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See detailEfficacy and tolerability of once-monthly oral ibandronate in postmenopausal osteoporosis: 2 Year results from the MOBILE study (Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2006) 65, (654-661))
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Adami, S.; Lakatos, P. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008), 67(2), 280

[No abstract available]

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See detailEfficacy and tolerability of rimonabant in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled study.
Scheen, André ULg; Finer, Nick; Hollander, Priscilla et al

in Lancet (2006), 368(9548), 1660-72

BACKGROUND: Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid type 1 receptor blocker, reduces bodyweight and improves cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in non-diabetic overweight or obese patients. The aim of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid type 1 receptor blocker, reduces bodyweight and improves cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in non-diabetic overweight or obese patients. The aim of the RIO-Diabetes trial was to assess the efficacy and safety of rimonabant in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes that was inadequately controlled by metformin or sulphonylureas. METHODS: 1047 overweight or obese type 2 diabetes patients (body-mass index 27-40 kg/m2) with a haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentration of 6.5-10.0% (mean 7.3% [SD 0.9] at baseline) already on metformin or sulphonylurea monotherapy were given a mild hypocaloric diet and advice for increased physical activity, and randomly assigned placebo (n=348), 5 mg/day rimonabant (360) or 20 mg/day rimonabant (339) for 1 year. Two individuals in the 5 mg/day group did not receive double-blind treatment and were thus not included in the final analysis. The primary endpoint was weight change from baseline after 1 year of treatment. Analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00029848. FINDINGS: 692 patients completed the 1 year follow-up; numbers in each group after 1 year were much the same. Weight loss was significantly greater after 1 year in both rimonabant groups than in the placebo group (placebo: -1.4 kg [SD 3.6]; 5 mg/day: -2.3 kg [4.2], p=0.01 vs placebo; 20 mg/day: -5.3 kg [5.2], p<0.0001 vs placebo). Rimonabant was generally well tolerated. The incidence of adverse events that led to discontinuation was slightly greater in the 20 mg/day rimonabant group, mainly due to depressed mood disorders, nausea, and dizziness. INTERPRETATION: These data indicate that 20 mg/day rimonabant, in combination with diet and exercise, can produce a clinically meaningful reduction in bodyweight and improve HbA1c and a number of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by metformin or sulphonylureas. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and tolerability of sumatriptan tablets in a fast-disintegrating, rapid-release formulation for the acute treatment of migraine: Results of a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled study
Carpay, J.; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Ahmad, F. et al

in Clinical Therapeutics (2004), 26(2), 214-223

Background: Sumatriptan tablets have been developed in a fast-disintegrating, rapid-release formulation designed to facilitate tablet disintegration and drug dispersion and to potentially mitigate the ... [more ▼]

Background: Sumatriptan tablets have been developed in a fast-disintegrating, rapid-release formulation designed to facilitate tablet disintegration and drug dispersion and to potentially mitigate the effects of gastric stasis that can accompany migraine. Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of sumatriptan 50- and 100-mg tablets in a fast-disintegrating, rapid-release formulation compared with those of placebo in patients with migraine. Methods: This clinical trial had a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design. Exclusion criteria included >6 migraines monthly during either of the 2 months before screenings uncontrolled hypertension; suspected or confirmed cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, and ophthalmic, basilar, or hemiplegic migraine. Sumatriptan 50 and 100 mg and placebo were taken on an outpatient basis during the mild-pain phase of a single migraine attack. Patients recorded details of the treated migraine on a diary card and rated pain severity immediately before dosing and 30 minutes, 45 minutes, I hour, and 2 hours after dosing using a 4-point scale (from 0 = none to 3 = severe). The primary efficacy end point was the proportion of patients who were pain free 2 hours after dosing. Additional efficacy end points were the proportion of patients who were pain free at 30 minutes, 45 minutes, and 1 hour after dosing, the proportion who were migraine free through 2 hours after dosing; and the proportion with a sustained pain-free response. Results: Patients' mean age ranged from 39.7 to 41.5 years across the 3 groups, and the majority were women (79.7%-85.9%) and white (98.7%-100%). One hundred thirty-seven patients received sumatriptan 50 mg, 142 sumatriptan 100 mg, and 153 placebo. In the intent-to-treat population (n = 432), 51.1% of patients who received sumatriptan 50 mg and 66.2% of patients who received sumatriptan 100 mg were pain free 2 hours after dosing, compared with 19.6% of the placebo group (P < 0.001, each sumatriptan dose vs placebo). In an exploratory analysis, the 2-hour pain-free rate with sumatriptan 100 mg was significantly better than that with sumatriptan 50 mg (P = 0.007). Significantly more patients who received sumatriptan 100 mg were pain free compared with placebo at 30 minutes (P < 0.01), 45 minutes (P < 0.001), and 1 hour after dosing (P < 0.001); similar pain-free results were observed in patients who received sumatriptan 50 mg at 45 minutes (P < 0.05) and 1 hour (P < 0.01). In the per-protocol population (n = 313), pain-free efficacy 2 hours after dosing was 52.7% with sumatriptan 50 mg and 74.8% with sumatriptan 100 mg, compared with 21.0% with placebo (P < 0.001, each sumatriptan dose VS placebo). These rates were greater than those in the overall study population, ∼12.0% of whom treated moderate or severe pain. The only drug-related adverse events reported in ≥3% of patients in any treatment group were nausea and vomiting (<1%, 5%, and 2% in the sumatriptan 50 and 100 mg and placebo groups, respectively), chest symptoms (2 %, 3 %, and 0%), and malaise and fatigue (1%, 3 %, and < 1%). No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions: In this study, sumatriptan tablets in a fast-disintegrating, rapid-release oral formulation provided pain-free efficacy in the acute treatment of migraine. Efficacy was maximized with the 100-mg dose compared with the 50-mg dose, and by treating early when pain was mild. In the intent-to-treat population, 51.1% of patients who received sumatriptan 50 mg and 66.2% of those who received sumatriptan 100 mg were pain free 2 hours after dosing. In the per-protocol population, 3 of 4 patients taking the 100-mg tablets for mild pain within 1 hour of its onset were pain free at 2 hours. Sumatriptan tablets were generally well tolerated. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and tolerance of a new formulation of oral tiludronate (tablet) in the treatment of Paget's disease of bone
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Treves, R; Renier, JC et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1993), 52(S1), 66

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See detailEfficacy and tolerance of a new formulation of oral tiludronate (tablet) in the treatment of Paget's disease of bone
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Treves, R; Renier, JC et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1993), 52(S2), 82

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See detailEfficacy assessment of Candida oleophila (strain O) and Pichia anomala (strain K) against major postharvest diseases of citrus fruits in Morocco.
Lahlali, R.; Serrhini, M. N.; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in comm. appl. biol. sci. Ghent University (2004), 69(4), 601-609

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See detailEfficacy assessment of Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1, a new biocontrol agent, against citrus blue mould in Morocco under the influence of temperature and relative humidity
Lahlali, Rachid; Hamadi, Younes; El Guilli, Mohammed et al

in Biocontrol Science (2011), 56

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See detailThe efficacy in vitro and in vivo of bacteriocin against Erwinia amylovora : comparison of biological and chemical control of fire blight
Jabrane, A.; Deckers, T.; Ledoux, L. et al

in Acta Horticulturae (1996), 411

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See detailThe efficacy of a communication skills training program : is it possible to predict assessment and supportive skills learning among residents?
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Merckaert, I.; Libert, Y. et al

in Psycho-oncology (2010, May), 19(Suppl.2)(1-313), 248

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See detailThe efficacy of a communication skills training program on successive sequences of breaking bad news simulated consultation : A randomized controlled study
Gibon, A.-S.; Merckaert, I.; Libert, Y. et al

in Psycho-oncology (2009, June), 18 (Suppl. 2)

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See detailThe efficacy of a phyto-aromatic ear gel against auricular mange in rabbits and carnivores
Mignon, Bernard ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (1996), 138

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See detailEfficacy of a strontium ranelate 2 G/vitamin D3 1000 UI combination on the correction of vitamin D insufficiency
Rizzoli, R; Dawson-Hughes, B; Kaufman, JM et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, May), 23(S2), 225

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See detailEfficacy of a web-based, center-based or combined physical activity intervention among older adults
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Cloes, Marc ULg

in Health Education Research (2015)

With more social support and environment-centered interventions being recommended in web-based interventions, this study examined the efficacy of three intervention conditions aimed at promoting physical ... [more ▼]

With more social support and environment-centered interventions being recommended in web-based interventions, this study examined the efficacy of three intervention conditions aimed at promoting physical activity (PA) in older adults. The efficacy analyses included the self-reported PA level, stage of change for PA and awareness about PA among participants. Eligible participants (N = 149; M = 65 years old, SD = 6), recruited in a unique Belgian French-speaking municipality, were randomized in four research arms for a 3-month intervention: (i) web-based; (ii) center-based; (iii) mixed (combination of web- and center-based); and (iv) control (no intervention). Web-based condition included a PA website and monthly tailored emails whereas center-based condition comprised 12 sessions (1 per week) of group exercising. With a significant increase in PA, the PA stage of change and the PA awareness at 12 months, the mixed intervention condition seemed to include the key social and motivating elements for sustainable behavior change. Center-based intervention was more likely to produce significant improvements of the PA level and the stage of change for PA change whereas web-based intervention was more likely to extend the awareness about PA. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy of alphacalcidol and calcitriol in primary and corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis: a meta-analysis of their effects on bone mineral density and fracture rate
Richy, Florent Y; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2003, September), 48(number 9 (suppl.)), 214

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See detailEfficacy of alphacalcidol and calcitriol in primary and corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis: a meta-analysis of their effects on bone mineral density and fracture rate
Richy, F.; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2004), 15(4), 301-310

Vitamin D metabolites alphacalcidol and calcitriol (D-hormones) have been investigated for two decades, but few and conflicting results are available from high-quality randomized controlled trials. Our ... [more ▼]

Vitamin D metabolites alphacalcidol and calcitriol (D-hormones) have been investigated for two decades, but few and conflicting results are available from high-quality randomized controlled trials. Our objectives were to provide an evidence-based update quantitatively summarizing their efficacy on bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture rate. We performed a systematic research of any randomized controlled trial containing relevant data, peer review, data extraction and quality scoring blinded for authors and data sources, and comprehensive meta-analyses of the relevant data. Inclusion criteria were: randomized controlled study, calcitriol or alphacalcidol, BMD or fractures in healthy/osteopenic/osteoporotic patients exposed or not to corticosteroids (CS). Analyses were performed in a conservative fashion using professional dedicated softwares and stratified by outcome, target patients, study quality, and control-group type. Results were expressed as effect size (ES) for bone loss or relative risk (RR) for fracture while allocated to D-hormones vs control. Publication bias and robustness were investigated. Of the trials that were retrieved and subsequently reviewed, 17 papers fitted the inclusion criteria and were assessed. Quality scores ranged from 20 to 100%, the mean (standard deviation) being 72 (22)%. Calcitriol and alphacalcidol were found to have the same efficacy on all outcomes at p>0.13. We globally assessed D-hormones effects in preventing bone loss in patients not exposed to CS, and found positive effect: ES=0.39 (p<0.001). For lumbar spine, this particular effect was 0.43 (p<0.001). D-hormones significantly reduced the overall fracture rates: RR=0.52 (0.46; 0.59) and both vertebral and non-vertebral fractures: RR=0.53 (0.47; 0.60) and RR=0.34 (0.16; 0.71), respectively. No statistical difference in response was observed between results from studies on healthy and osteoporotic patients or depending on the fact that controls were allowed to calcium supplementation. Treatment with D-hormones was evaluated for maintaining spinal bone mass in five trials of patients with CS-induced osteoporosis, and provided ES=0.43 at p<0.001. Only two studies specifically addressed the effects of calcitriol on spinal fracture rate. None of them provided significant results, and the global RR did not reach the significance level as well: RR=0.33 (0.07; 1.51). Our data demonstrated efficacy for DH on bone loss and fracture prevention in patients not exposed to CS and on bone loss in patients exposed to CS, in the light of the most reliable scientific evidence. Their efficacy in reducing the number of fractures in patients exposed to CS remains to be determined. [less ▲]

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