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See detailAn Early Devonian flora, including Cooksonia from the Paraná Basin (Brazil)
Gerrienne, Philippe ULg; Bergamaschi, S.; Pereira, E. et al

in Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology (2001), 116

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See detailThe Early Devonian plants from the Ancenis Basin (Armorican Massif, France): one century later...
Strullu-Derrien, Marie-Christine; Gerrienne, Philippe ULg

Conference (2008)

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See detailEarly diagenesis of skeletal remains in marine sediments : a 10 years study
Poulicek, Mathieu ULg; Goffinet, Gerhard ULg; Jeuniaux, Charles ULg et al

in Bulletin de la Société royale de Liège (1988), 57(4-5), 313-330

A 10 years long expereimental approach of weathering processes affecting "fresh" organoclastic material at various depths (0-4800 meters) in different regions of the world allowed us to characterize, from ... [more ▼]

A 10 years long expereimental approach of weathering processes affecting "fresh" organoclastic material at various depths (0-4800 meters) in different regions of the world allowed us to characterize, from an ecological point of view, the endolithic populations and associated microorganisms and to evaluate their role in the maturation of organoclastic sediments. We defined the rules governing the settling, growth and succession patterns of the microborers populations depend on environmental conditions (depth, t°, pO2, ...) in a way that will enable future modelisation work. From a general point of view, the prime alteration affecting skeletal remains is of biological origin. It is due to microorganisms growing onto and inside the skeletons, at the precise level of the organic matrices, that weather the organic compounds of these matrices by discharging specific hydrolases at their contact. A fast step of extraction of the most labile compounds (high speed constant) precedes a much slower biodegradation step of refractory compounds. Anaerobic biodegradation takes place after aeroibic biodegradation. Other kinds of microorganisms appear implicated but anaerobic biodegradation processes do not intrinsically differ and do not develop slowlier. Its apparent slowness mainly proceeds from the fact that only refractory compounds of the skeletal matrices usually reach the anoxic layers of the sediments. Anaerobic microbiocenoses associated with skeletal carbonates appear adapted to the biodegradation of such less labile compounds of the organic matrices. Early biological diagenesis events have important repercussions on other diagenetic, physical as well as chemical processes. From a mechanical standpoint, the biological extraction of the organic "cement" between skeletal crystallites fasten abrasion processes by reducing the general cohesion of the skeleton. Moreover, grazing and browsing organisms seeking for endolithic microflora contribute to such abrasion and disruption phenomenons. This leads to an appeciable increase of the CaCO3 content of the fine grain size fraction of sediments. From a chemical point of view, the disparition of the organic sheaths protecting CaCO3 joined to crushing and abrasion effects greatly increase the carbonate dissolution phenomenons and, paradoxally, even in thermodynamically supersaturated media like shallow tropical environment. From that point of view, the importance of high magnesian calcites, their microstructures and organic content, have to be stressed in connection with the control of the buffering capacity of marine waters. [less ▲]

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See detailEarly diagnosis of myocardial infarction by measuring the tissue isoform of CK-MB in serum
Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg

in Annales de Biologie Clinique (1993), 51

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See detailEarly diagnosis of myocardial infarction using a new automated immunoassay for serum myoglobin
Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg; El Allaf, Dia ULg

in European Heart Journal Supplements : Journal of the European Society of Cardiology (1993), 14(Abs. suppl.), 32

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See detailEarly Earth biosphere and possible spectral biosignatures in atmospheres of exoplanets
Riaud, Pierre; Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2005)

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See detailEarly Earth, extremophiles and Exobiology
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2005)

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See detailEarly effect of hyaluronic acid intra-articular injections on serum and urine biomarkers in patients with knee osteoarthritis: An open-label observational prospective study.
Conrozier, T.; Balblanc, J. C.; Richette, P. et al

in Journal of Orthopaedic Research (2011)

The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of hyaluronic acid (HA) intra articular injections (IA) on osteoarthritis (OA) biomarkers in patients with knee OA. Prospective open label study. Fifty ... [more ▼]

The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of hyaluronic acid (HA) intra articular injections (IA) on osteoarthritis (OA) biomarkers in patients with knee OA. Prospective open label study. Fifty-one patients with unilateral symptomatic K-OA received IA injections of 2mL of HA on days (D) 1, 7, 14 and were followed 3 months. At D-15 patients were examined and X-rays performed, to exclude patients with bilateral K-OA, or those with more than three symptomatic OA joints. From 15 days (D-15) before the first injection to D90 concomitant therapies were unchanged. Walking pain (WP) on VAS was obtained at each visit. Urine (U) and serum (S) samples were obtained at D-15, D1, D30, and D90. S-C2C, S-Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, S-HA, S-CS 846 epitope, S-type II collagen propeptide, and U-type II collagen C telopeptide (U-CTX II/creatinin) were assayed. Predictive factors of response were analyzed using logistic regression. Correlations between variables were obtained using Spearman test. Forty-five patients were analyzed. Between D-15 and D1 there was no difference for any biomarkers At D1, WP (SD) was correlated with U-CTX II/creat (p = 0.006). Between D1 and D90: U-CTX II/creat decreased significantly. After adjustment for confounding variables there was a significant correlation between clinical response and U-CTX II/creat variation. U-CTX II and S-HA at baseline were independently predictive of clinical response. This study showed that 90 days after HA IA injections, U-CTX II levels significantly decrease compared to baseline, suggesting a slowdown of type II collagen degradation. (c) 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. [less ▲]

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See detailEarly effect of strontium ranelate on clinical vertebral fractures in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis
Meunier, P. J.; Marquis, P.; Lemmel, E. M. et al

in BONE (2003), 32(S7), 222

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See detailThe early eukaryote fossil record
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Jékely, Gáspár (Ed.) Evolution of the Eukaryotic Endomembrane System and Cytoskeleton (2006)

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See detailEarly eukaryotes in Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic oceans
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; Marshall, C.; Xiao, S. et al

Poster (2004)

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See detailEarly eukaryotic diversification
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; knoll, A. H.; Walter, M.

Conference (2002)

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See detailThe early eukaryotic fossa record
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (2007), 607

The Precambrian era records the evolution of the domain Eucarya. Although the taxonomy of fossils is often impossible to resolve beyond the level of domain, their morphology and chemistry indicate the ... [more ▼]

The Precambrian era records the evolution of the domain Eucarya. Although the taxonomy of fossils is often impossible to resolve beyond the level of domain, their morphology and chemistry indicate the evolution of major biological innovations. The late Archean record for eukaryotes is limited to trace amounts of biomarkers. Morphological evidence appears in late Paleoproterozoic and early Mesoproterozoic (1800-1300 Ma) rocks. The moderate diversity of preservable eukaryotic organisms includes cell walls without surface ornament (but with complex ultrastructure), with regularly distributed surface ornamentation, and with irregularly or regularly arranged processes. Collectively, these fossils suggest that eukaryotes with flexible membranes and cytoskeletons existed in mid-Proterozoic oceans. The late Mesoproterozoic-early Neoproterozoic (1300-750 Ma) is a time of diversification and evolution when direct evidence for important biological innovations occurs in the fossil record such as multicellularity, sex, photosynthesis, biomineralization, predation, and heterotrophy. Members of extant clades can be recognized and include bangiophyte red algae, xanthophyte algae, cladophorale green algae, euglyphid, lobose, and filose amoebae and possible fungi. In the late Neoproterozoic, besides more diversification of ornamented fossils, florideophyte red algae and brown algae diversify, and animals take the stage. The record of biological innovations documented by the fossils shows that eukaryotes had evolved most cytological and molecular complexities very early in the Proterozoic but environmental conditions delayed their diversification within clades until oxygen level and predation pressure increased significantly. [less ▲]

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See detailEarly Evidence of Complexity in Lithic Economy: Core-axe Production, Hafting and Use at Late Middle Pleistocene site 8-B-11, Sai Island (Sudan)
Rots, Veerle ULg; Van Peer, Philip

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2006), 33(3), 360-371

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See detailEarly evolution of large micro-organisms with cytological complexity revealed by microanalyses of 3.4 Ga organic-walled microfossils.
Sugitani; Mimura, K; Takeuchi, M et al

in Geobiology (2015)

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