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2004), 31(7),

New radiocarbon and chlorofluorocarbon-11 data from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment are used to assess a suite of 19 ocean carbon cycle models. We use the distributions and inventories of these ... [more ▼]

New radiocarbon and chlorofluorocarbon-11 data from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment are used to assess a suite of 19 ocean carbon cycle models. We use the distributions and inventories of these tracers as quantitative metrics of model skill and find that only about a quarter of the suite is consistent with the new data-based metrics. This should serve as a warning bell to the larger community that not all is well with current generation of ocean carbon cycle models. At the same time, this highlights the danger in simply using the available models to represent the state-of-the-art modeling without considering the credibility of each model. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of ocean model ventilation with CFC-11: comparison of 13 global ocean models
Dutay, J.-C.; Bullister, J. L.; Doney, S. C. et al

in Ocean Modelling (2002), 4(2), 89-120

We compared the 13 models participating in the Ocean Carbon Model Intercomparison Project (OCMIP) with regards to their skill in matching observed distributions of CFC-11. This analysis characterizes the ... [more ▼]

We compared the 13 models participating in the Ocean Carbon Model Intercomparison Project (OCMIP) with regards to their skill in matching observed distributions of CFC-11. This analysis characterizes the abilities of these models to ventilate the ocean on timescales relevant for anthropogenic CO2 uptake. We found a large range in the modeled global inventory (+/- 30\%), mainly due to differences in ventilation from the high latitudes. In the Southern Ocean, models differ particularly in the longitudinal distribution of the CFC uptake in the intermediate water, whereas the latitudinal distribution is mainly controlled by the subgrid-scale parameterization. Models with isopycnal diffusion and eddy-induced velocity parameterization produce more realistic intermediate water ventilation. Deep and bottom water ventilation also varies substantially between the models. Models coupled to a sea-ice model systematically provide more realistic AABW formation source region; however these same models also largely overestimate AABW ventilation if no specific parameterization of brine rejection during sea-ice formation is included. In the North Pacific Ocean, all models exhibit a systematic large underestimation of the CFC uptake in the thermocline of the subtropical gyre, while no systematic difference toward the observations is found in the subpolar gyre. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the CFC uptake is globally underestimated in subsurface. In the deep ocean, all but the adjoint model, failed to produce the two recently ventilated branches observed in the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Furthermore, simulated transport in the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) is too sluggish in all but the isopycnal model, where it is too rapid. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of OCMIP-2 ocean models' deep circulation with mantle helium-3
Dutay, J. C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Campin, J. M. et al

in Journal of Marine Systems (2004), 48(1-4), 15-36

We compare simulations of the injection of mantle helium-3 into the deep ocean from six global coarse resolution models which participated in the Ocean Carbon Model Intercomparison Project (OCMIP). We ... [more ▼]

We compare simulations of the injection of mantle helium-3 into the deep ocean from six global coarse resolution models which participated in the Ocean Carbon Model Intercomparison Project (OCMIP). We also discuss the results of a study carried out with one of the models, which examines the effect of the subgrid-scale mixing parameterization. These sensitivity tests provide useful information to interpret the differences among the OCMIP models and between model simulations and the data. We find that the OCMIP models, which parameterize subgrid-scale mixing using an eddy-induced velocity, tend to underestimate the ventilation of the deep ocean, based on diagnostics with delta(3)He. In these models, this parameterization is implemented with a constant thickness diffusivity coefficient. In future simulations, we recommend using such a parameterization with spatially and temporally varying coefficients in order to moderate its effect on stratification. The performance of the models with regard to the formation of AABW confirms the conclusion from a previous evaluation with CFC-11. Models coupled with a sea-ice model produce a substantial bottom water formation in the Southern Ocean that tends to overestimate AABW ventilation, while models that are not coupled with a sea-ice model systematically underestimate the formation of AABW We also analyze specific features of the deep He-3 distribution (He-3 plumes) that are particularly well depicted in the data and which put severe constraints on the deep circulation. We show that all the models fail to reproduce a correct propagation of these plumes in the deep ocean. The resolution of the models may be too coarse to reproduce the strong and narrow currents in the deep ocean., and the models do not incorporate the geothermal heating that may also contribute to the generation of these currents. We also use the context of OCMIP-2 to explore the potential of mantle helium-3 as a tool to compare and evaluate modeled deep-ocean circulations. Although the source function of mantle helium is known with a rather large uncertainty, we find that the parameterization used for the injection of mantle helium-3 is sufficient to generate realistic results, even in the Atlantic Ocean where a previous pioneering study [J. Geophys. Res. 100 (1995) 3829] claimed this parameterization generates inadequate results. These results are supported by a multi-tracer evaluation performed by considering the simulated distributions of both helium-3 and natural C-14, and comparing the simulated tracer fields with available data. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of odour impact from a landfill area and a waste treatment facility through the application of two atmospheric dispersion models.
Ubeda, Yolanda; Ferrer, M.; Sanchis, E. et al

Conference (2010, July)

Odour emission from landfill areas has a high potential to cause significant annoyance to people living in their surroundings. In order to avoid odour nuisance, it is crucial to select the best location ... [more ▼]

Odour emission from landfill areas has a high potential to cause significant annoyance to people living in their surroundings. In order to avoid odour nuisance, it is crucial to select the best location in the project phase of these facilities. In the present work, two different atmospheric dispersion models were employed to predict odour impact from a projected landfill area and a waste treatment facility. The first model used was a simplified Gaussian Atmospheric Dispersion model developed by the authors. Calculated odour concentrations were represented using GIS tools (Esri ®ArcMapTM software). Regarding to the second model, it was a commercial bi-Gaussian Atmospheric Dispersion one. The odour impact of the waste treatment facility is expected to be low, because of the high efficiency of air biofiltration treatments and the dispersion effect of the stack. The shape and the reach of odour percentile contours were quite similar, providing coherent results between two models. Concerning the landfill installation, odour concentrations were modelled for the prevailing winds. The results obtained with both models differ in the reach of odour. The maximum distance obtained by the simple dispersion model was 1.5 km, compared with the almost 5 km modelled by the commercial bi-Gaussian one. The reasons of this disparity could be caused by the difference in the dispersion coefficients employed in the two models and also an error related to ground level emission. In addition, the meteorological conditions in the Mediterranean typically present a high proportion of calm winds, which provided worse dispersion results and did not reflect the real odour dispersion. Odour emission rate seems to be overestimated, and this could explain the high distance reached by odour. Field measurements are required when landfill installation becomes operational, in order to determine the real impact of odour. Bi-Gaussian Dispersion Models may not be appropriate to quantify the odour impact from agricultural sources. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of oral corticosteroids and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor on the acute inflammation induced by inhaled lipopolysaccharide in human.
Michel, Olivier; Dentener, Mieke; Cataldo, Didier ULg et al

in Pulmonary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2007), 20(6), 676-83

Background Endotoxins are pro-inflammatory substances present in the environment. In man, inhalation of its purified derivative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces inflammation related to macrophages and ... [more ▼]

Background Endotoxins are pro-inflammatory substances present in the environment. In man, inhalation of its purified derivative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces inflammation related to macrophages and neutrophils. Corticosteroids and phosphodiesterase (PDE)-4 inhibitors have inhibiting effects on macrophages and neutrophils, respectively. This study investigated the effect of prednisolone and of the PDE-4 inhibitor cilomilast on the LPS-induced acute inflammation. Methods The study was a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover design. On three occasions, at 2 weeks interval, 16 healthy subjects inhaled 50 μg LPS after a 6-day treatment with cilomilast (15 mg bd), prednisolone (10 mg bd) or placebo. For the assessment of the inflammatory response, induced sputum was obtained before inclusion and 6 h post-LPS while blood samples were collected before, 6 and 24 h post-LPS. Results Inhaled LPS induced an increase in sputum neutrophils (p<0.0001), logMMP-9 (p<0.05), logMMP-9/TIMP-1 (p<0.01) and logTNF-α (p<0.02). At the blood level there were significant rise in neutrophilia (p<0.001), E-selectin (p<0.02), C-reactive protein (CRP) (p<0.001) and LPS-binding protein (p<0.001). There was both a slight, but not significant, increase in body temperature and decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). Neither prednisolone nor cilomilast had protective effect on the LPS-induced airways’ inflammation. The LPS-induced CRP acute-phase protein of inflammation (0.58±0.13 and 3.52±0.41 mg/dL, before and after LPS, respectively) was significantly inhibited by a pre-treatment with prednisolone (1.39±0.32 mg/dL, p<0.01) and attenuated (2.65±0.30 mg/dL, p=0.09) with cilomilast. Conclusion In healthy subjects, while the LPS-induced airways’ inflammation was not modified either by oral prednisolone or by PDE-4 inhibitor cilomilast (at actual dosage), the LPS-induced acute phase of blood inflammation was reduced by prednisolone. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of organic dust components cytotoxicity on thp1 monocytes-derived-macrophages using high content analysis
Ramery, Eve ULg; O'Brien, Peter James

in Veterinary Clinical Pathology (2011, December), 40(4), 583

Background: Organic dust contains pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) which can induce, following chronic exposure, significant airway diseases. Mononuclear phagocytes are key protecting cells ... [more ▼]

Background: Organic dust contains pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) which can induce, following chronic exposure, significant airway diseases. Mononuclear phagocytes are key protecting cells of the respiratory tract. Several studies have investigated the effects of PAMPs, and mainly endotoxins, on cytokine production. However the sub-lethal cytotoxicity of organic dust components on macrophages has not been tested yet. The novel technology of high content analysis (HCA) is already used to assess subclinical drug-induced toxicity. It combines the capabilities of flow cytometry, intracellular fluorescence probes, and image analysis and enables to perform rapid multiple analysis in large numbers of samples. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was, by using HCA, to investigate the cytotoxicity of the 3 major PAMPs contained in organic dust, ie. endotoxin (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and β-glucans (zymosan) on THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Methods: LPS was used at concentrations of 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 μg/ml; PGN and zymosan were used at concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 50, 100 and 500 μg/ml. Cells were exposed to PAMPs for 24 hours. In addition, the oxidative burst and the phagocytic capabilities of the cells were tested. Results: An overlap between PGN intrinsic fluorescence and red/far-red fluorescent dyes occurred, rendering the evaluation of some parameters impossible for PGN. LPS induced sub-lethal cytotoxicity at the lowest dose (from 10 ng/ml). However, the most spectacular changes occurred with zymosan. In addition, zymosan, but not LPS, induced phagosome maturation and oxidative burst. Conclusions: Given the fact that β-glucans can be up to 100 fold more concentrated in organic dust than LPS, these results suggest that β-glucans could play a major role in macrophages impairment following heavy dust exposure and will deserve further investigation in the near future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (7 ULg)
See detailEvaluation of original dual thromboxane A2 modulators as anti-angiogenic agents
Dassesse, Thibaut; de Leval, Xavier; Dogné, Jean-Michel et al

Scientific conference (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of original dual thromboxane A2 modulators as antiangiogenic agents
de Leval, Xavier; Dassesse, Thibaut; Dogné, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (The) (2006), 318(3), 1057-1067

Angiogenesis is a promising target for the therapy of several diseases including cancer. This study was undertaken to characterize the antiangiogenic properties of a series of original dual thromboxane A ... [more ▼]

Angiogenesis is a promising target for the therapy of several diseases including cancer. This study was undertaken to characterize the antiangiogenic properties of a series of original dual thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) inhibitors derived from torasemide, a marketed loop diuretic with TXA(2) antagonistic properties, by evaluating their effects on human endothelial cell migration, adhesion, and viability in vitro, as well as in the ex vivo rat aortic ring assay. All drugs tested exhibited a marked affinity toward human platelet TXA(2) receptor, significantly prevented platelet aggregation induced by U-46,619, a stable TXA(2) receptor agonist, and inhibited platelet TXA(2) synthase without affecting cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 or COX-2 enzymatic activities. These dual TXA(2) inhibitors dose dependently inhibited endothelial cell migration in chemotaxis assays using vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF) as a chemoattractant but failed to affect cell adhesion and viability. The highest rates of cell migration inhibition were obtained with original compounds BM-567 and BM-573 (50.3 and 59.4% inhibition, respectively) when used at the final concentration of 10 mu M. In addition, pretreatment of endothelial cells with these two drugs significantly prevented U-46,619-induced intracellular Ca2+ pool mobilization, thus suggesting a mechanistic link between inhibition of the TXA(2) pathway and reduced endothelial cell migration. Treatment of rat aortic explants with U-46,619 (9,11- dideoxy- 9,11- methanoepoxyprostaglandin F 2) significantly enhanced vessel sprouting whereas aortic rings treated with some of the compounds, including BM-567 (N-n-pentyl-N'-[2-(cyclohexylamino)-5-nitrobenzenesulfonyl] urea) and BM-573 (N-tert-butyl-N'-[5-nitro-2p- toluylaminobenzenesulfonyl]urea), showed a significant decrease in vessel sprouting, which was not reversed by the addition of VEGF. These data suggest that our original dual TXA(2) inhibitors bear antiangiogenic properties, mainly by inhibiting endothelial cell migration. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (12 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of oscillometric devices for detection of hypotension in anaesthetized dogs.
Gommeren, Kris ULg; Peyron, Clémence ULg; Lacoste-Garanger, Nicolas ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 9th EVECCS Annual meeting (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (8 ULg)