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See detailEndocardite végétante dans l’espèce équine : revue de littérature à partir de 2 cas cliniques
Amory, Hélène ULg; Christmann, U.; Cassart, Dominique ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2000), 144

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (0 ULg)
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See detailEndocardite végétante dans l’espèce équine : revue de littérature à partir de 2 cas cliniques
Amory, Hélène ULg; Christmann; Cassart, Dominique ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1998), 144

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (5 ULg)
See detailEndocarditis del anciano
Valdes Quintana; VALDES SOCIN, Hernan Gonzalo ULg

in Romero Villanueva, Horacio (Ed.) Cardiologia Geriatrica (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEndocarditis in horses: a retrospective study of five cases
Amory, Hélène ULg; Bertrand, P; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 44th Annual Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
See detailEndocrine abnormalities in McCune-Albright syndrome
Tamagno, G.; Petrossians, Patrick ULg; Daly, Adrian ULg et al

in 23ème Congrès de la Société Française d'Endocrinologie - Abstract book (2006)

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See detailThe endocrine control of energy homeostasis in chickens
Decuypere, Eddy; Everaert, Nadia ULg; Song, Zhigang et al

in General and Comparative Endocrinology (2013)

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See detailThe endocrine control of energy homeostasis in chickens.
Song, Zhigang; Everaert, Nadia ULg; Wang, Yufeng et al

in General and comparative endocrinology (2013), 190

Energy homeostasis (balance) depends on the relationship between the amount of consumed feed energy and energy expenditure. Coordination of energy expenditure and feed intake (appetite) is necessary for ... [more ▼]

Energy homeostasis (balance) depends on the relationship between the amount of consumed feed energy and energy expenditure. Coordination of energy expenditure and feed intake (appetite) is necessary for the regulation of body composition. The hypothalamus integrates peripheral and central signals to generate satiety or hunger. Birds and mammals utilize common signaling molecules but some molecules possess different/opposite functions. If relevant, particular differences with the mammalian regulatory system are highlighted in this review. For example, obestatin had no significant effect on feed intake of chicks, but it was claimed to decrease food intake in mammalian species. Ghrelin displayed appetite-stimulating effects in mammals but appetite-decreasing effects in birds. Recently, the function of the hypothalamic AMPK signaling pathway on feed intake regulation has received considerable attention in poultry. Alpha-lipoic acid might exert its appetite-decreasing effect by the AMPK signaling pathway. This review discusses the central regulation of energy homeostasis, role of (an)orexigenic peptides, effect of feed deprivation on hypothalamic neuropeptide gene expression and provides a model for involvement of AMPK in the regulation of avian energy balance. [less ▲]

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See detailEndocrine correlates of the breeding asynchrony between two corsican populations of blue tits (Parus caeruleus)
Caro, S. P.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Thomas, D. W. et al

in General and Comparative Endocrinology (2005), 140(1), 52-60

Analyses of the development of the reproductive system in seasonally breeding birds in the framework of long-term ecological studies are rare. Here, we present the first results of such a study in two ... [more ▼]

Analyses of the development of the reproductive system in seasonally breeding birds in the framework of long-term ecological studies are rare. Here, we present the first results of such a study in two Corsican populations of a European passerine bird, the blue tit (Parus caeruleus). The two study populations occupy different oak habitats and are separated by only 25 km. Despite their close proximity, they show a one-month difference in onset of egg laying, even after controlling for altitude. This micro-geographic difference in breeding date appears adaptive because both study populations raise chicks when food is most plentiful. In our study, males reached their maximum song activity during the egg-laying stage while maximal testosterone levels and testes sizes were reached 2-3 weeks before egg laying. The rate of development of the reproductive system in males was much faster in the earlier population, in spite of a similar onset of gonad development and song activity for the two study populations. No change in the volume of the song-control nuclei (HVC and RA) could be detected during the study period. Development of brain nuclei was completed 2-3 months before the beginning of intense sexual activity. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEndocrine disrupting effects of zearalenone, alpha- and beta-zearalenol at the level of nuclear receptor binding and steroidogenesis.
Frizzell, C; Ndossi, D; Verhaegen, S et al

in Toxicology Letters (2011), 206(2), 210-217

The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is a secondary metabolite of fungi which is produced by certain species of the genus Fusarium and can occur in cereals and other plant products. Reporter gene assays ... [more ▼]

The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is a secondary metabolite of fungi which is produced by certain species of the genus Fusarium and can occur in cereals and other plant products. Reporter gene assays incorporating natural steroid receptors and the H295R steroidogenesis assay have been implemented to assess the endocrine disrupting activity of ZEN and its metabolites alpha-zearalenol (alpha-ZOL) and beta-zearalenol (beta-ZOL). alpha-ZOL exhibited the strongest estrogenic potency (EC(50) 0.022+/-0.001 nM), slightly less potent than 17-beta estradiol (EC(50) 0.015+/-0.002 nM). ZEN was ~70 times less potent than alpha-ZOL and twice as potent as beta-ZOL. Binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of ZEN, alpha-ZOL or beta-ZOL. ZEN, alpha-ZOL or beta-ZOL increased production of progesterone, estradiol, testosterone and cortisol hormones in the H295R steroidogenesis assay, with peak productions at 10 muM. At 100 muM, cell viability decreased and levels of hormones were significantly reduced except for progesterone. beta-ZOL increased estradiol concentrations more than alpha-ZOL or ZEN, with a maximum effect at 10 muM, with beta-ZOL (562+/-59 pg/ml)>alpha-ZOL (494+/-60 pg/ml)>ZEN (375+/-43 pg/ml). The results indicate that ZEN and its metabolites can act as potential endocrine disruptors at the level of nuclear receptor signalling and by altering hormone production. [less ▲]

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See detailEndocrine disruption: it starts in the brain.
Parent, Anne-Simone ULg

Conference (2015)

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See detailEndocrine disruptors and breast cancer risk
Meurisse, M.; Plomteux, Guy ULg; Charlier, Corinne ULg et al

Poster (2000)

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See detailEndocrine disruptors in food: potential impact on human health
Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy ULg

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2007), 151(1), 44-54

Several scientific studies revealed that substances with hormonal (or antihormonal) activity are widely distributed in the environment as well as in food, either as natural constituents (as phytoestrogens ... [more ▼]

Several scientific studies revealed that substances with hormonal (or antihormonal) activity are widely distributed in the environment as well as in food, either as natural constituents (as phytoestrogens), or as substances of anthropogenic origin (for example, Several observations concerning both the wild fauna and humans indicate that these products with hormonal activity are endocrine disruptors. Numerous ecotoxicological studies evidenced important disturbances of the fertility of the wild fauna in zones contaminated by pesticides. In humans, epidemiological studies revealed a significant increase of certain cancers (among others, that of the testicles) and a decrease of the male fertility. Substances with estrogenic activity are often considered, but other hormonal effects are more and more frequently discovered (i.e. anti-androgenic). Numerous worries appear concerning the long-term effects on human health linked to a chronic exposure to these substances by food ingestion. It is urgent to review, not only on the actual contamination of our food by endocrine disruptors (in terms of identification and quantification of every individual chemical), but also the potentially toxic activity of food containing a mixture of contaminants present at levels below their individual toxicity threshold. [less ▲]

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See detailEndocrine Disruptors: A Most Relevant Issue for the Pediatric Endocrinologist.
BOURGUIGNON, Jean-Pierre ULg; Soder, Olle

in Hormone Research in Paediatrics (2013)

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See detailEndocrine disruptors: A relevant issue for neuroendocrinology also!
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Levine, Jon E.

in Frontiers in neuroendocrinology (2014), 35(1), 1

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See detailEndocrine effects of castration followed by androgen replacement and ACTH injections in the male domestic duck (Anas platyrhynchos L.).
Deviche, P.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Heyns, W. et al

in General and Comparative Endocrinology (1980), 41(1), 53-61

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See detailEndocrine factors and AMPKα1 are involved in the spread of hatch and subsequent neonatal performance of broiler chicks
Wang, Yufeng; Li, Yue; Willems, Els et al

Poster (2012)

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See detailEndocrine Incidentalomas : Pituitary
Beckers, Albert ULg

Scientific conference (2007, May)

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See detailThe endocrine milieu and CD4 T-lymphocyte polarization during pregnancy
Polese, Barbara ULg; Gridelet, Virginie ULg; Arakioti, Eleni et al

in Frontiers in Endocrinology (2014), 5(Article 106), 1-11

Acceptance of the fetal semi-allograft by the mother’s immune system has become the focus of intensive research. CD4+ T cells are important actors in the establishment of pregnancy. Th1/Th2 paradigm has ... [more ▼]

Acceptance of the fetal semi-allograft by the mother’s immune system has become the focus of intensive research. CD4+ T cells are important actors in the establishment of pregnancy. Th1/Th2 paradigm has been expanded to include CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Pregnancy hormones exert very significant modulatory properties on the maternal immune system. In this review, we describe mechanisms by which the endocrine milieu modulates CD4 T cell polarization during pregnancy. We first focused on Treg and Th17 cells and on their importance for pregnancy. Secondly, we review the effects of pregnancy hormones [progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2)] on immune cells previously described, with a particular attention to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The importance of Treg cells for pregnancy is evidenced. They are recruited before implantation and are essential for pregnancy maintenance. Decreased number or less efficient Treg cells are implicated in fertility disorders. As for Th17 cells, the few available studies suggest that they have a negative impact on fertility. Th17 frequency is increased in infertile patients. With the combination of its pro-effects on Th2 and Treg cells and anti-effects on Th1 and Th17 cells, P4 contributes to establishment of a favorable environment for pregnancy. E2 effects are more dependent on the context but it seems that E2 promotes Treg and Th2 cells while it inhibits Th1 cells. hCG positively influences activities of Treg and uterine natural killer cells. This embryo signal is an essential actor for the success of pregnancy, both as the endocrine factor regulating P4 secretion by the ovarian corpus luteum, but also as a paracrine agent during implantation as well as an angiogenic and immunologic mediator during the course of gestation. Luteinizing hormone (LH) immune properties begin to be studied but its positive impact on Treg cells suggests that LH could be a considerable immunomodulator in the mouse. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (6 ULg)