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See detailExercise modifies the innate immune response in equine bronchial epithelial cells
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Pirottin, Dimitri ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (University of Liege - Belgium) (2013)

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See detailExercise physiology in jumping horses
Art, Tatiana ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg; Desmecht, Daniel ULg et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1991)

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See detailExercise pulmonary hypertension in asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation
Magne, Julien ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Pierard, Luc ULg

in Circulation (2010), 122(1), 33-41

BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend mitral valve surgery for asymptomatic patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation and preserved left ventricular systolic function when exercise ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend mitral valve surgery for asymptomatic patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation and preserved left ventricular systolic function when exercise pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is present. However, the determinants of exercise PHT have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to identify the echocardiographic predictors of exercise PHT and the impact on symptoms. <br /> <br />METHODS AND RESULTS: Comprehensive resting and exercise transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 78 consecutive patients (age, 61+/-13 years; 56% men) with at least moderate degenerative mitral regurgitation (effective regurgitant orifice area =43+/-20 mm(2); regurgitant volume =71+/-27 mL). Exercise PHT was defined as a systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP) >60 mm Hg. Exercise PHT was present in 46% patients. In multivariable analysis, exercise effective regurgitant orifice was an independent determinant of exercise SPAP (P<0.0001) and exercise PHT (P=0.002). Resting PHT and exercise PHT were associated with markedly reduced 2-year symptom-free survival (36+/-14% versus 59+/-7%, P=0.04; 35+/-8% versus 75+/-7%, P<0.0001). After adjustment, although the impact of resting PHT was no longer significant, exercise PHT was identified as an independent predictor of the occurrence of symptoms (hazard ratio=3.4; P=0.002). Receiver-operating characteristics curves revealed that exercise PHT (SPAP >56 mm Hg) was more accurate than resting PHT (SPAP >36 mm Hg) in predicting the occurrence of symptoms during follow-up (P=0.032). <br /> <br />CONCLUSIONS: Exercise PHT is frequent in patients with asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation. Exercise mitral regurgitation severity is a strong independent predictor of both exercise SPAP and exercise PHT. Exercise PHT is associated with markedly low 2-year symptom-free survival, emphasizing the use of exercise echocardiography. An exercise SPAP >56 mm Hg accurately predicts the occurrence of symptoms. [less ▲]

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See detailExercise stress echocardiography in healthy horses
Amory, Hélène ULg; Brihoum, M; Debrue, M et al

in Proceedings of the 41st Annual Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) (2002)

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See detailExercise testing in aortic stenosis and in mitral regurgitation
LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg

in Cardiac valvular medicine (2012)

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See detailExercise ventilation inefficiency in heart failure: pathophysiological and clinical significance
Tumminello, G.; Guazzi, M.; LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg et al

in European Heart Journal (2007), 28(6), 673-678

Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome characterized by myocardial dysfunction and a poor prognosis. Among multiple markers of severity, an exercise ventilation inefficiency has important clinical and ... [more ▼]

Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome characterized by myocardial dysfunction and a poor prognosis. Among multiple markers of severity, an exercise ventilation inefficiency has important clinical and prognostic value. The pathophysiology determining exercise ventilatory inefficiency is complex and not definitively clarified. Three different mechanisms have been identified: (i) increased dead space, (ii) early occurrence of lactic acidosis, and (iii) abnormal chemoreflex and/or metaboreflex activity. Besides its prognostic value, abnormal ventilation can be influenced by pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies such as beta-blockers, selective cyclic 3'-5' guanosine monosphosphate phosphodiesterase inhibitors, physical training, and nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure. There is an increasing interest for the exercise periodic breathing, which is frequently associated with HF syndrome and has prognostic importance. The precise mechanisms sustaining exercise periodic breathing are not fully defined but ventilatory and metabo-haemodynamic hypotheses have been proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailExercise Versus Dobutamine-Induced St Elevation in the Infarct-Related Electrocardiographic Leads: Clinical Significance and Correlation with Functional Recovery
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Seidel, Laurence ULg; Hoffer, E. et al

in American Heart Journal (2001), 141(5), 772-9

BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of stress-induced ST elevation early after acute myocardial infarction and its relation to functional recovery remain controversial. The aims of this study were (1 ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of stress-induced ST elevation early after acute myocardial infarction and its relation to functional recovery remain controversial. The aims of this study were (1) to determine the incidence of ST elevation during dobutamine and exercise tests and (2) to assess the relative accuracy of exercise and dobutamine ST elevation for predicting functional recovery after acute myocardial infarction. METHODS AND RESULTS: We investigated 52 patients who underwent supine exercise (from 25 W to maximal charge) and dobutamine (from 5 to 40 microg/kg per minute and up to 1 mg atropine) stress electrocardiography in the same position. ST elevation was defined as new or worsening at >1 mm, 80 ms after J point. Echocardiography and quantitative angiography were available in all patients before hospital discharge. The follow-up resting echocardiogram was recorded 30 +/- 6 days after the acute event. ST elevation developed during 30 (58%) dobutamine and 24 (46%) exercise tests. The sum of ST elevation was higher during dobutamine testing (7.7 +/- 3.8 mm) than during exercise (5.5 +/- 2.5 mm) (P =.03). A low peak creatine kinase level was the single independent predictor of dobutamine-induced ST elevation. Functional improvement occurred in 35 patients. Two independent predictors of functional recovery were selected from multivariate analysis: dobutamine ST elevation (chi(2) = 9.1; P =.0026) and low peak creatine kinase level (chi(2) = 5.1; P =.025). When dobutamine ST elevation was not included in multivariate analysis, exercise-induced ST elevation emerged as an independent predictor of functional recovery (chi(2) = 5.0; P =.023). Significant linear correlation was found between the sum of ST elevation at peak dobutamine stress and the extent of functional recovery (r = 0.87; P <.0001). In contrast, no correlation was observed with exercise ST elevation (r = 0.06; P = not significant). CONCLUSIONS: Stress-induced ST elevation is an ancillary sign of viable myocardium that can recover. The sum of ST elevation at peak dobutamine stress correlates with the extent of functional recovery. [less ▲]

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See detailExercise-induced changes in degenerative mitral regurgitation
Magne, Julien ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Pierard, Luc ULg

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2010), 56(4), 300-309

OBJECTIVES: We sought to quantify exercise-induced changes in patients with degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR), to examine the relationship between exercise-induced changes in MR and in systolic ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: We sought to quantify exercise-induced changes in patients with degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR), to examine the relationship between exercise-induced changes in MR and in systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), and to identify their potential impact on symptom-free survival. BACKGROUND: MR severity can change during exercise in patients with functional MR. Quantified changes in MR severity during exercise remain undetermined in patients with degenerative MR. METHODS: Resting and bicycle exercise Doppler-echocardiography were performed in 61 asymptomatic patients (age 62+/-14 years) with moderate to severe degenerative MR (i.e., mitral valve prolapse or flail). Mitral regurgitation was quantified at rest and exercise with effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area and regurgitant volume calculated with the proximal isovelocity surface area (EROP) and the quantitative Doppler (EROD) methods. RESULTS: At rest, EROP and EROD were well-correlated (r=0.87, p<0.0001), but EROD was larger than EROP (54+/-21 mm2 vs. 42+/-24 mm2, p<0.0001). During exercise, mean ERO and regurgitant volume markedly increased in 32% of patients by >or=10 mm2 and >or=15 ml, respectively. There was good correlation between exercise EROP and EROD (r=0.84, p<0.0001). Changes in systolic PAP were correlated with changes in ERO and regurgitant volume (r=0.59, p=0.02 and r=0.60, p=0.02). Patients with a marked increase in regurgitant volume during exercise had lower symptom-free survival than those in whom MR decreased or remained unchanged (p=0.0015). CONCLUSIONS: Degenerative MR might be dynamic and increases during exercise in one-third of patients. Marked changes in MR severity are associated with exercise-induced changes in systolic PAP and reduced symptom-free survival. [less ▲]

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See detailExercise-induced dystonia as a preceding symptom of familial Parkinson's disease
Bruno, Michiko K; Ravina, Bernard; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Movement Disorders (2004), 19(2), 228-230

Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia can occur with Parkinson's disease (PD), and in rare cases, this can also be the presenting symptom. We report on 2 second cousins (no known consanguinity) who ... [more ▼]

Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia can occur with Parkinson's disease (PD), and in rare cases, this can also be the presenting symptom. We report on 2 second cousins (no known consanguinity) who presented with paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia who later developed clinical features of PD. Although autosomal recessive inheritance was suggested, and the dystonic features further suggest parkin as a possible cause, ssequencing for parkin mutations was negative and this family may represent a genetic variant of PD. Further genotype-phenotype studies in this and similar families may give clues to pre-symptomatic symptoms in PD and may reflect a particular phenotype of interest for genetics studies in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailExercise-induced oxidative stress in overweight adolescent girls: roles of basal insulin resistance and inflammation and oxygen overconsumption.
Youssef, H.; Groussard, C.; Pincemail, Joël ULg et al

in International Journal of Obesity & Related Metabolic Disorders (2009), 33(4), 447-55

HYPOTHESIS: Basal insulin resistance (IR) and inflammation exacerbate post-exercise oxidative stress (OS) in overweight adolescent girls. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study, effect of incremental ergocycle ... [more ▼]

HYPOTHESIS: Basal insulin resistance (IR) and inflammation exacerbate post-exercise oxidative stress (OS) in overweight adolescent girls. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study, effect of incremental ergocycle exercise until exhaustion on OS markers. PARTICIPANTS: Normal-weight (control) (n=17, body mass index (BMI): 20-24.2 kg/m(2)) and overweight adolescent girls (n=29, BMI: 24.1-36.6 kg/m(2)). MEASUREMENTS: Dietary measurement, physical activity assessment (validated questionnaires), fat distribution parameters (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and anthropometry) and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Blood assays include the following: (1) at fasting state: blood cell count, lipid profile, and IR parameters (leptin/adiponectin ratio (L/A), homeostasis model assessment of IR, insulin/glucose ratio; (2) before exercise: inflammation and OS markers (interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG), 15 F(2)alpha-isoprostanes (F(2)-Isop), lipid hydroperoxides (ROOH), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)) and antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), vitamin C, alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene); and (3) after exercise: inflammation and OS markers. RESULTS: At rest, overweight girls had a deteriorated lipid profile and significantly higher values of IR parameters and inflammation markers, compared with the control girls. These alterations were associated with a moderate rest OS state (lower GSH/GSSG ratio, alpha-tocopherol/total cholesterol (TC) ratio and GPX activity). In absolute values, overweight girls exhibited higher peak power output and oxygen consumption (VO2peak), compared with the control girls. Exercise exacerbated OS only in the overweight group (significant increase in F(2)-Isop, ROOH and MPO). As hypothesized, basal IR and inflammation state were correlated with the post-exercise OS. However, the adjustment of F(2)-Isop, ROOH and MPO variation per exercise VO(2) variation canceled the intergroup differences. CONCLUSION: In overweight adolescent girls, the main factors of OS, after incremental exhaustive exercise, are not the basal IR and inflammation states, but oxygen overconsumption. [less ▲]

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See detailExercise-induced physiological adjustments to stressful conditions in sports horses
Art, Tatiana ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Livestock Production Science (2005), 92(2), 101-111

Among athletic/sports animals, the horse has a unique ability to increase its oxygen uptake by a factor of 60 during heavy exercise. This is achieved by physiological adaptations of all the links in the ... [more ▼]

Among athletic/sports animals, the horse has a unique ability to increase its oxygen uptake by a factor of 60 during heavy exercise. This is achieved by physiological adaptations of all the links in the oxygen chain. Ventilation is increased by a factor of 30. Since the horse is a compulsory nasal breather, this hyperpnea necessitates high transmural pressure changes, which may be responsible for the dynamic collapse of the airways. Blood flow is increased by a factor of 10. Since the left ventricle is not very compliant, this increase necessitates a high filling pressure in the pulmonary circulation, which may induce capillary stress failure and exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage. Lastly, oxygen transport is improved by splenic contraction which increases haemoglobinemia by 50%. Sports horses frequently suffer from several problems, which are related either to endogenous or exogenous stresses experienced during their career. These stresses, caused by the use of the horse as a competition animal, may lead to several medical problems. At a systemic level, endogenous stresses include hyperkaliemia, lactacidemia, and hyperthermia; oxidative stress may induce problems at a general, and/or a pulmonary level. External factors, e.g. poor quality of inspired air, transport, hot and humid ambient conditions, and microbiological agents, may also induce abnormal body attacks, and lead to health problems. [less ▲]

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See detailExercise-induced pulmonary perfusion redistribution in heaves
Harmegnies, N. F.; Duvivier, D. H.; Vandenput, Sandrina ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2002), 34(suppl), 478-484

This study aimed to compare exercise-induced pulmonary perfusion redistribution in healthy vs. 'heavey' horses using scintigraphy, a minimally invasive technique. Six healthy (A) and 5 'heavey' horses in ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to compare exercise-induced pulmonary perfusion redistribution in healthy vs. 'heavey' horses using scintigraphy, a minimally invasive technique. Six healthy (A) and 5 'heavey' horses in remission (B(I)) and during clinical signs of disease (B(II)) were investigated. Dimensions of the exercising pulmonary perfusion (QE) images were expressed in percent of the resting perfusion (QR) images. Computed QE to QR ratios (QE/QR) images enabled the definition of the region more perfused at exercise than at rest (R1). In all groups, exercise induced a major enlargement of the Q image but a larger increase of the lung height was found in 'heavey' horses. Compared to A, 'heavey' horses showed a larger R1 region with a significantly higher QE/QR. Location of R1 pointed out the dorsal lung region as a major site of pulmonary perfusion redistribution for all groups. This work demonstrated (1) the feasibility of using scintigraphy for studying exercise-induced pulmonary perfusion redistribution; (2) perfusion redistribution to the dorsal lung with exercise and (3) an intensified redistribution in 'heavey' horses, either clinically affected or not. [less ▲]

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See detailExercises in astronomy.
Kleczek, J.; Minnaert, M. G. J.; Allen, D. A. et al

in Exercises in astronomy.. J. Kleczek (Editor).Revised and extended edition of "Practical work in elementary astronomy" by M. G. J. Minnaert. D. ReidelPublishing Co., Dordrecht, The Netherlands. 24+339 pp. Price Dfl. 140.00, US 64.00, £ 49.50 cloth; Dfl. 59.00, US 19.50, £ 18.00 paper (1987). ISBN 90-277-2409-1 cloth, ISBN 90-277-2423-7 paper. (1987)

This book is an updated and considerably extended version of Minnaert's work published in 1969 (01.003.051).Many new exercises referring to new observational techniques and methods have been incorporated ... [more ▼]

This book is an updated and considerably extended version of Minnaert's work published in 1969 (01.003.051).Many new exercises referring to new observational techniques and methods have been incorporated by the editor in collaboration with the contributing authors D. A. Allen, Z. Ceplechka, S. Ferraz Mello, K. J. Gordon, L. Houziaux, C. Jaschek, Z. Kopal, J. Manfroid, J. PalouÅ¡, J. Podolský, G. R. Quast, J. Surdej, A. B. Underhill, J. M. Vreux, D. G. Wentzel.The exercises are organized in the following sections:A. The planetary system: 1. Space and time, instruments. 2. The motions of celestial bodies. 3. Planets and satellites.B. The stars: 1. The Sun. 2. Stars and nebulae. 3. Stellar systems. [less ▲]

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See detailExérèse microchirurgicale atraumatique intranodulaire d'un schwanome bénin du sciatique poplité externe
LEJEUNE, G; LECLERCQ, Daniel ULg; CARLIER, Alain ULg et al

in Actualités chirurgicales - 81ème Congrès Fr. Chirurgie, Orthopédie, Traumatologie (1980)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)