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See detailEvaluation of GnRH treatment 12 days after AI in the reproductive performance of dairy cows
Szenci, Otto; Takacs, Edit; Sulon, Joseph ULg et al

in Theriogenology (2006), 66(8), 1811-1815

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of GnRH administered at Day 12 post-AI on the reproductive performance of dairy cows. Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (n = 103) on a large Hungarian ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of GnRH administered at Day 12 post-AI on the reproductive performance of dairy cows. Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (n = 103) on a large Hungarian dairy farm were allocated randomly to treated (n = 54) or control (n = 49) groups. Twelve days after AI, treated cows received a GnRH agonist i.m., while the control group received a placebo (physiological saline). Progesterone radioimmunoassay was used to determine the correct timing of artificial insemination (Day 0) and the incidence of luteal insufficiency on Day 12. Ultrasonography and radioimmunoassay for pregnancy-associated glycoprotein were used to detect pregnancy and late embryonic/fetal mortality between Days 32 and 55 after AI. Three cows from each group were inseminated when progesterone concentrations were > 1.0 ng/mL, and six cows (four from the treated and two from the control group) had luteal insufficiency (progesterone < 1.0 ng/mL) on Day 12. Late embryonic/fetal mortality occurred in three treated cows and in two control cows. When these cows were removed from the model, calving rates after first service were 59.6% (28/47) and 59.1% (26/44) for treated and control cows, respectively (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference between treated and control cows when they were inseminated before or after Day 100 from calving. In summary, administration of a GnRH agonist on Day 12 after AI did not improve reproductive performance in dairy cows. However, our approach may be used for the field evaluation of different treatment protocols. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe evaluation of grain shear stress from experiments in a pebble-bedded flume
Petit, François ULg

in Earth Surface Processes & Landforms (1989)

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See detailEvaluation of grain shear stresses required to initiate movement of particles in natural rivers
Petit, François ULg

in Earth Surface Processes & Landforms (1990)

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See detailEvaluation of Heat Stress Effects on Production Traits and Somatic Cell Score of Holsteins in a Temperate Environment
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Bormann, Jeanne; M'Hamdi, Naceur et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2013), 96(3), 1844-1855

This study was aimed to evaluate the degree of thermal stress exhibited by Holsteins under a continental temperate climate. Milk, fat, protein, and somatic cell count test-day records collected between ... [more ▼]

This study was aimed to evaluate the degree of thermal stress exhibited by Holsteins under a continental temperate climate. Milk, fat, protein, and somatic cell count test-day records collected between 2000 and 2011 from 23,963 cows in 604 herds were combined with meteorological data from 14 public weather stations in Luxembourg. Daily values of six different thermal indices (TI) weighted in term of temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed were calculated by averaging hourly TI over 24 hours. Heat stress thresholds were firstly identified by a broken-line regression model. Regression models were thereafter applied to quantify milk production losses due to heat stress. The tipping points at which milk and protein yields declined were effectively identified. For fat yield, no valid threshold was identified for any of the studied TI. Daily fat yields tended to decrease steadily with increasing values of TI. Daily somatic cell scores (SCS) pattern was marked by increased values at both lowest and highest TI ranges with a more pronounced reaction to cold stress for apparent temperature indices. Thresholds differed between TI and traits. For production traits, they ranged from 62 (TI1) to 80 (TI3) for temperature-humidity indices (THI) and from 16 (TI5) to 20 (TI6) for apparent temperature indices. Corresponding SCS thresholds were higher and ranged from 66 (TI1) to 82 (TI3) and from 20 (TI5) to 23 (TI6), respectively. The largest milk decline per unit of mild, moderate, and extreme heat stress levels of 0.164, 0.356, and 0.955 kg, respectively, was observed when using the conventional THI (TI1). The highest yearly milk, fat, and protein losses of 54, 5.7, and 4.2 kg respectively were detected by TI2, the THI index that is adjusted for wind speed and solar radiation. The latter index could be considered as the best indicator of heat stress to be used for forecast and herd management in a first step in temperate regions under anticipated climate changes. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of heterophile antibodies interference on Liaison PTH (Diasorin)
Cavalier, Etienne ULg; Delanaye, Pierre ULg; Carlisi, Ignazia ULg et al

in Clinical Chemistry & Laboratory Medicine (2007, June), 45

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See detailEvaluation of high resolution Russian satellite photographs for map revision up to the scale 1:25,000
Muller, Fabrice; Donnay, Jean-Paul ULg; Kaczynski, Roman

in Proceedings of the ISPRS Commission IV meeting (1994)

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See detailEvaluation of host defense mechanisms and improvement after trauma
Damas, Pierre ULg

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1983), 34(3), 151-153

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See detailEvaluation of Housing Heat Gains due to Metabolism, Artificial Lighting, Appliances and Domestic Hot Water User
Hauglustaine, Jean-Marie ULg

(1981, October)

The evaluation of sensible heat gains due to house occupancy is possible by taking into account the family occupancy pattern, the main source of information that gives up: - the rooms occupied by any ... [more ▼]

The evaluation of sensible heat gains due to house occupancy is possible by taking into account the family occupancy pattern, the main source of information that gives up: - the rooms occupied by any member of the family (with the activity realized at each moment of the day) ; - the use of domestic hot water ; - the use of appliances. Two household occupancy patterns are chose, corresponding to most common families. The calculation of incidental heat gains due to metabolism takes into account radiative and convective exchange from human body to its ambiance. The activities realized along the day are known, and so on the illumination levels. The necessary artificial lighting electrical power and the periods of switching-on are determined with the help of simplified methods. Heat losses wasted at production, storage, distribution and use of domestic hot water are situated. Internal heat gains lost by domestic appliances (gas or electric cooker, refrigerator, deep-freezer…) are estimated taking into account characteristics (volume, size) of appliance and for a typical use. Then internal heat gains due to human occupancy become possible to evaluate hour by hour and room by room, which is interesting for estimation of peak overheating temperature or decrement of consign temperature. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus De Geer (Diptera: Syrphidae) oviposition behaviour toward aphid-infested plants using a leaf disc system.
Almohamad, Raki; Verheggen, François ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2006), 71(2 Pt B), 403-12

Several aphidophagous beneficials such as parasitoids and predators are known to respond positively to aphid infested plants. Semiochemicals from the latter association play an important role in the ... [more ▼]

Several aphidophagous beneficials such as parasitoids and predators are known to respond positively to aphid infested plants. Semiochemicals from the latter association play an important role in the foraging of predators in a tritrophic approach. In this work, three host plants infested with green peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer were used to study the effect of prey density and aphid colony location on plant toward Episyrphus balteatus female. Their reproductive behaviour and efficiency (in terms of fecundity) were observed in net cages. Three kinds of experiments were performed using a disc leaf on agar diet in small Petri dishes under different conditions: 1) leaf disc of broad bean (Vicia faba) were infested with different aphid prey densities, 2) three host plants (Vicia faba, Solanum tuberosum, Solanum nigrum) infested with 3 different aphid prey densities and 3) three different heights of aphid colony location on V. faba plant infested with constant aphid density were also tested using leaf disc system. Aphid-free leaf discs were also used as control for predator behaviour observations. Oviposition rates of hoverfly on leaf disc system vary significantly with prey aphid densities. The means of eggs per laying were 0.9, 5.3, and 31.2 for 0, 10 and 100 aphid densities respectively. E. balteatus females were also able to evaluate and adjust oviposition rates according to different aphid prey densities/host plant. The 5 and 20 cm stakes were the most attractive heights of aphid colony location for the hoverfly oviposition. The means of eggs per laying were 16.7, 18.5 and 5.8 for 5, 20 and 40cm heights respectively. Our leaf disc system was found to be a practical and efficient way to assess chemical cues from aphids according to different conditions on the hoverfly reproductive behaviour. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of hydrolysor catheter of iliocval thrombosis in pigs
Dondelinger; Brkjacic; Trotteur et al

Poster (1995)

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See detailEvaluation of immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a Microsporum canis metalloprotease subunit vaccine in guinea pigs
Vermout, S.; Brouta, F.; Descamps, F. et al

Conference (2004)

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See detailEvaluation of immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a Microsporum canis metalloprotease subunit vaccine in guinea pigs.
Vermout, Sandy M; Brouta, Frederic D; Descamps, Frederic F et al

in FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology (2004), 40(1), 75-80

In order to identify protective immunogens against Microsporum canis infection, a purified recombinant keratinolytic metalloprotease (r-MEP3) was tested as a subunit vaccine in experimentally infected ... [more ▼]

In order to identify protective immunogens against Microsporum canis infection, a purified recombinant keratinolytic metalloprotease (r-MEP3) was tested as a subunit vaccine in experimentally infected guinea pigs. Both humoral and cellular specific immune responses developing towards r-MEP3 were evaluated, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by in vitro lymphocyte transformation tests respectively. Vaccination induced a strong antibody response, and a significant but transient lymphoproliferative response against the protein. However, the protocol failed to prevent fungal invasion or development of dermatophytic lesions. These results show that under the present experimental conditions, r-MEP3 specific antibodies are not protective against a challenge exposure. They also suggest that in the same model, the induction of cell-mediated immunity towards r-MEP3 is not sufficient, indicating the need for further research in the field of specific immune mechanisms involved in M. canis dermatophytosis. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of implantation procedures for PIT tagging juvenile Nile tilapia
Baras, E.; Westerloppe, L.; Mélard, Charles ULg et al

in North American Journal of Aquaculture (1999), 61

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See detailEvaluation of in Vitro Reconstituted Basement Membrane Assay to Assess the Invasiveness of Tumor Cells
Simon, N.; Noël, Agnès ULg; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg

in Invasion & Metastasis (1992), 12(3-4), 156-67

The crossing of tumor cells through basement membranes represents a critical step in the metastatic process. We have used a reconstituted basement membrane (matrigel) coated on filter in a Boyden chamber ... [more ▼]

The crossing of tumor cells through basement membranes represents a critical step in the metastatic process. We have used a reconstituted basement membrane (matrigel) coated on filter in a Boyden chamber to assess the invasive potential of tumor and normal cells. No correlation was found between chemoinvasion in vitro and the metastatic potential in vivo. Normal human fibroblasts and murine 3T3 fibroblasts penetrated filters coated with matrigel. On the other hand, the tumoral cells (MCF7, MCF7 gpt, MCF7 ras, BeWo, JAR, NUC-1 cells) were unable to cross the matrix. Our results suggest that in our conditions, this widely used model to assess tumoral invasion does not provide a universal assay to test the invasiveness of tumor cells. Penetration of the matrigel appears to be related to chemotactic or haptotactic responses depending upon cell types. Our data emphasize the variability of molecular events associated with basement membrane invasion. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of in vivo biocompatibility of different devices for interventional closure of the patent ductus arteriosus in an animal model
Sigler, M.; Handt, S.; SEGHAYE, Marie-Christine ULg et al

in Heart (2000), 83(5), 570-3

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the in vivo biocompatibility of three different devices following interventional closure of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in an animal model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A medical ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the in vivo biocompatibility of three different devices following interventional closure of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in an animal model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A medical grade stainless steel coil (n = 8), a nickel/titanium coil (n = 10), and a polyvinylalcohol foam plug knitted on a titanium wire frame (n = 11) were used for interventional closure of PDA in a neonatal lamb model. The PDA had been maintained by repetitive angioplasty. Between one and 278 days after implantation the animals were killed and the ductal block removed. In addition to standard histology and scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemical staining for biocompatibility screening was also undertaken. RESULTS: Electron microscopy revealed the growth of a cellular layer in a cobblestone pattern on the implant surfaces with blood contact, which was completed as early as five weeks after implantation of all devices. Immunohistochemical staining of these superficial cells showed an endothelial cell phenotype. After initial thrombus formation causing occlusion of the PDA after implantation there was ingrowth of fibromuscular cells resembling smooth muscle cells. Transformation of thrombotic material was completed within six weeks in the polyvinylalcohol plug and around the nickel/titanium coil, and within six months after implantation of the stainless steel coil. An implant related foreign body reaction was seen in only one of the stainless steel coil specimens and in two of the nickel/titanium coil specimens. CONCLUSION: After implantation, organisation of thrombotic material with ingrowth of fibromuscular cells was demonstrated in a material dependent time pattern. The time it took for endothelium to cover the implants was independent of the type of implant. Little or no inflammatory reaction of the surrounding tissue was seen nine months after implantation. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of inflammatory cells in abdominal aortic aneurysmal wall by tomography emission positron
Sakalihasan, Natzi ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Gomez, Pierre et al

in Médecine Nucléaire : Imagerie Fonctionnelle et Métabolique (2009), 33/5

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See detailEvaluation of instability hazards in rock masses influenced by mining works in the coal basin of Liege.
Schroeder, Christian ULg; Flamion, B.; Berger, J.-L. et al

in Post-Mining 2008 (2008, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (6 ULg)
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See detailEvaluation of insulin-like growth factor-I and its plasma binding proteins in pigs.
Renaville, Robert ULg; Prandi, A.; Claes, Victor et al

in Archivio Veterinario Italiano (1996), 46

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)