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See detailDifferential diagnosis of dementia using functional neuroimaging
Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg

in Jagust, William; D'Esposito, Mark (Eds.) Imaging the aging brain (2009)

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See detailDifferential diagnosis of equine systolic murmurs
Amory, Hélène ULg

in In the Proceedings of the Voorjaardagen Congress (2008)

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See detailDifferential diagnosis of facial pain
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2001), 101(1), 6-9

We will describe the differential diagnosis of primary and secondary facial pains and present illustrative case studies. The diagnosis of facial pain needs a multidisciplinary approach if the clinical ... [more ▼]

We will describe the differential diagnosis of primary and secondary facial pains and present illustrative case studies. The diagnosis of facial pain needs a multidisciplinary approach if the clinical presentation is not pathognomic. While patients with acute facial pain urgently need treatment, those with chronic facial pain need at priority a correct diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential diagnosis of neurologically expressed disorders in Western European cattle
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Claes, L.; Dewaele, Albert et al

in Revue Scientifique et Technique (International Office of Epizootics) (2003), 22(1), 83-102

A classification of neurological or neurologically expressed disorders that occur in Western European cattle aged 12 month and over has been established on the basis of aetiology, frequency and conditions ... [more ▼]

A classification of neurological or neurologically expressed disorders that occur in Western European cattle aged 12 month and over has been established on the basis of aetiology, frequency and conditions of appearance, age and type of animals concerned and the main clinical signs observed. Neurologically expressed disorders have been classified according to different groups of causes: biological, non-biological and non-specific or unknown. Differential diagnosis of neurologically expressed disorders is an essential element in the clinical epidemiological surveillance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. A growing number of aetiologies are described in the scientific literature. The identification and centralised management of neurological disorders will make it possible, one the one hand, to take account of the inherent variability in the clinical forms encountered and in the diagnostic approaches of the observers and, on the other hand, to identify new risk factors in order to control them. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential display of gene expression in cerebral edema induced by fulminant hepatic failure
Margulies, J. E.; Detry, Olivier ULg; Rozga, J. et al

in Surgical Forum (1998), 45

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See detailDifferential distribution of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, and RNA in adenovirus-induced intranuclear regions of HeLa cells.
Thiry, Marc ULg; Puvion-Dutilleul, F.

in Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry : Official Journal of the Histochemistry Society (1995), 43(8), 749-59

We investigated in great detail the fine spatial distribution of nucleic acids within adenovirus-infected HeLa cells by various immunogold labeling procedures. To detect DNA, we used the in situ terminal ... [more ▼]

We investigated in great detail the fine spatial distribution of nucleic acids within adenovirus-infected HeLa cells by various immunogold labeling procedures. To detect DNA, we used the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-immunogold technique. In addition to the expected evident label over the condensed host chromatin and the structures containing viral double- and single-stranded DNA, label was consistently revealed over round fibrillar spots. By contrast, other virus-induced substructures, such as compact rings, crystalloids, clear amorphous inclusions, and electron-dense amorphous inclusions, displayed no significant label. Except for the viral single-stranded DNA accumulation sites, identical labeling pattern was obtained with the in situ nick-translation-immunogold method. We further labeled the sections with anti-RNA antibodies. Label was present not only over the cytoplasm and the intranuclear fibrillogranular network but also quite obviously over the compact rings and interchromatin granule clusters. None was seen over the other nuclear structures of infected cells, notably over the fibrillar spots. We suggest that these fibrillar spots might be involved in the formation of the viral, non-encapsidated, double-stranded DNA storage site. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effect of cutanoeous stimuli on responses to electrical or magnetic stimulation of the humain brain
DAY, B. L.; DRESSLER, D.; MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULg et al

in Journal of Physiology (1988)

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See detailDifferential effect of dietary spermine on alkaline phosphatase activity in jejunum and ileum of unweaned rats
Peulen, Olivier ULg; Gharbi, Myriam ULg; Powroznik, Brigitte et al

in Biochimie (2004), 86(7), 487-493

Spermine is a low molecular weight polyamine involved in the postnatal maturation of the gut. When it is administered orally to suckling rats it induces the maturation of their spleen, liver, pancreas ... [more ▼]

Spermine is a low molecular weight polyamine involved in the postnatal maturation of the gut. When it is administered orally to suckling rats it induces the maturation of their spleen, liver, pancreas, and small intestine. We showed that this polyamine modulates differently the activity of alkaline phosphatase in jejunum and ileum in suckling rat. In 14-day-old rat which had received spermine orally for 3 days, once daily, an increase of alkaline phosphatase activity in the jejunum and a decrease of this activity in the ileum was observed. Alkaline phosphatase was located at the bottom of the villus in the control jejunum and in the whole length of the villus in spermine-treated rats. On the contrary, in ileum of controls, this enzyme was present in the whole length of the villus but disappeared in the spermine-treated animals. An enzyme mass shift was observed in the small intestine after spermine administration. Spermine administration did not change the expression of genes coding for alkaline phosphatase, suggesting a post-transcriptional modification. (C) 2004 Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of aging on the neural correlates of recollection and familiarity
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49

The present experiment aimed to investigate age differences in the neural correlates of familiarity and recollection, while keeping performance similar across age groups by varying task difficulty. Twenty ... [more ▼]

The present experiment aimed to investigate age differences in the neural correlates of familiarity and recollection, while keeping performance similar across age groups by varying task difficulty. Twenty young and twenty older adults performed an episodic memory task in an event-related fMRI design. At encoding, participants were presented with pictures, either once or twice. Then, they performed a recognition task, with a Remember/Know paradigm. A similar performance was observed for the two groups in the Easy condition for recollection and in the Hard condition for familiarity. Imaging data revealed the classic recollection-related and familiarity-related networks, common to young and older groups. In addition, we observed that some activity related to recollection (left frontal, left temporal, left parietal cortices and left parahippocampus) and familiarity (bilateral anterior cingulate, right frontal gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus) was reduced in older compared to young adults. However, for recollection processes only, older adults additionally recruited the right precuneus, possibly to successfully compensate for their difficulties, as suggested by a positive correlation between recollection and precuneus activity. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of cocaine and dopaminergic agonists on hypokinesia induced by dopaminergic antagonists
Terry, P.; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Monograph Series (1996), 142

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See detailDifferential Effects of Cocaine on Dopamine Neuron Firing in Awake and Anesthetized Rats
Koulchitsky, Stanislav ULg; DE BACKER, Benjamin ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg et al

in Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (2012), 37

Cocaine (benzoylmethylecgonine), a natural alkaloid, is a powerful psychostimulant and a highly addictive drug. Unfortunately, the relationships between its behavioral and electrophysiological effects are ... [more ▼]

Cocaine (benzoylmethylecgonine), a natural alkaloid, is a powerful psychostimulant and a highly addictive drug. Unfortunately, the relationships between its behavioral and electrophysiological effects are not clear. We investigated the effects of cocaine on the firing of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons, both in anesthetized and awake rats, using pre-implanted multielectrode arrays and a recently developed telemetric recording system. In anesthetized animals, cocaine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) produced a general decrease of the firing rate and bursting of DA neurons, sometimes preceded by a transient increase in both parameters, as previously reported by others. In awake rats, however, injection of cocaine led to a very different pattern of changes in firing. A decrease in firing rate and bursting was observed in only 14% of DA neurons. Most of the other DA neurons underwent increases in firing rate and bursting: these changes were correlated with locomotor activity in 52% of the neurons, but were uncorrelated in 29% of them. Drug concentration measurements indicated that the observed differences between the two conditions did not have a pharmacokinetic origin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that cocaine injection differentially affects the electrical activity of DA neurons in awake and anesthetized states. The observed increases in neuronal activity may in part reflect the cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation found ex vivo in these neurons. Our observations also show that electrophysiological recordings in awake animals can uncover drug effects, which are masked by general anesthesia. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of context on psychomotor sensitization to ethanol and cocaine
Didone, Vincent ULg; Quoilin, Caroline; Dieupart, Julie et al

in Behavioural Pharmacology (2016), 27(2 & 3), 173-181

Repeated drug injections lead to sensitization of their stimulant effects in mice, a phenomenon sometimes referred to as drug psychomotor sensitization. Previous studies showed that sensitization to ... [more ▼]

Repeated drug injections lead to sensitization of their stimulant effects in mice, a phenomenon sometimes referred to as drug psychomotor sensitization. Previous studies showed that sensitization to cocaine is context dependent as its expression is reduced in an environment that was not paired with cocaine administration. In contrast, the effects of the test context on ethanol sensitization remain unclear. In the present study, female OF1 mice were repeatedly injected with 1.5 g/kg ethanol to test for both the effects of context novelty/familiarity and association on ethanol sensitization. A first group of mice was extensively pre-exposed to the test context before ethanol sensitization and ethanol injections were paired with the test context (familiar and paired group). A second group was not pre-exposed to the test context, but ethanol injections were paired with the test context (nonfamiliar and paired group). Finally, a third group of mice was not pre-exposed to the test context and ethanol was repeatedly injected in the home cage (unpaired group). Control groups were similarly exposed to the test context, but were injected with saline. In a second experiment, cocaine was used as a positive control. The same behavioral procedure was used, except that mice were injected with 10 mg/kg cocaine instead of ethanol. The results show a differential involvement of the test context in the sensitization to ethanol and cocaine. Cocaine sensitization is strongly context dependent and is not expressed in the unpaired group. In contrast, the expression of ethanol sensitization is independent of the context in which it was administered, but is strongly affected by the relative novelty/familiarity of the environment. Extensive pre-exposure to the test context prevented the expression of ethanol sensitization. One possible explanation is that expression of ethanol sensitization requires an arousing environment. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential Effects of D1 and D2 Dopamine-Receptor Agonists and Antagonists on Appetitive and Consummatory Aspects of Male Sexual Behavior in Japanese Quail
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Castagna, C.; Ball, G. F.

in Physiology & Behavior (1997), 62(3), 571-80

Pharmacological studies in Japanese quail based on behavioral tests with a variety of dopaminergic compounds suggest that the activation of D2 dopamine receptors inhibits, and the activation of D1 ... [more ▼]

Pharmacological studies in Japanese quail based on behavioral tests with a variety of dopaminergic compounds suggest that the activation of D2 dopamine receptors inhibits, and the activation of D1 dopamine receptors enhances, appetitive and consummatory components of male sexual behavior. This hypothesis was tested by studying the behavioral effects of specific D1 and D2 dopaminergic-receptor agonists and antagonists in castrated male Japanese quail chronically treated with exogenous testosterone (subcutaneous Silastic implants). The effects of 5 compounds were tested: 1 D1 (SKF38393) and 2 D2 (PPHT and quinpirole) agonists, and 1 D1 (SCH23390) and 1 D2 (Spiperone) antagonist. All compounds were tested at a low and a high dose (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, respectively, for all drugs, except spiperone where the doses were 2 and 10 mg/kg). A consistent effect of all drugs on consummatory sexual behavior was observed: it was stimulated by the D1 agonist and the D2 antagonist, but inhibited by the D1 antagonist and the D2 agonists. Far fewer effects of the treatments were detected on the measures of appetitive behavior. Measures of appetitive behavior were decreased by the 2 D2 agonists, but not affected by the other treatments. These data suggest that male copulatory behavior in quail is stimulated by dopamine acting on D1 receptors, but inhibited by activation of the D2 receptor subtype. The partial dissociation observed between the effects of the same treatments on appetitive and consummatory aspects of sexual behavior also suggests that these 2 behavioral systems may be controlled by the action of dopamine on different neuronal systems. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of drawing and indirect dopamine agonists on the induction of gnawing in C57BI/6J mice
Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Witkin, J. M.

in Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (The) (1995), 273(1), 7-15

Compared the ability of indirect dopamine (DA) agonists to induce gnawing behavior (GB) in male C57BL/6J mice with that of direct DA agonists acting at DA D-sub-1 or D-sub-2 receptor subtypes. Eight Ss ... [more ▼]

Compared the ability of indirect dopamine (DA) agonists to induce gnawing behavior (GB) in male C57BL/6J mice with that of direct DA agonists acting at DA D-sub-1 or D-sub-2 receptor subtypes. Eight Ss were used per dose. Holes left by Ss on corrugations of packing cardboard were used as an objective index of GB. Indirect DA agonists, including DA releasers such as fencamfamine and amfonelic acid and DA uptake inhibitors such as cocaine and nomifensine, produced dose-dependent increases in GB. None of the direct agonists (e.g., apomorphine, quinpirole) increased GB. The dopaminergic nature of GB was confirmed in studies in which a host of compounds (e.g., nicotine, caffeine, dizocilpine) with primary actions at nondopaminergic sites did not induce GB. Given the general contrast between the effects of direct and indirect DA agonists, this procedure could serve as a rapid in vivo method of distinguishing direct- from indirect-acting DA agonists. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved) [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of global versus local testosterone on singing behavior and its underlying neural substrate.
Alward, Beau A.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Ball, Gregory F.

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013), 110(48), 19573-8

Steroid hormones regulate multiple but distinct aspects of social behaviors. Testosterone (T) has multiple effects on learned courtship song in that it regulates both the motivation to sing in a ... [more ▼]

Steroid hormones regulate multiple but distinct aspects of social behaviors. Testosterone (T) has multiple effects on learned courtship song in that it regulates both the motivation to sing in a particular social context as well as the quality of song produced. The neural substrate(s) where T acts to regulate the motivation to sing as opposed to other aspects of song has not been definitively characterized. We show here that T implants in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) of castrated male canaries (Serinus canaria) increase song rate but do not enhance acoustic features such as song stereotypy compared with birds receiving peripheral T that can act globally throughout the brain. Strikingly, T action in the POM increased song control nuclei volume, consistent with the hypothesis that singing activity induces neuroplasticity in the song control system independent of T acting in these nuclei. When presented with a female canary, POM-T birds copulated at a rate comparable to birds receiving systemic T but produced fewer calls and songs in her presence. Thus, POM is a key site where T acts to activate copulation and increase song rate, an appetitive sexual behavior in songbirds, but T action in other areas of the brain or periphery (e.g., HVC, dopaminergic cell groups, or the syrinx) is required to enhance the quality of song (i.e., stereotypy) as well as regulate context-specific vocalizations. These results have broad implications for research concerning how steroids act at multiple brain loci to regulate distinct sociosexual behaviors and the associated neuroplasticity. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, dopamine and somatostatin and their second messengers on the mRNA levels of gonadotropin IIb subunit and growth hormone in the teleost fish, tilapia
Melamed, P.; Gur, G.; Elizur, A. et al

in Neuroendocrinology (1996)

In cultured pituitary cells of tilapia, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 10 nM 4-24 h), elevation of cyclic AMP (by 10 microM forskolin or 0.2 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine: IBMX 0.5-36 h) or ... [more ▼]

In cultured pituitary cells of tilapia, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 10 nM 4-24 h), elevation of cyclic AMP (by 10 microM forskolin or 0.2 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine: IBMX 0.5-36 h) or activation of protein kinase C (PKC; by 12.5 nM tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate: TPA, 0.5-24 h) all increased gonadotropin (GtH) II beta steady state mRNA levels by three to four-fold. The involvement of PKA and PKC in the GnRH stimulatory effect on both GtH release and GtH II beta mRNA levels was corroborated by use of the PKA and PKC inhibitors, H89 and GF109203X, respectively (100 nM) which attenuated the GnRH effect. Incubation with actinomycin D (8 microM, 4-21 h) after preexposure for 24 h to either forskolin (10 microM) or TPA (12.5 nM), revealed that rates of transcript degradation were slower in forskolin-treated cells (T 1/2 = 14.1 h) than in control or TPA-treated cells (T 1/2 = 8.47 or 8.38 h), suggesting a stabilizing effect on the mRNA. Dopamine (DA; 10 microM, 4-36 h) had no apparent effect on steady state mRNA levels of GtH II beta, but reduced GtH release by as much as 75%. Steady state levels of growth hormone (GH) mRNA were not affected by exposure to GnRH (10 nM, 4-24 h), although GH release was more than doubled. Similarly, activation of PKC (by TPA 12.5 nM, 1.5-36 h), which was shown to be essential for the GnRH-stimulatory effect on GH release, did not alter levels of the GH transcript, but increased GH release by more than fivefold. DA (10 microM, 4-24 h) moderately increased GH transcript levels (160%) with similar kinetics but lower potency than direct elevation of cAMP (by 10 microM forskolin or 0.2 mM IBMX, 0.5-36 h) which increased transcript levels by more than fourfold. The involvement of PKA in the DA effect was confirmed when the PKA inhibitor H89 (100 nM, 15 min prior to DA exposure) attenuated the DA effect on GH mRNA levels. Exposure of cells to actinomycin D (8 microM, 2-16 h) after treatment with forskolin (10 microM, 24 h) led to a slower rate of transcript degradation than in control cells (T 1/2 = 6.5 h vs. T 1/2 = 4.36 h), suggesting that cAMP also elicits a stabilizing effect on GH mRNA. Somatostatin (100 nM, 0.5-36 h) had no clear effect on GH transcript levels, but reduced GH release by as much as 90%. These results suggest that activation of either cAMP-PKA or PKC pathways can, possibly by different mechanisms, stimulate mRNA levels of the GtH II beta gene, but that only the cAMP-PKA pathway stimulates GH mRNA levels. It would appear therefore that GnRH, although stimulating GH release, does not regulate GH transcription in this fish. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of high CO2 during the First half of incubation on embryonic chick development according to broiler breeder age and storage time
Witters, A.; Debonne, M.; Everaert, Nadia ULg et al

in Avian and Poultry Biology Reviews (2008)

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See detailDifferential effects of hypoxia on étoposide induced apoptosis according to the cancer cell lines
Cosse, Jean-Philippe ULg; Sermeus, Audrey; Vannuvel, Kayleen et al

Poster (2006)

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