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See detailEffects of two PBDE congeners on the moulting enzymes of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex.
Gismondi, Eric ULg; Thomé, Jean-Pierre ULg

Poster (2014, May)

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) constitute a class of chemical compounds included to the composition of usual products such as plastics, textiles or electrical equipment, due to their flame ... [more ▼]

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) constitute a class of chemical compounds included to the composition of usual products such as plastics, textiles or electrical equipment, due to their flame retardants properties. Since 2004, PBDEs were banned in Europe and listed as Priority Substances within the European Union Water Frame Work Directive. Unfortunately, the release of PBDEs always occurs in ecosystems due to their presence in products currently in use and new products manufactured using recycled PBDE-containing material. However, only few studies have investigated their impacts on freshwater invertebrates. This work aimed to study the effects of BDE-47 and BDE-99 congeners on the chitobiase and chitinolytic enzymes activities of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex, according to gender, PBDE concentration and time of exposure. In addition, the bioaccumulation of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were measured. The results revealed that there was a dose-response relationship for the PBDE accumulation in G. pulex, whatever the gender and the PBDE congeners. Female G. pulex bioaccumulated more PBDE than males, and especially BDE-99 which was more accumulated than BDE-47. Moreover, PBDE exposures for 96hrs have caused the inhibition of chitobiase and chitinolytic enzymes activities. This study not only indicate the importance of taking into account various confounding factors (gender, congeners, concentration) to understand the PBDE effects, but underline also disruptions of enzymes activities involved in the molting process. These disturbances suggest effects on the gammarid development and reproduction, and consequently on the gammarid population. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of U-46619 on Pulmonary Hemodynamics before and after Administration of Bm-573, a Novel Thromboxane A2 Inhibitor
Lambermont, Bernard ULg; Kolh, Philippe ULg; Dogné, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Archives of Physiology & Biochemistry (2003), 111(3), 217-23

We studied the effects on pulmonary hemodynamics of U-46619, a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) agonist, before and after administration of a novel TXA2 receptor antagonist and synthase inhibitor (BM-573). Six ... [more ▼]

We studied the effects on pulmonary hemodynamics of U-46619, a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) agonist, before and after administration of a novel TXA2 receptor antagonist and synthase inhibitor (BM-573). Six anesthetized pigs (Ago group) received 6 consecutive injections of U-46619 at 30-min interval and were compared with six anesthetized pigs (Anta group) which received an increasing dosage regimen of BM-573 10 min before each U-46619 injection. Consecutive changes in pulmonary hemodynamics, including characteristic resistance, vascular compliance, and peripheral vascular resistance, were continuously assessed during the experimental protocol using a four-element Windkessel model. At 2 mg/kg, BM-573 completely blocked pulmonary hypertensive effects of U-46619 but pulmonary vascular compliance still decreased. This residual effect can probably be explained by a persistent increase in the tonus of the pulmonary vascular wall smooth muscles sufficient to decrease vascular compliance but not vessel lumen diameter. Such molecule could be a promising therapeutic approach in TXA2 mediated pulmonary hypertension as it is the case in pulmonary embolism, hyperacute lung rejection and endotoxinic shock. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Unfractionated and Fractionated Heparins on Myeloperoxidase Activity and Interactions with Endothelial Cells: Possible Effects on the Pathophysiology of Equine Laminitis
de la Rebière de Pouyade, Geoffroy ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg; Dupont, Ginette ULg et al

in Veterinary Journal (2007), 178(1), 62-69

As heparins are sometimes used to prevent equine laminitis, the interactions between equine neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO), unfractionated (UFH) and fractionated low molecular weight (LMWH) heparins and ... [more ▼]

As heparins are sometimes used to prevent equine laminitis, the interactions between equine neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO), unfractionated (UFH) and fractionated low molecular weight (LMWH) heparins and digital endothelium have been investigated. The effects of the heparins on purified equine MPO activity were tested by immunocapture followed by enzymatic detection. Endothelium-MPO interactions were assessed by measuring total and active MPO uptake by arterial and venous digital endothelial cells in culture with or without the addition of heparins. A dose-dependent MPO inhibition by UFH and LMWH was seen, with the greatest reduction in MPO activity noted with the highest concentration of LMWH. The MPO capture was greater in arterial cells, but heparins better inhibited MPO capture in venous cells. The activity of cell-bound MPO was almost completely suppressed by the heparins, and no differences were observed between UFH and LMWH. The results confirm the anti-inflammatory properties of heparins and allow a better understanding of the potential role of MPO in laminitis. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of vaccination with live or inactivated aqueous-suspension NDV vaccine in pigeons previously infected with paramyxovirus type 1
Duchatel, Jean-Pierre ULg

in Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift (1987), 56(2), 135-140

The authors compared the effects of vaccination of previously PMV1 infected pigeons, either with live-NDV-LaSota strain or with the inactivated aqueous-suspension vaccine (Colombovac PMV). Young ... [more ▼]

The authors compared the effects of vaccination of previously PMV1 infected pigeons, either with live-NDV-LaSota strain or with the inactivated aqueous-suspension vaccine (Colombovac PMV). Young susceptible pigeons were inoculated by intramuscular injectionwith pigeon PMV1 and vaccinated 4 days later ocularly/intranasally with live-LaSota strain or by subcutaneous injection of one 0.2 ml dose of Colombovac PMV. Cumulative nervous signs/mortality rates reached 95% in the live-LaSota vaccinated group, 70% in the control group and 60% in the Colombovac PMV vaccinated group. As compared to the control group, vaccination with Colombovac PMV had no beneficial but no disadvantageous effects on the disease while vaccination with live-LaSota significantly increased viral excretion in the faeces and number of pigeons with polyuria at the beginning of the clinical phase of infection. Consequently, percentages of pigeons having developed polyuria and cumulative percentages of nervous signs/mortality were significantly lower in the Colombovac PMV vaccinated group than in the live LaSota vaccinated group. In conclusion, when first symptoms are appearing in a PMV1 infected pigeon-house, vaccinated with Colombovac PMV may be attempted without heightening the disease while vaccination with live-Lasota increases the severity of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of vagal nerve stimulation in the rat orofacial formalin model of pain
Multon, S.; Scholsem, M.; Legrain, C. et al

Conference (2006, November 10)

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See detailEffects of vagal nerve stimulation in the rat orofacial formalin model of pain
Multon, Sylvie ULg; Scholsem, Martin; LEGRAIN, Caroline ULg et al

in Book of Abstracts of the 36th Annual Meeting Society for Neuroscience (Oct 2006) (2006, October)

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See detailEffects of vagal nerve stimulation in the rat orofacial formalin model of pain
Multon, Sylvie ULg; Scholsem, Martin; LEGRAIN, Caroline ULg et al

Poster (2006, November)

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See detailEffects of valve replacement for aortic stenosis on mitral regurgitation.
Unger, Philippe; Plein, Daniele; Van Camp, Guy et al

in American Journal of Cardiology (2008), 102(10), 1378-82

We aimed to prospectively and quantitatively assess the effects of aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS) on mitral regurgitation (MR) and to examine the determinants of the changes in MR ... [more ▼]

We aimed to prospectively and quantitatively assess the effects of aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS) on mitral regurgitation (MR) and to examine the determinants of the changes in MR. Fifty-two patients with AS scheduled for AVR were included if holosystolic MR not being considered for replacement or repair was detected. MR was quantified using the proximal isovelocity surface area method before and 8 +/- 4 days after surgery. Mitral valvular deformation parameters did not change significantly, but the mitral effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) and regurgitant volume decreased from 11 +/- 6 mm(2) to 8 +/- 6 mm(2) and from 20 +/- 10 ml to 11 +/- 9 ml, respectively (both p <0.0001). Using multiple linear regression analysis, preoperative severity of MR, mitral leaflet coaptation height, and end-diastolic volume decrease were independently associated with postoperative reduction in MR, whereas changes in mitral valve morphology after surgery were not. MR etiology did not predict the reduction in MR. In conclusion, the decrease in MR observed in most patients after AVR is associated with the magnitude of acute left ventricular reverse remodeling. As the reduction in left ventricular systolic pressure contributes to the decrease in regurgitant volume, the preoperative quantitative assessment of MR should best be performed by measurement of the ERO. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of various concentrations of glycolic acid at the corneoxenometry and collaxenometry bioassays.
Xhauflaire, Emmanuelle ULg; Pierard, Claudine ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology (2008), 7(3), 194-8

BACKGROUND: Glycolic acid is an alpha-hydroxy acid used as a chemical peeling for more than a quarter century. The primary tissue target is the stratum corneum. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Glycolic acid is an alpha-hydroxy acid used as a chemical peeling for more than a quarter century. The primary tissue target is the stratum corneum. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the effects of various concentrations of glycolic acid on the stratum corneum and collagen fibers using two selected bioassays. METHODS: Corneoxenometry was performed to test the effects on human stratum corneum. Collaxenometry was similarly designed to quantify the effect on sheets of collagen fibers. Different glycolic acid concentrations ranging from 5% to 70% in alcohol were tested, respectively, for 3- and 10-min exposure times. RESULTS: Both bioassays showed consistent reactivities with a dose-effect relationship when using a 3-min exposure time. By contrast, the tests appeared unreliable or uninformative for the 10-min exposure time. CONCLUSION: Corneoxenometry and collaxenometry appear useful for in vitro testing peeling agents during short exposure times. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of varying antigens and adjuvant systems on the immunogenicity and safety of investigational tetravalent human oncogenic papillomavirus vaccines: Results from two randomized trials.
Van Damme, Pierre; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Simon, Philippe et al

in Vaccine (2014)

BACKGROUND: A prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine targeting oncogenic HPV types in addition to HPV-16 and -18 may broaden protection against cervical cancer. Two Phase I/II, randomized ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: A prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine targeting oncogenic HPV types in addition to HPV-16 and -18 may broaden protection against cervical cancer. Two Phase I/II, randomized, controlled studies were conducted to compare the immunogenicity and safety of investigational tetravalent HPV L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines, containing VLPs from two additional oncogenic genotypes, with the licensed HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (control) in healthy 18-25 year-old women. METHODS: In one trial (NCT00231413), subjects received control or one of 6 tetravalent HPV-16/18/31/45 AS04 vaccine formulations at months (M) 0,1,6. In a second trial (NCT00478621), subjects received control or one of 5 tetravalent HPV-16/18/33/58 vaccines formulated with different adjuvant systems (AS04, AS01 or AS02), administered on different schedules (M0,1,6 or M0,3 or M0,6). RESULTS: One month after the third injection (Month 7), there was a consistent trend for lower anti-HPV-16 and -18 geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) for tetravalent AS04-adjuvanted vaccines compared with control. GMTs were statistically significantly lower for an HPV-16/18/31/45 AS04 vaccine containing 20/20/10/10mug VLPs for both anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 antibodies, and for an HPV-16/18/33/58 AS04 vaccine containing 20/20/20/20mug VLPs for anti-HPV-16 antibodies. There was also a trend for lower HPV-16 and -18-specific memory B-cell responses for tetravalent AS04 vaccines versus control. No such trends were observed for CD4+ T-cell responses. Immune interference could not always be overcome by increasing the dose of HPV-16/18 L1 VLPs or by using a different adjuvant system. All formulations had acceptable reactogenicity and safety profiles. Reactogenicity in the 7-day post-vaccination period tended to increase with the introduction of additional VLPs, especially for formulations containing AS01. CONCLUSIONS: HPV-16 and -18 antibody responses were lower when additional HPV L1 VLPs were added to the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine. Immune interference is a complex phenomenon that cannot always be overcome by changing the antigen dose or adjuvant system. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.
Sava, Simona L.; de Pasqua, Victor; MAGIS, Delphine ULg et al

in PloS one (2014), 9(6), 100198

Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not ... [more ▼]

Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc gluconate, and selenomethionine supplementation on muscle function and oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.
Passerieux, Emilie; Hayot, Maurice; Jaussent, Audrey et al

in Free radical biology & medicine (2015), 81

Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of specific skeletal muscles. As growing evidence suggests that oxidative ... [more ▼]

Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of specific skeletal muscles. As growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress may contribute to FSHD pathology, antioxidants that might modulate or delay oxidative insults could help in maintaining FSHD muscle function. Our primary objective was to test whether oral administration of vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc gluconate, and selenomethionine could improve the physical performance of patients with FSHD. Adult patients with FSHD (n=53) were enrolled at Montpellier University Hospital (France) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg vitamin C, 400mg vitamin E, 25mg zinc gluconate and 200 mug selenomethionine (n=26), or matching placebo (n=27) once a day for 17 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes in the two-minute walking test (2-MWT), maximal voluntary contraction, and endurance limit time of the dominant and nondominant quadriceps (MVCQD, MVCQND, TlimQD, and TlimQND, respectively) after 17 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes were changes in the antioxidant status and oxidative stress markers. Although 2-MWT, MVCQ, and TlimQ were all significantly improved in the supplemented group at the end of the treatment compared to baseline, only MVCQ and TlimQ variations were significantly different between groups (MVCQD: P=0.011; MVCQND: P=0.004; TlimQD: P=0.028; TlimQND: P=0.011). Similarly, the vitamin C (P<0.001), vitamin E as alpha-tocopherol (P<0.001), vitamin C/vitamin E ratio (P=0.017), vitamin E gamma/alpha ratio (P=0.022) and lipid peroxides (P<0.001) variations were significantly different between groups. In conclusion, vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc, and selenium supplementation has no significant effect on the 2-MWT, but improves MVCQ and TlimQ of both quadriceps by enhancing the antioxidant defenses and reducing oxidative stress. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (number: NCT01596803). [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of vitamin D in the elderly population : current status and perspectives
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; Souberbielle, JC et al

in Archives of Public Health (2014), 72

Besides its well-known effect on bone metabolism, recent researches suggest that vitamin D may also play a role in the muscular, immune, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Double-blind RCTs support ... [more ▼]

Besides its well-known effect on bone metabolism, recent researches suggest that vitamin D may also play a role in the muscular, immune, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Double-blind RCTs support vitamin D supplementation at a dose of 800 IU per day for the prevention of falls and fractures in the senior population. Ecological, case–control and cohort studies have suggested that high vitamin D levels were associated with a reduced risk of autoimmune diseases, type 2 diabetes, cardio-vascular diseases and cancer but large clinical trials are lacking today to provide solid evidence of a vitamin D benefit beyond bone health. At last, the optimal dose, route of administration, dosing interval and duration of vitamin D supplementation at a specific target dose beyond the prevention of vitamin D deficiency need to be further investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of vitamin D on skeletal muscle strength, muscle mass and muscle power: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg et al

in The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism (2014), 99(11), 4336-4345

Context There is growing evidence that vitamin D plays a role on several tissues including skeletal muscle. Objective To summarize with a meta-analyse the effects of vitamin D supplementation on muscle ... [more ▼]

Context There is growing evidence that vitamin D plays a role on several tissues including skeletal muscle. Objective To summarize with a meta-analyse the effects of vitamin D supplementation on muscle function. Data sources A systematic research of randomized controlled trials, performed between 1966 and January 2014 has been conducted on Medline, Cochrane Database of Systematics Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled and completed by a manual review of the literature and congressional abstracts. Study selection All forms and doses of vitamin D supplementation, with or without calcium supplementation, compared with placebo or control were included. Out of the 225 potentially relevant articles, 30 randomized controlled trials involving 5615 individuals (mean age: 61.1 years) met the inclusion criteria. Data extraction Data were extracted by two independent reviewers. Data synthesis Results revealed a small but significant positive effect of vitamin D supplementation on global muscle strength with a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.17 (p=0.02). No significant effect was found on muscle mass (SMD 0.058; p=0.52) or muscle power (SMD 0.057; p=0.657). Results on muscle strength were significantly more important with people who presented a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level <30 nmol/L. Supplementation seems also more effective on people aged 65 years or older compared to younger subjects (SMD 0.25; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.48 versus SMD 0.03; 95% CI -0.08 to 0.14). Conclusions Vitamin D supplementation has a small positive impact on muscle strength but additional studies are needed to define optimal treatment modalities, including dose, mode of administration and duration. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of wheat-pea intercropping on the population dynamics of Sitobion avenae (Homoptera: Aphididae) and its main natural enemies
Zhou, Haibo ULg

in Kun Chong Xue Bao = Acta Entomologica Sinica (2009), 52(7), 775-782

To study the ecological regulation effects of species diversity in wheat fields on Sitobion avenae, field experiments were carried out in Langfang Experimental Station of Institute of Plant Protection ... [more ▼]

To study the ecological regulation effects of species diversity in wheat fields on Sitobion avenae, field experiments were carried out in Langfang Experimental Station of Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences from October of 2007 to July of 2008. The intercropping patterns of wheat and pea, by the proportion of planting row of pea and wheat in 2:2, 2:4, 2:6 and 2:8, were plotted, and the field cultivar monoculture of wheat was planted as the control. Population dynamics of apterae and alatae S. avenae, population dynamics, species richness, diversity index and evenness of main natural enemies were investigated systematically and analyzed. The results showed that, compared with monoculture of wheat, the amount of S. avenae apterae per 100 plants (square-root transformed) in aphid peak period were very significantly lower in the intercropping treatments (P<0.01), and the cascade was that wheat monoculture (77.38) > 2-2 intercropping (68.62) > 2-4 intercropping (68.51) > 2-8 intercropping (65.19) > 2-6 intercropping (64.94). Although population dynamics of main natural enemies showed a similar trend with time, wheat-pea intercropping could preserve and augment natural enemies more than monoculture of wheat, and there were higher population densities of ladybeetles and aphid parasitoids, and higher species richness and diversity index of natural enemies, but lower evenness index in each intercropping field. It is so concluded that wheat-pea intercropping system can not only reduce the population of S. avenae, but also improve the stability and sustainability of controlling wheat pests. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of wheat/oilseed rape and wheat/pea associations on the diversity of aphids and aphidophagous beneficials
Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas ULg; Bosquée, Emilie ULg; Honba, David et al

Poster (2014, May 20)

This study was conducted in the Shandong province (China) to better characterize the effect of wheat/oilseed rape and wheat/pea associations on the populations of aphids and aphidophagous beneficials. At ... [more ▼]

This study was conducted in the Shandong province (China) to better characterize the effect of wheat/oilseed rape and wheat/pea associations on the populations of aphids and aphidophagous beneficials. At specific times of the season, the observations on wheat tillers confirm the resource concentration and the enemy hypotheses. In fact, aphids were more abundant in the pure stand of wheat, while more ladybirds were observed in the associations. As for the trapping of aphidophagous beneficials, the parasitoid species Aphidius gifuensis (Ashmead) was prevalent. Among predators, Propylea japonica (Thunberg) and Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) were the most abundant species. Few lacewings and hoverflies were trapped. This study shows a beneficial effect of crop associations on the control of aphid populations. [less ▲]

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