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See detailDiscutant de la Session Mainstreaming Migrant Integration Policies
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Scientific conference (2014, August 27)

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See detailDiscutant lors du Workshop COST A2 “la forteresse européenne”
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Scientific conference (1995, March 10)

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See detailDiscutant, Séminaire du programme thématique « Migrations et Diversité Culturelle »
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Scientific conference (2008, April 03)

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See detaildiscutante de 5 présentations
Gavray, Claire ULg

Scientific conference (2016, November 07)

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See detaildiscutante de la session 'Men's wellbeing I'
Gavray, Claire ULg

Scientific conference (2016, November 09)

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See detailDiscutante du panel 'cohésion sociale et participation sociale'
Gavray, Claire ULg

Conference (2016, November 17)

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See detailDisease characteristics of patients with X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome
Daly, Adrian ULg; Lodish, MB; Trivellin, G et al

in Abstract book - ENDO 2015 (2015, March)

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See detailDisease management patterns for postmenopausal women in Europe with hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative advanced breast cancer.
Andre, Fabrice; Neven, Patrick; Marinsek, Nina et al

in Current medical research and opinion (2014)

Abstract Background: International guidelines for hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer (BC) recommend sequential lines of ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: International guidelines for hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer (BC) recommend sequential lines of hormonal therapy (HT), and only recommend chemotherapy for patients with extensive visceral involvement or rapidly progressive disease. This study evaluated actual physician-reported treatments for advanced BC in Europe. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 355 postmenopausal women with HR+, HER2- advanced BC who progressed on >/=1 line of HT (adjuvant or advanced) and completed >/=1 line of chemotherapy (advanced). Treatment choice was evaluated for each line of therapy. Results: Of 355 patients, 111 (31%) received first-line chemotherapy, whereas 218 (61%) and 26 (7%) switched from HT to chemotherapy in second and third line, respectively. More patients receiving first-line HT had bone metastases (73% vs 27% chemotherapy). Patients treated with first-line chemotherapy had more brain (12% vs 3% HT) or extensive liver (13% vs 6% HT) metastases. Subgroup analysis of 188 patients who received first-line HT and had de novo advanced BC or relapsed/recurrent disease more than 1 year after adjuvant therapy found that the majority (89%; n = 167) of these patients switched to chemotherapy in second line. However, among these 167 patients, 27% had no significant changes in metastases between first and second line. Among the 73% of patients who had significant changes in metastases, 20% had no brain metastases or extensive visceral disease. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the guideline-recommended use of multiple HT lines is open to interpretation and that optimal treatment for European postmenopausal women with HR+, HER2- advanced BC who responded to HT may not be achieved. [less ▲]

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See detailDisease Modifying drugs for OA: from research to clinical evidences
Henrotin, Yves ULg

Conference (2014, April 24)

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See detailDisease severity assessment in epidemiological studies: accuracy and reliability of visual estimates of Septoria leaf blotch (SLB) in winter wheat.
El Jarroudi, Moussa ULg; Kouadio, Louis; Mackels, Christophe et al

in Phytopathology (2014), 104(11), 37

The accuracy and reliability of visual assessments of SLB severity by raters (i.e. one plant pathologist with extensive experience and three other raters trained prior to field observations using standard ... [more ▼]

The accuracy and reliability of visual assessments of SLB severity by raters (i.e. one plant pathologist with extensive experience and three other raters trained prior to field observations using standard area diagrams and DISTRAIN) was determined by comparison with assumed actual values obtained by digital image analysis. Initially analyses were performed using SLB severity over the full 0-100% range; then, to explore error over short ranges of the 0-100% scale, the scale was divided into sequential 10%-increments based on the actual values. Lin’s concordance correlation (LCC) analysis demonstrated that all raters were accurate when compared over the whole severity range (LCC coefficient (ρc)= 0.92-0.99). However, agreement between actual and visual SLB severities was less good when compared over the short intervals of the 10×10% classes (ρc= -0.12-0.99), demonstrating that agreement will vary depending on the actual disease range over which it is compared. Inter-rater reliability between each pair of raters over the full 0-100% range (correlation analysis r= 0.970-0.992, P<0.0001), and inter-class correlation coefficient (ρ≥ 0.927) were very high. This study provides new insight into using a full range of actual disease severity vs limited ranges to ensure a realistic measure of rater accuracy and reliability, in addition to contributing to the ongoing debate on the use of visual disease estimates based on the 0-100% ratio scale for epidemiological research. [less ▲]

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See detailDisease Severity Estimates – Effects of Rater Accuracy and Assessment Methods for Comparing Treatments
Bock, Clive; El Jarroudi, Moussa ULg; Kouadio, Louis et al

in Plant Disease (2015), 99(1104-1112),

Assessment of disease severity is required for several purposes in plant pathology; most often the estimates are made visually. It is established that visual estimates can be inaccurate and unreliable ... [more ▼]

Assessment of disease severity is required for several purposes in plant pathology; most often the estimates are made visually. It is established that visual estimates can be inaccurate and unreliable. The ramifications of biased or imprecise estimates by raters have not been fully explored using empirical data; partly because of the logistical difficulties involved in different raters assessing the same leaves for which actual disease has been measured in a replicated experiment with multiple treatments. In this study nearest percent estimates (NPEs) of Septoria leaf blotch (SLB) on leaves of winter wheat from non-treated and fungicide treated plots were assessed in both 2006 and 2007 by four raters and compared to assumed true values measured using image analysis. Lin’s concordance correlation (LCC, ρc) was used to assess agreement between the two approaches. NPEs were converted to Horsfall-Barratt (HB) mid-points and again compared for agreement with true values. The estimates of SLB severity from fungicide-treated and non-treated plots were analyzed using generalized linear mixed modeling to ascertain effects of rater using both the NPE and HB values. Rater 1 showed good agreement with image analysis (ρc = 0.986 to 0.999), while raters 3 and 4 had less good agreement (ρc = 0.205 to 0.936). Conversion to the HB scale had little effect on bias or accuracy, but reduced both precision and agreement for most raters on most assessment dates (precision, r = -0.001 to -0.132; and agreement, ρc = -0.003 to -0.468). Inter-rater reliability was also reduced slightly by conversion of estimates to HB midpoint values. Estimates of mean SLB severity were significantly different between image analysis and raters 2, 3 and 4, and there were frequently significant differences among raters (F=151 to 1260, P=0.001 to <0.0001). Conversion to the HB scale changed the means separation ranking of rater estimates on 26 June 2007. Nonetheless, image analysis and all raters were able to differentiate control and treated plots treatments (F=116 to 1952, P=0.002 to <0.0001, depending on date and rater). Conversion of NPEs to the HB scale tended to reduce F-values slightly (2006: NPEs, F=116 to 276, P=0.002 to 0.0005, and for the HB converted values F=101 to 270, P=0.002 to 0.0005, and in 2007, NPEs, F=164 to 1952 P=0.001 to <0.0001, and for HB converted values F=126 to 1633 P=0.002 to <0.0001). The results demonstrated the need for accurate and reliable disease assessment to minimize over or underestimates compared to actual disease, and where multiple raters are deployed, they should be assigned in a manner to reduce any potential effect of rater differences on the analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailDisease-related amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme trigger the unfolded protein response and disturb eye development in Drosophila melanogaster
Kumita, Janet R.; Helmfors, Linda; Williams, Jocy et al

in FASEB Journal (2012)

We have created a Drosophila model of lysozyme amyloidosis to investigate the in vivo behavior of disease-associated variants. To achieve this objective, wild-type (WT) protein and the amyloidogenic ... [more ▼]

We have created a Drosophila model of lysozyme amyloidosis to investigate the in vivo behavior of disease-associated variants. To achieve this objective, wild-type (WT) protein and the amyloidogenic variants F57I and D67H were expressed in Drosophila melanogaster using the UAS-gal4 system and both the ubiquitous and retinal expression drivers Act5C-gal4 and gmr-gal4. The nontransgenic w(1118) Drosophila line was used as a control throughout. We utilized ELISA experiments to probe lysozyme protein levels, scanning electron microscopy for eye phenotype classification, and immunohistochemistry to detect the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation. We observed that expressing the destabilized F57I and D67H lysozymes triggers UPR activation, resulting in degradation of these variants, whereas the WT lysozyme is secreted into the fly hemolymph. Indeed, the level of WT was up to 17 times more abundant than the variant proteins. In addition, the F57I variant gave rise to a significant disruption of the eye development, and this correlated to pronounced UPR activation. These results support the concept that the onset of familial amyloid disease is linked to an inability of the UPR to degrade completely the amyloidogenic lysozymes prior to secretion, resulting in secretion of these destabilized variants, thereby leading to deposition and associated organ damage.-Kumita, J. R., Helmfors, L., Williams, J., Luheshi, L. M., Menzer, L., Dumoulin, M., Lomas, D. A., Crowther, D. C., Dobson, C. M., Brorsson, A.-C. Disease-related amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme trigger the unfolded protein response and disturb eye development in Drosophila melanogaster. [less ▲]

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See detailDiseases of pigeons
Marlier, Didier ULg; Vindevogel, Henri ULg

in Brugère-Picoux, Jeanne; Vaillancourt, Jean-Pierre; Bouzouaia, Moncef (Eds.) et al Manual of Poultry Diseases (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULg)