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See detailDrowsiness monitoring for road safety
Wertz, Jérôme ULg; François, Clémentine ULg; Verly, Jacques ULg

Conference (2013, December 13)

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See detailDrowsiness monitoring: a matter of life and death !
Wertz, Jérôme ULg; François, Clémentine ULg; Verly, Jacques ULg

Conference (2012, March 19)

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See detailDrug consumption in a Belgian subpopulation of peaple older than 45 years
Gosset, Christiane ULg; Tellier, V; De Prins, L et al

Conference (1997)

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See detailDrug delivery systems based on amphiphilic polyphosphate-copolymers
Vanslambrouck, Stéphanie ULg; Clement, Benoît ULg; Riva, Raphaël ULg et al

Poster (2013, September 18)

Thanks to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and their structure similar to natural biomacromoleculesn such as nucleic acids, polyphosphates (PPhos) are of prime interest as biomaterials. In ... [more ▼]

Thanks to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and their structure similar to natural biomacromoleculesn such as nucleic acids, polyphosphates (PPhos) are of prime interest as biomaterials. In contrast to poly--caprolactone and polylactides, PPhos properties and functionality are easily tuned via the nature of the pendant group of the starting cyclic monomer. For example, by varying the length of the alkyl chain the hydrophobicity of the PPhos can be adjusted. In this work, an efficient organo-catalytic system was developed to synthesize a series of amphiphilic diblock copolymers, i.e. poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polyphosphate (PEO-b-PPhos) by ring-opening polymerization of cyclic phosphates. This novel approach prevents metallic residues to polute the final product, and which is highly desirable when biomedical applications are foreseen. For drug delivery application, the micellization of these novel diblock copolymers in aqueous media was investigated, as well as, encapsulation of an hydrophobic drug. Data on, the influence of the polyphosphate nature of the polymer on drug loading will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug delivery systems based on PEO-b-polyphosphate copolymers
Vanslambrouck, Stéphanie ULg; Clément, Benoit; Riva, Raphaël ULg et al

Poster (2014, May)

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See detailDrug delivery to inflamed colon by nanoparticles: comparison of different strategies
Coco, Régis; Plapied, Laurence; Pourcelle, Vincent et al

in International Journal of Pharmaceutics (2013), 440(1), 3-12

For inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment, local delivery of molecules loaded in nanoparticles to the inflamed colon could be a promising strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate how drug ... [more ▼]

For inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment, local delivery of molecules loaded in nanoparticles to the inflamed colon could be a promising strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate how drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles target the site of inflammation and to analyse the influence of different colon-specific delivery strategies. Three different polymeric nanoparticles were formulated using ovalbumin (OVA) as a model drug. pH-sensitive nanoparticles were made with Eudragit® S100. Mucoadhesive nanoparticles were created with trimethylchitosan (TMC). A mix of polymers, PLGA, PEG-PLGA and PEG-PCL, were used to obtain a sustained drug delivery. Furthermore, ligands targeting immune cells (i.e. mannose) or the inflamed colon (i.e. a specific peptide) were grafted on the PEG chain of PCL. Interaction of nanoparticles with the intestinal epithelium was explored using Caco-2 monolayers designed to mimic an inflamed epithelium and then visualized using confocal laser microscopy. TMC nanoparticles had the highest apparent permeability for OVA in the untreated model. However, in the inflamed model, there were no difference between TMC, PLGA-based and Eudragit® nanoparticles. The uptake of nanoparticles in the inflamed mouse colon was assessed in a horizontal diffusion chamber. Mannose-grafted PLGA nanoparticles showed the highest accumulation of OVA in inflamed colon. Based on these results, active targeting of macrophages and dendritic cells may be a promising approach for targeting the colon in IBD. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug eluting stent implantation in patients requiring concomitant vitamin K antagonist therapy. One-year outcome of the worldwide e-SELECT registry.
Sabate, Manel; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Abizaid, Alexandre et al

in International journal of cardiology (2013), 168(3), 2522-7

BACKGROUND: Outcome of sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) in patients treated with an antivitamin K (VKA) agent before the PCI procedure is unknown. METHODS: A total of 7651 patients were selected among 15,147 ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Outcome of sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) in patients treated with an antivitamin K (VKA) agent before the PCI procedure is unknown. METHODS: A total of 7651 patients were selected among 15,147 recipients of SES, included in the worldwide e-SELECT registry, only from those centers which included at least one patient requiring VKA: 296 were pretreated with a VKA agent (VKA group), whereas 7355 patients from the same enrolling medical centers were not (NON-VKA group). The rates of 1) major adverse cardiac events (MACE), including all-cause deaths, myocardial infarction (MI) and target lesion revascularization, 2) stent thrombosis (ST) and 3) major bleeding (MB) in the 2 study groups were compared at 1, 6 and 12 months. RESULTS: The patients in VKA group were on average older as compared to those in NON-VKA group (67.7 +/- 9.9 vs.62.9 +/- 10.7, P<0.001). The indications for pre-procedural anticoagulation were atrial fibrillation in 177 (59.8%), presence of a prosthetic valve in 21 (7.1%), embolization of cardiac origin in 17 (5.7%), pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis in 17 (5.7%), and miscellaneous diagnoses in 64 (21.6%) patients. At 1 year, the rates of MACE and MB were higher in the VKA vs. the NON-VKA group (8.3% and 3% vs. 5.3% and 1.2%, P<0.04 and P<0.002, respectively). The 1-year rates of definite and probable ST were remarkably low in both groups (0.38% vs. 1.1%, p=0.4). CONCLUSIONS: Selected patients anticoagulated with VKA agent may safely undergo SES implantation. Those patients may receive a variety of APT regimen at the cost of a moderate increased risk of MB. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug interactions of clinical importance with antihyperglycaemic agents: an update.
Scheen, André ULg

in Drug Safety : An International Journal of Medical Toxicology & Drug Experience (2005), 28(7), 601-31

Because management of type 2 diabetes mellitus usually involves combined pharmacological therapy to obtain adequate glucose control and treatment of concurrent pathologies (especially dyslipidaemia and ... [more ▼]

Because management of type 2 diabetes mellitus usually involves combined pharmacological therapy to obtain adequate glucose control and treatment of concurrent pathologies (especially dyslipidaemia and arterial hypertension), drug-drug interactions must be carefully considered with antihyperglycaemic drugs. Additive glucose-lowering effects have been extensively reported when combining sulphonylureas (or the new insulin secretagogues, meglitinide derivatives, i.e. nateglinide and repaglinide) with metformin, sulphonylureas (or meglitinide derivatives) with thiazolidinediones (also called glitazones) and the biguanide compound metformin with thiazolidinediones. Interest in combining alpha-glucosidase inhibitors with either sulphonylureas (or meglitinide derivatives), metformin or thiazolidinediones has also been demonstrated. These combinations result in lower glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)), fasting glucose and postprandial glucose levels than with either monotherapy. Even if modest pharmacokinetic interferences have been reported with some combinations, they do not appear to have important clinical consequences. No significant adverse effects, except a higher risk of hypoglycaemic episodes that may be attributed to better glycaemic control, occur with any combination. Challenging the classical dual therapy with sulphonylurea plus metformin, there is a recent trend to use alternative dual combinations (sulphonylurea plus thiazolidinedione or metformin plus thiazolidinedione). In addition, triple therapy with the addition of a thiazolidinedione to the metformin-sulphonylurea combination has been recently evaluated and allows glucose targets to be reached before insulin therapy is considered. This triple therapy appears to be safe, with no deleterious drug-drug interactions being reported so far.Potential interferences may also occur between glucose-lowering agents and other drugs, and such drug-drug interactions may have important clinical implications. Relevant pharmacological agents are those that are widely coadministered in diabetic patients (e.g. lipid-lowering agents, antihypertensive agents); those that have a narrow efficacy/toxicity ratio (e.g. digoxin, warfarin); or those that are known to induce (rifampicin [rifampin]) or inhibit (fluconazole) the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system. Metformin is currently a key compound in the pharmacological management of type 2 diabetes, used either alone or in combination with other antihyperglycaemics. There are no clinically relevant metabolic interactions with metformin, because this compound is not metabolised and does not inhibit the metabolism of other drugs. In contrast, sulphonylureas, meglitinide derivatives and thiazolidinediones are extensively metabolised in the liver via the CYP system and thus, may be subject to drug-drug metabolic interactions. Many HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are also metabolised via the CYP system. Even if modest pharmacokinetic interactions may occur, it is not clear whether drug-drug interactions between oral antihyperglycaemic agents and statins may have clinical consequences regarding both efficacy and safety. In contrast, a marked pharmacokinetic interference has been reported between gemfibrozil and repaglinide and, to a lesser extent, between gemfibrozil and rosiglitazone. This leads to a drastic increase in plasma concentrations of each antihyperglycaemic agent when they are coadministered with the fibric acid derivative, and an increased risk of adverse effects.Some antihypertensive agents may favour hypoglycaemic episodes when co-prescribed with sulphonylureas or meglitinide derivatives, especially ACE inhibitors, but this effect seems to result from a pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction rather than from a pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction. No, or only modest, interferences have been described with glucose-lowering agents and other pharmacological compounds such as digoxin or warfarin. The effects of inducers or inhibitors of CYP isoenzymes on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the glucose-lowering agents of each pharmacological class has been tested. Significantly increased (with CYP inhibitors) or decreased (with CYP inducers) plasma levels of sulphonylureas, meglitinide derivatives and thiazolidinediones have been reported in healthy volunteers, and these pharmacokinetic changes may lead to enhanced or reduced glucose-lowering action, and thus hypoglycaemia or worsening of metabolic control, respectively. In addition, some case reports have evidenced potential drug-drug interactions with various antihyperglycaemic agents that are usually associated with a higher risk of hypoglycaemia. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug Interactions with Normal and TEN Epidermal Keratinocytes.
Paquet, Philippe; Delvenne, Philippe ULg; PIERARD, Gérald ULg

in Current Drug Safety (2012), 7(5), 352-6

Human epidermal keratinocytes (EKs) are metabolically involved in various drug transport mechanisms, as well as in detoxification or activation processes. The overall cell mechanisms of drug ... [more ▼]

Human epidermal keratinocytes (EKs) are metabolically involved in various drug transport mechanisms, as well as in detoxification or activation processes. The overall cell mechanisms of drug metabolization, and more specifically drug processing are reviewed in normal EKs. The overall drug metabolism involves different phases corresponding to the uptake, biotransformation and anti-transport steps. In EKs, both the enzymes and transportassociated proteins are different from those involved in the hepatocyte metabolism. Some cytochrome P450 enzymes and the flavin-containing mono-oxygenases are particularly involved in EKs. Basically, EKs represent key cells likely involved during the initial stage of drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Only limited advances have been made so far in this field. Nevertheless, mitigating EKs metabolic disturbances in TEN probably represent a promising specific treatment of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug loading of polymer implants by supercritical CO2 assisted impregnation: a review
Champeau, Mathilde; Thomassin, Jean-Michel ULg; Tassaing, Thierry et al

in Journal of Controlled Release (2015), 209

Drug loaded implants also called drug-eluting implants have proven their benefits over simple implants. Among the developed manufacturing processes, the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) assisted impregnation has ... [more ▼]

Drug loaded implants also called drug-eluting implants have proven their benefits over simple implants. Among the developed manufacturing processes, the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) assisted impregnation has attracted growing attention to load Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients into polymer implants since it enables to recover a final implant free of any solvent residue and to operate under mild temperature which is suitable for processing with thermosensitive drugs. This paper is a review of the state-of-the-art and the application of the scCO2 assisted impregnation process to prepare drug-eluting implants. It introduces the process and presents its advantages for biomedical applications. The influences of the characteristics of the implied binary systems and of the experimental conditions on the drug loading are described. Then, the various current applications of this process for manufacturing drug-eluting implants are reviewed. Finally, the new emerging variations of this process are described. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug loading of sutures by supercritical CO2 impregnation: effect of polymer/drug interactions and thermal transitions
Champeau, Mathilde; Thomassin, Jean-Michel ULg; Tassaing, Thierry et al

in Macromolecular Materials and Engineering (2015), 300(6), 596-610

This paper aims at exploring the scCO2 impregnation of three commonly implanted polymer sutures made of poly-l-lactide (PLLA), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polypropylene (PP) with two anti ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at exploring the scCO2 impregnation of three commonly implanted polymer sutures made of poly-l-lactide (PLLA), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polypropylene (PP) with two anti-inflammatory drugs namely ketoprofen and aspirin. For all the investigated polymer/drug systems, the drug loading increases with temperature and pressure. It appears that two main criteria must be fulfilled by the polymer to achieve high drug loading: (i) a good affinity between the polymer and the drug and (ii) a high chain mobility to favor the diffusion of the drug into the matrix. As the investigated PLLA fulfills these two requirements, drug loading up to 32.5% with ketoprofen and 8.1% with aspirin has been achieved. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug quality control by capillary electrophoresis
Crommen, Jacques ULg; Bechet, I.; Fillet, Marianne ULg et al

Conference (1994)

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See detailDrug related problems and interventions of pharmacists on prescribed medicines in Belgium
De Wulf, Isabelle; Boussery, Koen; De Vriese, Carine et al

in International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy [=IJCP] (2013, June), 35(3), 497

Aim of project/study (1) To study the frequency and nature of drug related problems (DRP) detected by community pharmacists and internship students when dispensing prescribed medicines. (2) To investigate ... [more ▼]

Aim of project/study (1) To study the frequency and nature of drug related problems (DRP) detected by community pharmacists and internship students when dispensing prescribed medicines. (2) To investigate the nature and frequency of interventions by pharmacists. (3) To study whether there is a difference between DRP detection at the moment of dispensing versus in a quiet setting. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug resistance among therapy-naive HIV-infected patients studied by sequencing and VERSANT (TM) HIV-1 resistance assays (LiPA) has limited impact on treatment response
Derdelinckx, I.; Van Laethem, K.; Maes, B. et al

in Antiviral therapy (2002), 7(Suppl. 1), 181

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See detailDrug sensitivity and clinical aspects of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in african children
Carme, Bernard; Gay, Frédéric; Tirard, Véronique et al

Conference (1994, October)

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See detailDrug treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the 1990s. Achievements and future developments.
Scheen, André ULg

in Drugs (1997), 54(3), 355-68

Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, type 2 diabetes) is a heterogeneous disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. There are various ... [more ▼]

Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, type 2 diabetes) is a heterogeneous disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. There are various pharmacological approaches to improving glucose homeostasis, but those currently used in clinical practice either do not succeed in restoring normoglycaemia in most patients or fail after a variable period of time. For glycaemic regulation, 4 classes of drugs are currently available: sulphonylureas, biguanides (metformin), alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose) and insulin, each of which has a different mode and site of action. These standard pharmacological treatments may be used individually for certain types of patients, or may be combined in a stepwise fashion to provide more ideal glycaemic control for most patients. Adjunct treatments comprise a few pharmacological approaches which may help to improve glycaemic control by correcting some abnormalities frequently associated with NIDDM, such as obesity (serotoninergic anorectic agents) and hyperlipidaemia (benfluorex). There is intensive pharmaceutical research to find new drugs able to stimulate insulin secretion (new sulphonylurea or nonsulphonylurea derivatives, glucagon-like peptide-1), improve insulin action (thiazolidinediones, lipid interfering agents, glucagon antagonists, vanadium compounds) or reduce carbohydrate absorption (miglitol, amylin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1). Further studies should demonstrate the superiority of these new compounds over the standard antidiabetic agents as well as their optimal mode of administration, alone or in combination with currently available drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug use among adolescents: Multifaceted problem and methodological perspectives
Mathys, Cécile ULg

in Special issue, EARA newsletter (2016)

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See detailDrug-delivery implants : Pharmaceutical advantages and current processing technologies
Champeau, Mathilde; Jérôme, Christine ULg; Tassaing, Thierry

Scientific conference (2014, February 25)

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See detailDrug-drug and food-drug pharmacokinetic interactions with new insulinotropic agents repaglinide and nateglinide.
Scheen, André ULg

in Clinical Pharmacokinetics (2007), 46(2), 93-108

This review describes the current knowledge on drug-drug and food-drug interactions with repaglinide and nateglinide. These two meglitinide derivatives, commonly called glinides, have been developed for ... [more ▼]

This review describes the current knowledge on drug-drug and food-drug interactions with repaglinide and nateglinide. These two meglitinide derivatives, commonly called glinides, have been developed for improving insulin secretion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are increasingly used either in monotherapy or in combination with other oral antihyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Compared with sulfonylureas, glinides have been shown to (i) provide a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, (ii) overcome some adverse effects, such as hypoglycaemia, and (iii) have a more favourable safety profile, especially in patients with renal failure.The meal-related timing of administration of glinides and the potential influence of food and meal composition on their bioavailability may be important. In addition, some food components (e.g. grapefruit juice) may cause pharmacokinetic interactions. Because glinides are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 isoenzyme, they are indeed exposed to pharmacokinetic interactions. In addition to CYP3A4, repaglinide is metabolised via CYP2C8, while nateglinide metabolism also involves CYP2C9. Furthermore, both compounds and their metabolites may undergo specialised transport/uptake in the intestine, another source of pharmacokinetic interactions. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are those that occur when glinides are administered together with other glucose-lowering agents or compounds widely coadministered to diabetic patients (e.g. lipid-lowering agents), with drugs that are known to induce (risk of lower glinide plasma levels and thus of deterioration of glucose control) or inhibit (risk of higher glinide plasma levels leading to hypoglycaemia) CYP isoenzymes concerned in their metabolism, or with drugs that have a narrow efficacy : toxicity ratio.Pharmacokinetic interactions reported in the literature appear to be more frequent and more important with repaglinide than with nateglinide. Rifampicin (rifampin) reduced repaglinide area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) by 32-85% while it reduced nateglinide AUC by almost 25%. Reported increases in AUCs with coadministration of drugs inhibiting CYP isoenzymes never exceeded 80% for repaglinide (except with ciclosporin and with gemfibrozil) and 50% for nateglinide. Ciclosporin more than doubled repaglinide AUC (+144%), a finding that should raise caution when using these two drugs in combination. The most impressive pharmacokinetic interaction was reported with combined administration of gemfibrozil (a strong CYP2C8 inhibitor) and repaglinide (8-fold increase in repaglinide AUC). Although no studies have been performed in patients with type 2 diabetes, the latter combination should be avoided in clinical practice. [less ▲]

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