Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
See detailEpidemiology and genetics of pituitary tumours
Beckers, Albert ULg

in Chanson, Philippe (Ed.) Best Practice Research - Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe epidemiology and management of pituitary incidentalomas
Daly, Adrian ULg; Burlacu, M. C.; Livadariu, E. et al

in Hormone Research (2007), 68(Suppl. 5), 195-198

Prevalence: The prevalence of pituitary tumors has been a topic of controversy for many years. Autopsy and radiological series show that pituitary incidentalomas may be present in one of six people ... [more ▼]

Prevalence: The prevalence of pituitary tumors has been a topic of controversy for many years. Autopsy and radiological series show that pituitary incidentalomas may be present in one of six people. Recent epidemiological data suggest that clinically apparent pituitary adenomas have a prevalence of approximately one in 1,000 people in the general population. The disconnect between these two prevalence rates underlines the common clinical quandary of how to manage pituitary incidentalomas, particularly those lacking clinical signs/symptoms or hormonal abnormalities. Management: The natural history of incidentalomas suggests that periodic hormonal, clinical and radiological follow-up is the optimal approach. In the absence of tumor growth or relevant symptoms, screening can be continued intermittently or curtailed based on the clinical judgment of the physician. In the presence of hormonal hypersecretion, the management of pituitary incidentalomas, whether they are micro- or macroadenomas, should follow accepted clinical guidelines. For incidental pituitary macroadenomas without hormonal hypersecretion, clinical management should also include assessments for visual field impairment or hypopituitarism. In such cases, regular radiological and hormonal follow-up is required to identify tumor growth or the appearance of new symptoms. In the presence of tumor growth or new hormonal abnormalities, surgical options should be considered and discussed with the patient. Copyright (C) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology and outcome of acute lung injury in European intensive care units. Results from the ALIVE study
Brun-Buisson, Christian; Minelli, Cosetta; Bertolini, Guido et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2004), 30(1), 51-61

Abstract Objectives: To re-examine the epidemiology of acute lung injury (ALI) in European intensive care units (ICUs). Design and setting: A 2-month inception cohort study in 78 ICUs of 10 European ... [more ▼]

Abstract Objectives: To re-examine the epidemiology of acute lung injury (ALI) in European intensive care units (ICUs). Design and setting: A 2-month inception cohort study in 78 ICUs of 10 European countries. Patients: All patients admitted for more than 4 h were screened for ALI and followed up to 2 months. Measurements and main results: Acute lung injury occurred in 463 (7.1%) of 6,522 admissions and 16.1% of all mechanically ventilated patients; 65.4% cases occurred on ICU admission. Among 136 patients initially presenting with “mild ALI” (200< PaO2/FiO2 £300), 74 (55%) evolved to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 3 days. Sixty-two patients (13.4%) remained with mild ALI and 401 had ARDS. The crude ICU and hospital mortalities were 22.6% and 32.7% (p<0.001), and 49.4% and 57.9% (p=0.0005), respectively, for mild ALI and ARDS. ARDS patients initially received a mean tidal volume of 8.3±1.9 ml/kg and a mean PEEP of 7.7±3.6 cmH2O; air leaks occurred in 15.9%. After multivariate analysis, mortality was associated with age (odds ratio (OR) =1.2 per 10 years; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–1.36), immuno-incompetence (OR: 2.88; Cl: 1.57–5.28), the severity scores SAPS II (OR: 1.16 per 10% expected mortality; Cl: 1.02–1.31) and logistic organ dysfunction (OR: 1.25 per point; Cl: 1.13–1.37), a pH less than 7.30 (OR: 1.88; Cl: 1.11–3.18) and early air leak (OR: 3.16; Cl: 1.59–6.28). Conclusions: Acute lung injury was frequent in our sample of European ICUs (7.1%); one third of patients presented with mild ALI, but more than half rapidly evolved to ARDS. While the mortality of ARDS remains high, that of mild ALI is twice as low, confirming the grading of severity between the two forms of the syndrome. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
See detailThe Epidemiology of Acromegaly
Beckers, Albert ULg; Daly, Adrian ULg

in John Wass (Ed.) Acromegaly book (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEpidemiology of atypical myopathy: descriptive phase
Votion, Dominique ULg; Linden, Annick ULg; Desmecht, Daniel ULg et al

in In Proceeding: First Scientific Symposium of the European College of Equine Internal Medicine (ECEIM) (2005, January)

Atypical myopathy (AM) in grazing horses is a frequently fatal condition that has been reported in several European countries. In Belgium, since autumn 2000, AM was confirmed in 39 equids based on ... [more ▼]

Atypical myopathy (AM) in grazing horses is a frequently fatal condition that has been reported in several European countries. In Belgium, since autumn 2000, AM was confirmed in 39 equids based on characteristic histological lesions in postural and respiratory muscles. This study describes the history, clinical signs and biochemical changes associated with AM in these confirmed cases. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe epidemiology of canine and feline obesity
Diez, Marianne ULg; Nguyen, Patrick

in Waltham Focus Dog and cat obesity (2006), 1

Detailed reference viewed: 250 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases in the elderly in the province of Liege - A three-year prospective study
Piront, Patricia ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg; Latour, Pascale ULg et al

in Gastroentérologie Clinique et Biologique (2002), 26(2), 157-161

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of injuries in high-level youth sport in Luxembourg [Abstract]
Frisch, Anne ULg; Theisen, Daniel; Urhausen, Axel et al

in Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy (2008), 16

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of insulin resistance and hypertension in adults - MONICA BELLUX- preliminary results.
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; Beck, Dominique; Lefèbvre, Pierre ULg et al

in Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology Newsletter, Amercian Heart Association (1994), 49

Numerous publications have outlined that insulin resistance, hypertension and obesity are often associated suggesting a common link in the pathogenic mechanisms.

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of lesions in high-level competition judo
Zinzen, E.; Vanbergen, Johanne; Clarijs, Jan Pieter et al

in Abstract Book of the 9th Annual Congress of the European College of Sports Science (2004, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of major depression in Belgian parkinsonian patients
Vanderheyden, Jean-Emile; GONCE, Michel ULg; BOURGEOIS, Philip et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2010), 110

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of mastitis in 30 walloon dairy farms using a compilation of clinical and subclinical data in a new tool for Udder health assessment
Theron, Léonard ULg; Reding, Edouard; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 6th European congress of Bovine health management (2011, September)

Bovine mastitis has been assessed through somatic cells or clinical cases by farmers and vets but most of the time the perfect combination of both data remains unavailable. We tried to implement a new ... [more ▼]

Bovine mastitis has been assessed through somatic cells or clinical cases by farmers and vets but most of the time the perfect combination of both data remains unavailable. We tried to implement a new strategy of identification of mastitis-related costs, epidemiological impact and key periods of management. We built an online system for clinical data capture, including facilities for administrative management of veterinary drugs. Herd prevalence rate (HPR) is assessed through clinical and subclinical data. Lactation incidence rate (NIR) and cure rate (CR) were calculated for the period (depending on type of DHI control) using subclinical thresholds (primiparous > 150.000 cells/ml and multiparous >250.000 cells/ml) and clinical cases in susceptible animals (healthy or diseased). Dry-off period is studied through the Dry-off cure rate (DOCR) and new infection rate at first control (NIFC). The average number of cow-day-at-risk was 73.6 (StD=34.80). Mean HPR was 33 % (StD =11%); the average NIR was 16% and CR 35%. Mean DOCR was 62% with an NIFC of 23%. Regarding a mean loss for mastitis of 71€ per cow-year, the average difference was +40.7€ (StD=66.7€). It is explained partly by DOCR (R²=0.20; β=-131; p<0.0001). NIR is mainly influenced by HPR, but mainly by primiparous infection rate (R²=0.36; β= 0.33; p<0.0001). Those figures are coherent with subclinical data indicating that multiparous cows are becoming more and more infected, limiting efficacy of dry-off therapy. Communication has to be done around dry-off and preventive measures in primiparous cows. As CR had few significant impact on global udder health, cure at the herd level should more be regarded as cow ability to cure in its environment than by considerations on medication once infected. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of onychomycoses assessed by histomycology in psoriatic patients
Pierard-Franchimont, Claudine ULg; Arrese, J. E.; Hermanns-Le, Trinh ULg et al

in Journal de Mycologie Medicale (2006), 16(3), 159-162

Onychomycosis is a common condition in the adult population. It has been reported to be more prevalent in association with some specific diseases including psoriasis. This study using combined ... [more ▼]

Onychomycosis is a common condition in the adult population. It has been reported to be more prevalent in association with some specific diseases including psoriasis. This study using combined histomycology and cultures was performed on nail clippings collected from thickened dystrophic toenails in 233 eligible psoriatic patients. Onychopathies associated with psoriasis were more numerous in men. Their prevalence increased up to the age of 40 and remained stable thereafter. A total of 42/233 cases were diagnosed as onychomycoses. These infections were more prevalent in middle-aged men. The identified infectious agents (35/42 cases) frequently corresponded to dermatophytes, but Candida albicans was also implicated, particularly in women. (c) 2006 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics (1991), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEpidemiology of pestivirus infection in wild ungulates of the French South Alps
Martin, C.; Letellier, C.; Caij, B. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 147(3-4), 320-328

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (18 ULg)
See detailThe Epidemiology of pituitary tumors : Results of an international collaborative study
Daly, Adrian ULg; Cogne, M.; Jaffrain-Réa, M. L. et al

in The Endocrine Society's - 89 Annual Meeting : Toronto, Canada, 2-5 june 2007 (2007, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULg)
See detailEpidemiology of Prolactinomas
Beckers, Albert ULg; Vandeva, S.

in American Pediatric (2009, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Epidemiology of Prolactinomas
Ciccarelli, A.; Daly, Adrian ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

in Pituitary (2005), 8(1), 3-6

Prolactin-secreting tumors (prolactinomas), the most frequently occurring pituitary tumor, have a frequency that varies with age and sex. They occur most frequently in females aged 20 to 50 years old, at ... [more ▼]

Prolactin-secreting tumors (prolactinomas), the most frequently occurring pituitary tumor, have a frequency that varies with age and sex. They occur most frequently in females aged 20 to 50 years old, at which time the female-to-male ratio is approximately 10:1. In the pediatric-adolescent age group, prolactinomas have a prevalence of 100/million population, and account for less than 2% of all intracranial tumors. Prolactinomas occur in approximately 30% of patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and in this setting, they may be more aggressive than their sporadic counterparts. Patients with Carney complex or McCune-Albright syndrome may exhibit hyperprolactinemia due to a pituitary tumor derived from somatomammotropic cells that secrete both growth hormone and prolactin. Few familial cases of prolactinoma unrelated to MEN-1 are reported in literature. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
See detailEpidemiology of Q fever in animals and humans in the 21st century
Mainil, Jacques ULg; Porter, S.; Czaplicky, G. et al

Conference (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)