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See detailEstimation of additive and dominance genetic variances with Method R
Druet, Tom ULg

Doctoral thesis (2002)

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See detailEstimation of additive and nonadditive genetic variances in Hereford, Gelbvieh, and Charolais by Method R.
Duangjinda, M.; Bertrand, K.; Misztal, I. et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2001), 79(12), 2997-3001

Parameters for direct and maternal dominance were estimated in models that included non-additive genetic effects. The analyses used weaning weight records adjusted for age of dam from populations of ... [more ▼]

Parameters for direct and maternal dominance were estimated in models that included non-additive genetic effects. The analyses used weaning weight records adjusted for age of dam from populations of Canadian Hereford (n = 467,814), American Gelbvieh (n = 501,552), and American Charolais (n = 314,552). Method R estimates of direct additive genetic, maternal additive genetic, permanent maternal environment, direct dominance, and maternal dominance variances as a proportion of the total variance were 23, 12, 13, 19, and 14% in Hereford; 27, 7, 10, 18, and 2% in Gelbvieh; and 34, 15, 15, 23, and 2% in Charolais. The correlations between direct and maternal additive genetic effects were -0.30, -0.23, and -0.47 in Hereford, Gelbvieh, and Charolais, respectively. The correlations between direct and maternal dominance were -0.38, -0.02, and -0.04 in Hereford, Gelbvieh, and Charolais, respectively. Estimates of inbreeding depression were -0.20, -0.18, and -0.13 kg per 1% of inbreeding for Hereford, Gelbvieh, and Charolais, respectively. Estimates of the maternal inbreeding depression were -0.01, -0.02, and -0.02 kg, respectively. The high ratio of direct dominance to additive genetic variances provided some evidence that direct dominance effects should be considered in beef cattle evaluation. However, maternal dominance effects seemed to be important only for Hereford cattle. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of air quality degradation due to Saharan dust at Nouakchott, Mauritania, from horizontal visibility data
Ozer, Pierre ULg; Laghdaf, MBOM; Lemine, S. O. M. et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2007), 178(1-4), 79-87

It is now irrefutable that air pollution caused by large amounts of Total Suspended Particulates (TSP) and respiratory particulates or Particulate Matter less than 10 mu m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10 ... [more ▼]

It is now irrefutable that air pollution caused by large amounts of Total Suspended Particulates (TSP) and respiratory particulates or Particulate Matter less than 10 mu m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) has numerous undesired consequences on human health. Air quality degradation far from the African continent, in the US and in Europe, caused by high concentrations of African dust, is seen as a major threat even though most of these countries are very distant from the Sahara. Surprisingly, no estimates of TSP or PM10 levels near the Saharan dust source are available. Based on horizontal visibility observations which are reduced by the presence of dust in the atmosphere, TSP and PM10 levels are estimated throughout the year 2000 at Nouakchott-Airport, Mauritania, using relations found in the literature. It appears that concentrations of particles are significant both in terms magnitude and frequency, as the 24-hour PM10 thresholds established by the US EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standards and the EU Limits Values for Air Quality were exceeded 86 and 137 times, respectively. The average annual concentration is far above air quality standards and estimated at 159 mu g m(-3) for TSP and 108 mu g m(-3) for PM10. These very high particulate levels are likely to represent an important public health hazard and should be considered as a major environmental risk. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of biochemical network parameter distributions in cell populations
Hasenauer, J; Waldherr, S; Schliemann, Monica ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailEstimation of bioreactor efficiency through structured hydrodynamic modeling case study of a Pichia pastoris fed-batch process.
Delvigne, Frank ULg; El Mejdoub, Thami ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2005), 121-124

In this article, two theories are unified to investigate the effect of hydrodynamics on a specific bioprocess: the network-of-zones (NOZ) hydrodynamic structured modeling approach (developed by several ... [more ▼]

In this article, two theories are unified to investigate the effect of hydrodynamics on a specific bioprocess: the network-of-zones (NOZ) hydrodynamic structured modeling approach (developed by several researchers but applied to only a few bioprocesses) and the effectiveness factor eta approach. Two process scales were investigated (20 and 500 L), and for each, hydrodynamics were quantified using an NOZ validated by homogeneity time measurements. Several impeller combinations inducing quite different hydrodynamics were tested at the 20-L scale. After this step, effectiveness factors were determined for each fermentation run. To achieve this, a perfectly mixed microbial kinetic model was evaluated by using simple Monod kinetics with a fed-batch mass balance. This methodology permitted determination of the effectiveness factor with more accuracy because of the relation with the perfect case deduced from the Monod kinetics. It appeared that for the small scale, eta decreased until reaching a value of approx 0.7 (30% from the ideal case) for the three impeller systems investigated. However, stirring systems that include hydrofoils seemed to maintain higher effectiveness factors during the course of the fermentation. This effect can be attributed to oxygen transfer performance or to homogenization efficiency exhibited by the hydrofoils. To distinguish the oxygen transfer from the homogenization component of the effectiveness factor, these phenomena were analyzed separately. After determining the evolution of etaO2 linked to oxygen transfer for each of the fermentation runs, the NOZ model was employed to quantify substrate gradient appearance. After this step, another effectiveness factor, etamix, related to mixing was defined. Consequently, it is possible to distinguish the relative importance of the mixing effect and oxygen transfer on a given bioprocess. The results have highlighted an important scale effect on the bioprocess that can be analyzed using the NOZ model. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of breeding values of Belgian trotters in animal model
Leroy, Pascal ULg; Kafidi, N.; Bassleer, E.

(1988)

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See detailEstimation of direct unit costs associated with non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in five European countries
Bouee, S.; Lafuma, A.; Fagnani, F. et al

in Rheumatology International (2006), 26(12), 1063-1072

The objective of this study was to estimate the unit costs of non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in five European countries based on the results of the SOTI and TROPOS clinical trials in postmenopausal ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to estimate the unit costs of non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in five European countries based on the results of the SOTI and TROPOS clinical trials in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. The information recorded in the Case Report Forms was used. The perspective of third party payers was adopted. Hip fracture unit cost was the highest. The ranges of costs among countries was narrow for hip from 8,346 euro (Italy) to 9,907 euro (France), but wider for other fractures: 890 euro (Spain) to 2,022 euro (Italy) for wrist, 1,167 euro (Spain) to 3,268 euro (Italy) for pelvis, 837 euro (Spain) to 2,116 euro (Italy) for sternum/clavicle, 565 euro (Spain) to 908 euro (France) for rib, 1,518 euro (Spain) to 3,651 euro (Belgium) for humerus, 1,805 euro (Spain) to 3,521 euro (Italy) for leg. The costs of those fractures should be considered when estimating the cost of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of direct unit costs associated with non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in six European countries
Bouée, S.; Lafuma, A.; Fagnani, F. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 13

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See detailEstimation of dominance variance for growth traits with sire-dam subclass effects in a crossbred population of pigs
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Faux, Pierre ULg; Piedboeuf, Maureen et al

Poster (2014)

Nonadditive genetic effects may be not negligible but are often ignored in genetic evaluations. The most important nonadditive effect is probably dominance. Prediction of dominance effects should allow a ... [more ▼]

Nonadditive genetic effects may be not negligible but are often ignored in genetic evaluations. The most important nonadditive effect is probably dominance. Prediction of dominance effects should allow a more precise estimation of the total genetic merit, particularly in populations that use specialized sire and dam lines, and with large number of full-sibs, like pigs. Computation of the inverted dominance relationship matrix, D-1, is difficult with large datasets. But, D-1 can be replaced by the inverted sire-dam subclass relationship matrix F-1, which represents the average dominance effect of full-sibs. The aim of this study was to estimate dominance variance for longitudinal measurements of body weight (BW) in a crossbred population of pigs The dataset consisted of 20,120 BW measurements recorded between 50 and 210 d of age on 2,341 crossbred pigs (Piétrain X Landrace). A random regression model was used to estimate variance components. Fixed effects were sex and date of recording. Random effects were additive genetic, permanent environment, parental dominance and residual. Dominance variance represented 7 to 9% of the total variance and 11 to 30% of additive variance. Those results showed that dominance variance exists for growth traits in pigs and may be relatively large. The estimation of dominance effects may be useful for mate selection program to maximize genetic merit of progeny. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of dominance variance in purebred Yorkshire swine
Culbertson, M. S.; Mabry, J. W.; Misztal, I. et al

in Journal of Animal Science (1998), 76(2), 448-451

We used 179,485 Yorkshire reproductive and 239,354 Yorkshire growth records to estimate additive and dominance variances by Method Fraktur R. Estimates were obtained for number born alive (NBA), 21-d ... [more ▼]

We used 179,485 Yorkshire reproductive and 239,354 Yorkshire growth records to estimate additive and dominance variances by Method Fraktur R. Estimates were obtained for number born alive (NBA), 21-d litter weight (LWT), days to 104.5 kg (DAYS), and backfat at 104.5 kg (BF). The single-trait models for NBA and LWT included the fixed effects of contemporary group and regression on inbreeding percentage and the random effects mate within contemporary group, animal permanent environment, animal additive, and parental dominance. The single-trait models for DAYS and BF included the fixed effects of contemporary group, sex, and regression on inbreeding percentage and the random effects litter of birth, dam permanent environment, animal additive, and parental dominance. Final estimates were obtained from six samples for each trait. Regression coefficients for 10% inbreeding were found to be -.23 for NBA, -.52 kg for LWT, 2.1 d for DAYS, and 0 mm for BF. Estimates of additive and dominance variances expressed as a percentage of phenotypic variances were, respectively, 8.8 +/- .5 and 2.2 +/- .7 for NBA, 8.1 +/- 1.1 and 6.3 +/- .9 for LWT, 33.2 +/- .4 and 10.3 +/- 1.5 for DAYS, and 43.6 +/- .9 and 4.8 +/- .7 for BF. The ratio of dominance to additive variances ranged from .78 to .11. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of dominance variance with sire-dam subclass effects in a crossbred population of pigs
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Faux, Pierre ULg; Piedboeuf, Maureen et al

Poster (2013, August 26)

Nonadditive genetic effects may be not negligible but are often ignored in genetic evaluations. The most important nonadditive effect is probably dominance. Prediction of dominance effects should allow a ... [more ▼]

Nonadditive genetic effects may be not negligible but are often ignored in genetic evaluations. The most important nonadditive effect is probably dominance. Prediction of dominance effects should allow a more precise estimation of the total genetic merit, particularly in populations that use specialized sire and dam lines, and with large number of full-sibs, like pigs. Computation of the inverted dominance relationship matrix, D-1, is difficult with large datasets. But, D-1 can be replaced by the inverted sire-dam subclass relationship matrix F-1, which represents the average dominance effect of full-sibs. The aim of this study was to estimate dominance variance for longitudinal measurements of body weight (BW) in a crossbred population of pigs, assuming unrelated sire-dam subclass effects. The edited dataset consisted of 20,120 BW measurements recorded between 50 and 210 d of age on 2,341 crossbred pigs from 89 Piétrain sires and 169 Landrace dams. A random regression model was used to estimate variance components. Fixed effects were sex and date of recording. Random effects were additive genetic, permanent environment, sire-dam subclass and residual. Random effects, except residual, were modeled with linear splines. Only full-sib contributions were considered by using uncorrelated sire-dam classes. Estimated heritability of BW increased with age from 0.40 to 0.60. Inversely, estimated dominance decreased with age, from 0.28 to 0.01. Ratio of dominance relative to additive variance was high at early age (58.3% at 50 d) and decreased with age (2.6% at 200 d). Those results showed that dominance effects might be important for early growth traits in pigs. However, this need to be confirmed and dominance relationships will be included in the next steps. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of dominance variance with sire-dam subclass effects in a crossbred population of pigs
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Jaspart, Véronique; Wavreille, José et al

in Book of Abstract of the 64th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Animal Science (2013)

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See detailEstimation of effective and total erythropoiesis in myelodysplasia using serum transferrin receptor and erythropoietin concentrations, with automated reticulocyte parameters.
Bowen, D. T.; Culligan, D.; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in Leukemia : Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K (1994), 8(1), 151-5

The erythroid abnormality in patients with myelodysplasia (MDS) is multifactorial, with ineffective erythropoiesis and poor in vitro progenitor response to erythropoietin (EPO). Serum EPO concentration is ... [more ▼]

The erythroid abnormality in patients with myelodysplasia (MDS) is multifactorial, with ineffective erythropoiesis and poor in vitro progenitor response to erythropoietin (EPO). Serum EPO concentration is variable among patients for a given haemoglobin concentration. We studied 19 non-transfusion-dependent patients with MDS, and 13 healthy elderly control subjects in an attempt to define the factors governing variability in serum EPO and to further characterise the anaemia of MDS. Serum EPO concentration was appropriate for the degree of anaemia in 15/19 MDS patients, and was positively related to mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell haemoglobin (MCH), and percentage highly fluorescent reticulocytes (% HFR), but not to absolute or percentage reticulocyte count. Although the observed/predicted ratio for serum transferrin receptor (TfR) concentration was low in 12 of 19 MDS subjects, no relationship to haemoglobin concentration, reticulocytes or serum EPO was seen. Serum TfR was positively correlated with WBC and platelet counts. Serum TfR was higher in patients with sideroblastic anaemia than refractory anaemia. Standardized in vivo p50 was positively correlated to red cell 2,3 diphosphoglycerate concentration, although this was not the only factor influencing the oxygen dissociation curve. We conclude that effective erythroid output responsive to endogenous EPO drive in MDS is positively related to MCV, MCH and % HFR. Serum TfR may not represent effective output as precisely as % HFR, but may be proportional to total marrow erythropoietic activity. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of fatty acid profile in cow milk by mid-infrared spectrometry
Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Dardenne, Pierre; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

Poster (2006, April 03)

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See detailEstimation of fatty acid profile in cow milk by mid-infrared spectrometry
Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Dardenne, Pierre; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

in European seminar on infrared spectroscopy (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (5 ULg)