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See detailEffects of storage conditions on sprouting of microtubers of yam (Dioscorea cayenensis-D. rotundata complex).
Ondo Ovono, Paul ULg; Kevers, Claire ULg; Dommes, Jacques ULg

in Comptes Rendus des Séances de l'Académie des Sciences. Série III, Sciences de la Vie (2010)

The control of field tuber dormancy in yam (Dioscorea cayenensis- D.rotundata complex) is poorly understood. Although studies have examined single environmental factors and chemical treatments that might ... [more ▼]

The control of field tuber dormancy in yam (Dioscorea cayenensis- D.rotundata complex) is poorly understood. Although studies have examined single environmental factors and chemical treatments that might prolong tuber dormancy and storage, only a few were focused on further tuber sprouting. The present study concerns microtubers obtained by in vitro culture. When microtubers were harvested (after 9 months of culture) and directly transferred on a new medium without hormone, the tubers rapidly sprouted in in vitro conditions. No dormancy was observed in this case. Harvested microtubers were also stored dry in jars in sterile conditions during 2 to 18 weeks before in vitro sprouting. In this case, microtubers stored during 18 weeks sprouted more rapidly than those stored 8 weeks. A constant “dormancy-like period” (storage duration + sprouting delay) was observed, between 20 and 28 weeks respectively for the more rapid and the slower microtubers. The size of the tubers used for the storage had great influence on further sprouting. The larger they were, the better they sprouted. Light during storage had no effect on the sprouting delay while a temperature of 25 °C permit a quicker sprouting than 18 °C. The medium used to obtain microtubers could also have an effect on sprouting rate. Ex vitro sprouting was not a problem. There was a delay in sprouting in contrast to in vitro conditions but the rate of 100% was kept. This fact was very important for an agronomical application of this technique to the production of “seeds” directly usable in the field or after culture in greenhouse. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of stress on singing voice accuracy
Larrouy, Pauline ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg

in Journal of Voice (2014), 28(1), 52-58

Objective: The quality of a music performance can be lessened or enhanced if the performer experiences stressful conditions. In addition, the quality of a sung performance requires control of the ... [more ▼]

Objective: The quality of a music performance can be lessened or enhanced if the performer experiences stressful conditions. In addition, the quality of a sung performance requires control of the fundamental frequency of the voice, which is particularly sensitive to stress. The present study aimed to clarify the effects of stress on singing voice accuracy. Methods: Thirty-one music students were recorded in a stressful condition (i.e., a music examination) and a non-stressful condition. Two groups were defined according to the challenge level of the music examination (first and second music levels). Measurements were made by self-reported state anxiety (CSAI-2R questionnaire) and by observing heart rate activity (electrocardiogram) during each performance. In addition, the vocal accuracy of the sung performances was objectively analyzed. Results: As expected, state anxiety and heart rate were significantly higher on the day of the music examination than in the non-stressful condition for all the music students. However, the effect of stress was positive for the first-year students but negative for the second-year students, for whom the music examination was particularly challenging. In addition, highly significant correlations were found between the intensity of cognitive symptoms and the vocal accuracy criteria. Discussion: This study highlights the contrasting effects of stress on singing voice accuracy but also the need to consider the challenge level and perception of the symptoms in experimental and pedagogical settings. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Strontium ranelate on knee osteoarthritis pain : a responder analysis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Bellamy, N et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 110

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See detailEffects of strontium ranelate on radiographic spinal osteoarthritis progression
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delferriere, Danielle; Roux, Christian et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2007, September), 56(number 9 (suppl.)), 315

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See detailEffects of Strontium Ranelate on Spinal Osteoarthritis Progression
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delferriere, D.; Roux, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008), 67(3), 335-9

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 3-year treatment with strontium ranelate could delay the progression of spinal osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This study was a post-hoc analysis ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 3-year treatment with strontium ranelate could delay the progression of spinal osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This study was a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention (SOTI) and TReatment Of Peripheral OSteoporosis (TROPOS) trials performed on 1105 women with osteoporosis and concomitant radiological spinal OA at baseline, and for whom lumbar x-rays were available at baseline and over the 3-year treatment period. The presence and severity of osteophytes, disc space narrowing and sclerosis in the lumbar intervertebral spaces was graded according to a validated method, and an overall OA score was calculated for each intervertebral space. Back pain (measured on a five-point Likert scale only in SOTI) and health-related quality of life (SF-36 questionnaire) were assessed at baseline and after 3 years. Patients who suffered an incident or progressive vertebral fracture during the study were excluded from the analysis. RESULTS: The proportion of patients with worsening overall spinal OA score was reduced by 42% in the strontium ranelate group, compared with placebo (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.79; p = 0.0005). Significantly more patients in the strontium ranelate group experienced an improvement in back pain after 3 years, compared with placebo (p = 0.03), while no significant difference was observed in terms of health-related quality of life between these patient groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this post-hoc analysis suggest that strontium ranelate could reduce the progression of the radiographic features of spinal OA and back pain in women with osteoporosis and prevalent spinal OA. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of strontium ranelate on the risk of vertebral fracture in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis
Meunier, Pierre J.; Roux, Christian; Seeman, Ego et al

in New England Journal of Medicine (2004), 350(5), 459-468

BACKGROUND: Osteoporotic structural damage and bone fragility result from reduced bone formation and increased bone resorption. In a phase 2 clinical trial, strontium ranelate, an orally active drug that ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Osteoporotic structural damage and bone fragility result from reduced bone formation and increased bone resorption. In a phase 2 clinical trial, strontium ranelate, an orally active drug that dissociates bone remodeling by increasing bone formation and decreasing bone resorption, has been shown to reduce the risk of vertebral fractures and to increase bone mineral density. METHODS: To evaluate the efficacy of strontium ranelate in preventing vertebral fractures in a phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 1649 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (low bone mineral density) and at least one vertebral fracture to receive 2 g of oral strontium ranelate per day or placebo for three years. We gave calcium and vitamin D supplements to both groups before and during the study. Vertebral radiographs were obtained annually, and measurements of bone mineral density were performed every six months. RESULTS: New vertebral fractures occurred in fewer patients in the strontium ranelate group than in the placebo group, with a risk reduction of 49 percent in the first year of treatment and 41 percent during the three-year study period (relative risk, 0.59; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.48 to 0.73). Strontium ranelate increased bone mineral density at month 36 by 14.4 percent at the lumbar spine and 8.3 percent at the femoral neck (P<0.001 for both comparisons). There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis with strontium ranelate leads to early and sustained reductions in the risk of vertebral fractures. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Strychnopentamine on Cells Cultured in Vitro
Quetin-Leclercq, J.; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg et al

in Chemico-Biological Interactions (1991), 80(2), 203-16

This paper describes the powerful cytotoxic action exerted by strychnopentamine (SP), a dimeric indole alkaloid extracted from Strychnos usambarensis Gilg, on B16 melanoma cells and on non-cancer human ... [more ▼]

This paper describes the powerful cytotoxic action exerted by strychnopentamine (SP), a dimeric indole alkaloid extracted from Strychnos usambarensis Gilg, on B16 melanoma cells and on non-cancer human fibroblasts cultured in vitro. SP strongly inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell death at a relatively low concentration (less than 1 microgram/ml) after 72 h of treatment in the two lines. Incorporation of [3H]thymidine and [3H]leucine by B16 cells significantly decreases after only 1 h of treatment at 0.5 microgram/ml. SP induces the formation of dense lamellar bodies and vacuolization in the cytoplasm, intense blebbing at the cell surface and various cytological alterations leading to cell death. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Sublethal Cadmium Exposure on Antipredator Behavioural and Antitoxic Responses in the Invasive Amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus
Sornom, Pascal; Gismondi, Eric ULg; Vellinger, Céline et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(8)

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See detailEFFECTS OF SUBLIMINAL PRIMING ON NONCONSCIOUS GOAL PURSUIT AND EFFORT-RELATED CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSE
Capa, Rémi ULg; Cleeremans, Axel; Bustin, Gaëlle ULg et al

in Social Cognition (2011), 29(4), 430-444

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See detailEffects of sunshine/rain cycles on the behaviour of repairing systems
Courard, Luc ULg; Degeimbre, Robert ULg; Darimont, Anne ULg et al

in Ohama, Y.; Puterman, M. (Eds.) Adhesion between polymers and concrete (1999)

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See detailEffects of superthermal particles on waves in magnetized space plasmas
Hellberg, M.; Mace, R.; Cattaert, Tom ULg

in Space Science Reviews (2005), 121(1-4), 127-139

Distributions with excess numbers of superthermal particles are common in space environments. They are well modelled by the isotropic kappa distribution, or, where magnetic effects are important, the ... [more ▼]

Distributions with excess numbers of superthermal particles are common in space environments. They are well modelled by the isotropic kappa distribution, or, where magnetic effects are important, the kappa-Maxwellian. This paper presents a review of some studies of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in such plasmas, based on the associated generalized plasma dispersion functions, Z(kappa) and Z(kappa M). In particular, the effects of low values of kappa are considered, i.e. strongly accelerated distribution functions. Recently the full susceptibility tensor for oblique propagation of electromagnetic waves in a kappa-Maxwellian magnetoplasma has been established and has been applied to the study of whistler waves. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of surfactin on membrane models displaying lipid phase separation.
Deleu, Magali ULg; Lorent, Joseph; Lins, Laurence ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (2013), 1828(2), 801-815

Surfactin, a bacterial amphiphilic lipopeptide is attracting more and more attention in view of its bioactive properties which are in relation with its ability to interact with lipids of biological ... [more ▼]

Surfactin, a bacterial amphiphilic lipopeptide is attracting more and more attention in view of its bioactive properties which are in relation with its ability to interact with lipids of biological membranes. In this work, we investigated the effect of surfactin on membrane structure using model of membranes, vesicles as well as supported bilayers, presenting coexistence of fluid-disordered (DOPC) and gel (DPPC) phases. A range of complementary methods was used including AFM, ellipsometry, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence measurements of Laurdan, DPH, calcein release, and octadecylrhodamine B dequenching. Our findings demonstrated that surfactin concentration is critical for its effect on the membrane. The results suggest that the presence of rigid domains can play an essential role in the first step of surfactin insertion and that surfactin interacts both with the membrane polar heads and the acyl chain region. A mechanism for the surfactin lipid membrane interaction, consisting of three sequential structural and morphological changes, is proposed. At concentrations below the CMC, surfactin inserted at the boundary between gel and fluid lipid domains, inhibited phase separation and stiffened the bilayer without global morphological change of liposomes. At concentrations close to CMC, surfactin solubilized the fluid phospholipid phase and increased order in the remainder of the lipid bilayer. At higher surfactin concentrations, both the fluid and the rigid bilayer structures were dissolved into mixed micelles and other structures presenting a wide size distribution. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of surgery on ischaemic mitral regurgitation: a prospective multicentre registry (SIMRAM registry).
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Donal, Erwan; Cosyns, Bernard et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2008), 9(1), 26-30

AIMS: Functional ischaemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is common in patients with ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Although the presence of IMR negatively ... [more ▼]

AIMS: Functional ischaemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is common in patients with ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Although the presence of IMR negatively affects prognosis, the additional benefit of valve repair is debated, particularly with mild IMR at rest. Exercise echocardiography may help identify a subset of patients at higher risk of cardiovascular events by revealing the dynamic component of IMR. METHODS: A large prospective, multicentre, non-randomized registry is designed to evaluate the effects of surgery on IMR at rest and on its dynamic component at exercise (z). SIMRAM will enrol approximately 550 patients with IMR in up to 17 centres with clinical and exercise follow-up for 1 year. Three sets of outcomes will be prospectively assessed and several hypotheses will be tested including determinants of adverse outcome and progressive left ventricular remodeling, efficacy of treatment and role of ischaemia on the dynamic consequences of IMR. Enrolment began in November 2006 and is expected to end by early 2008. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of synthetic polycations on erythrocyte membrane analyzed by optical methods
Relancio, F; Riquelme, B; Dumas, D et al

Poster (2006, September 02)

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See detailEffects of synthetic tripeptide on the differentiation of dissociated cerebral hemisphere nerve cells in culture.
Sensenbrenner, M.; Jaros, G. G.; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Neurobiology (1975), 5(4), 207-213

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See detailEffects of systemic versus local gentamicin on the inner ear in the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua (L.), relevance for fish hearing investigations.
Faucher, Karine ULg; Aas-Hansen, Øyvind; Damsgard, B. et al

in Hearing Research (2008), 240(1-2), 12-21

Fish models are increasingly being used for hearing research investigations. Aminoglycoside antibiotics that are used for damaging the inner ear hair cells can have systemic side effects leading to death ... [more ▼]

Fish models are increasingly being used for hearing research investigations. Aminoglycoside antibiotics that are used for damaging the inner ear hair cells can have systemic side effects leading to death of study animals. This study aimed to compare two methods: (i) systemic (intravenous) and (ii) local (intrasaccular) gentamicin administration for induction of inner ear hair cell damage in the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua (L.). Hair cell damage was assessed using scanning electron microscopy; hair cell density, prevalence of immature hair cells and kinocilia length were measured. Gentamicin-treated fish were compared with control and sham fish. Intravenous gentamicin led to dose-dependent mortality caused by nephrotoxicity. The only visible effect after treatment was more immature hair cells and shorter kinocilia, the effect on hair cell density was equivocal. Following intrasaccular gentamicin treatment, fish mortality was negligible, and hair cells were damaged regardless of dose. Here, we observed decreased hair cell density, high prevalence of immature hair cells, and significantly shortened kinocilia. Conclusion: intrasaccular injection is preferable to intravenous injection of gentamicin for the study of ototoxicity in the Atlantic cod. [less ▲]

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