Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotion, faux souvenirs et vieillissement normal.
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in société française de psychologie: cognition, émotion et société - 52eme congrès (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 139 (3 ULg)
See detailEmotion, mort et conscience. Le premier Sartre et Freud
Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2013, May 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional aspects of mental time travel
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2007), 30

We consider three possible reasons why humans might accord a privileged status to emotional information when mentally traveling backward or forward in time. First, mental simulation of emotional ... [more ▼]

We consider three possible reasons why humans might accord a privileged status to emotional information when mentally traveling backward or forward in time. First, mental simulation of emotional situations helps one to make adaptive decisions. Second, it can serve an emotion regulation function. Third, it helps people to construct and maintain a positive view of the self. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional competencies of the sport coach: A qualitative approach within a physical activity programme for multiple sclerosis patients.
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Defossa, Clément; Cloes, Marc ULg

in Sanchez Molina, J. A.; Carballo, O.; Gonzalez Valeiro, M. A. (Eds.) Actas del Congreso Internacional de la AIESEP 2010 « Place and role of physical educators in promoting an active lifestyle » (2011)

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by functional impairments (fatigue, motor weakness, spasticity, poor balance) and limitations in social functioning. Accordingly, persons with MS are more affected ... [more ▼]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by functional impairments (fatigue, motor weakness, spasticity, poor balance) and limitations in social functioning. Accordingly, persons with MS are more affected by sedentarity and not enough aware of their physical capacities. Finally, those behaviours lead to physical deconditioning and general poor health in this population. To encourage physical activity with MS people, a specific coaching programme whereby MS patient are individually supported by a sport coach has been launched at the University Hospital Center of Liège. In this context this study aimed to (1) describe the intervention of the coach ;(2) link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach ; (3) propose recommendations to improve MS patient’s physical activity management. Behaviors, attitudes, values, representations and emotional competencies of seven coaches were analyzed using both visible (audio and video recording) and invisible (questionnaires and interviews) data. Results show that coaching efficacy with MS patient implies a high support and cooperation level of the coach and a highly specific approach characterized by a systematic appraisal of patient’s behaviors revealing his current psychological and physical state. Recommendations for the coach education with an emphasis on social and emotional skills are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional competencies of the sport coach: A qualitative approach within a physical activity programme for multiple sclerosis patients. A case study
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Defossa, Clément; Cloes, Marc ULg

Poster (2010, October)

The main purposes of this study were to describe the intervention and to link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach in a physical activity programme for MS patients. We wanted also to close ... [more ▼]

The main purposes of this study were to describe the intervention and to link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach in a physical activity programme for MS patients. We wanted also to close this study proposing recommendations to improve MS patient physical activity management. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional facial expression decoding in children high in social anxiety
Blairy, Sylvie ULg; Massin, Anne

Poster (2007, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional Facial Expression Recognition and Expressivity in Type I and Type II Alcohol Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; El Hawa, Maya; Duchateau et al

in Journal of Nonverbal Behavior (2014), 38(1), 89-105

Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present ... [more ▼]

Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present study aimed to explore emotional facial expression (EFE) recognition and posed and spontaneous EFE expressivity in male ADs divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology and the impact of their interpersonal relationship quality on the potential nonverbal deficits. Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants took part in an EFE recognition task and an EFE expressivity task that considered personal emotional events (spontaneous expressivity) and EFE in response to a photo or word cue (posed expressivity). Coding was based on judges’ ratings of participants’ emotional facial expressions. Participants additionally completed a questionnaire on interpersonal relationship quality. Results: No difference between the three groups emerged in the EFE recognition task. Type II ADs showed heightened deficits compared with type I ADs in EFE expressivity: Judges perceived less accurate posed EFE in response to a cue word and less intense and positive spontaneous EFE in type II ADs compared to control participants. In addition, type II ADs reported more relationship difficulties compared to both type I ADs and control participants. These interpersonal relationship difficulties were related to some of the EFE expressivity deficits of AD-IIs. Conclusions: This study underlines the important differences between the interpersonal functioning of AD subtypes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEmotional facial expressions decoding in siblings of children with autism
Dethier, Marie ULg; Sojic, Barbara ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2010, October 08)

The ability to identify other people’s emotions, including their emotional facial expression (EFE), is fundamental to many social processes. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show deficits ... [more ▼]

The ability to identify other people’s emotions, including their emotional facial expression (EFE), is fundamental to many social processes. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show deficits in several empathy-related processes, including EFE decoding (e.g. Ashwin, Chapman, Colle, & Baron-Cohen, 2007). The object of this study was to investigate the capacity to decode accurately EFE in siblings of children with ASD. Indeed, autism is considered to be substantially influenced by genetic factors and relatives of ASD individuals present different type of deficits including the domains of language, theory of mind, and executive functioning (e.g., Fombonne, Bolton, Prior, Jordan, & Rutter, 1997). Fifteen 6-to-15 years old siblings of children with ASD were compared to matched siblings of typically developing children on a decoding task of adults EFE. The children had to match a story depicting an adult in an emotional situation to a picture of an adult EFE. The emotions investigated were joy, anger, sadness, fear, surprise, disgust, and contempt. The differences of EFE accuracy between siblings of ASD and siblings of typically developing children are discussed in reference to the characteristics of the relationship with their ASD brother or sister. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 149 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional intelligence and personality in major depression: Trait versus state effects.
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Bianchi, Julien

in Psychiatry Research (2009), 166(1), 63-8

Several studies have explored the link between depression and personality with classical personality questionnaires like the Revised NEO Personality Inventory and the Temperament and Character Inventory ... [more ▼]

Several studies have explored the link between depression and personality with classical personality questionnaires like the Revised NEO Personality Inventory and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). However, no studies have been conducted with the revised form of the TCI (TCI-R). Moreover, since a few studies conducted on normal subjects suggest that Emotional Intelligence (EI) would be lower in depression, but that the concept has not been explicitly measured in patients with major depressive disorder, EI was assessed here with the modified version of Schutte's scale among a group of depressive patients. In addition, both personality and EI measures were carried out during the clinical state of depression and after the remission to assess the state versus trait aspect. The study was conducted on 54 major depressive inpatients (20 in remission) and 54 matched controls. As expected, depressive patients exhibited higher score on harm avoidance (HA), and lower scores on persistence (P), self-directedness (SD), cooperativeness (C), optimism/emotional regulation subscore, and total EI score as compared with controls. In the period of remission, patients again had elevated scores on HA, and lower scores on SD. In contrast, the total EI score did not differ between controls and depressive patients in remission. The results confirm that some personality dimensions are dependent on both state and trait aspects of depression, and suggest that EI only seems to be affected during the clinical state. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 214 (23 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional intelligence and self-efficacy among physical education teachers
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Hansenne, Michel ULg; Delcour, Romy et al

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education (2013), 32(4), 342-354

Research has documented a positive association between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and well-being, performance and self-efficacy. The purpose of the current study was to examine potential associations ... [more ▼]

Research has documented a positive association between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and well-being, performance and self-efficacy. The purpose of the current study was to examine potential associations between EI and self-efficacy among physical education teachers. The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue) and the Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) were administered to a sample of 119 physical education teachers. The main results show a positive association between EI and self-efficacy, and more particularly that the sociability factor of EI predicted the TSES total score. Moreover, neither age nor teaching time experience was related to EI or self-efficacy scores. These results both confirm and extend previous findings on the association between EI and self-efficacy. Suggestions are provided for specific EI training for physical education teachers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional processing in a non-clinical psychosis-prone sample
Van't Wout, M.; Aleman, A.; Kessels, R. P. C. et al

in Schizophrenia Research (2004), 68

Symptoms of psychosis have been proposed to form part of a continuous distribution of experiences in the general population rather than being an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Indeed, schizotypal signs have ... [more ▼]

Symptoms of psychosis have been proposed to form part of a continuous distribution of experiences in the general population rather than being an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Indeed, schizotypal signs have been reported in subjects from nonclinical samples. Emotional processing has been documented to be deficient in schizophrenia. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis whether putatively psychosis-prone subjects would show abnormalities in emotion processing. Based on the extremes of Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale (LSHS) ratings of 200 undergraduate students, two groups of subjects (total N= 40) were selected. All 40 participants filled in the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). We compared both groups on an alexithymia questionnaire and on four behavioral emotional information processing tasks. Hallucination-proneness was associated with an increased subjective emotional arousal and fantasy-proneness. Although no differences between the high and low group were observed on three behavioral emotion processing tasks, on the affective word-priming task presentation of emotional stimuli was associated with longer reactions times to neutral words in high schizotypal subjects. Also, SPQ scores correlated with several emotion processing tasks. We conclude that these findings lend partial support to the hypothesis of continuity between symptoms characteristic of schizophrenia and psychosis-related phenomena in the normal population. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional Processing in Down Syndrome
Catale, Corinne ULg; Hogge, Michaël; Meulemans, Thierry ULg et al

in Books of Abstracts: 13th conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology (2003)

In addition to mental retardation, Down Syndrome (DS) children present emotional deficits. Some authors have suggested that the emotional deficits observed in DS can be related to developmental changes ... [more ▼]

In addition to mental retardation, Down Syndrome (DS) children present emotional deficits. Some authors have suggested that the emotional deficits observed in DS can be related to developmental changes. However, the link between emotion and cognitive processing remains unclear.This study aims to assess the relationships between emotional and cognitive processing in DS children. More specifically, we wanted to assess whether cognitive development could predict emotional deficits. Eighteen children DS and 18 chronological age-matched (CA) children were presented with emotional tasks designed to tap their abilities (i) to label emotion through emotional faces and prosody, (ii) to attribute, from stories, cognitive and emotional states to characters and (iii) to process face identity and gaze behaviour. Cognitive functioning was assessed including attentional treatment, visuo-spatial working memory, receptive language and logical reasoning. The results confirmed that DS performed worse on both cognitive and emotional tasks than CA children. There are also strong correlations between cognitive (including language and logical reasoning measures) and emotional measures. These results suggest that emotional troubles in DS are related to their global cognitive development; they also suggest that the degree of mental retardation can predict the importance of emotional deficits in DS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional regulation impairments following severe traumatic brain injury: an investigation of the body and facial feedback effects
Dethier, Marie ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg; Rosenberg, Hannah et al

in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2013), 19(4), 367-379

The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body and facial feedback in adults who had suffered from a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to gain some understanding of their ... [more ▼]

The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body and facial feedback in adults who had suffered from a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to gain some understanding of their difficulties in the regulation of negative emotions. Twenty-four participants with TBI and 28 control participants adopted facial expressions and body postures according to specific instructions and maintained these positions for 10 seconds. Expressions and postures entailed anger, sadness, and happiness as well as a neutral (baseline) condition. After each expression/posture manipulation, participants evaluated their subjective emotional state (including cheerfulness, sadness, and irritation). TBI participants were globally less responsive to the effects of body and facial feedback than control participants, F (1, 50) = 5.89, p = .02, η2 = .11. More interestingly, the TBI group differed from the Control group across emotions, F (8,400) = 2.51, p = .01, η2 = .05. Specifically, participants with TBI were responsive to happy but not to negative expression/posture manipulations whereas control participants were responsive to happy, angry, and sad expression/posture manipulations. In conclusion, TBI appears to impair the ability to recognise both the physical configuration of a negative emotion and its associated subjective feeling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional Response to Body and Facial Feedback in Alcohol-Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; Duchateau, Régis; El Hawa, Maya et al

in Alcoologie et Addictologie (2013), 35(2), 117-125

Introduction: The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body postures and facial expressions manipulation on subjective feelings in male alcohol dependent (ADs) divided into two ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body postures and facial expressions manipulation on subjective feelings in male alcohol dependent (ADs) divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology in order to gain some understanding of their difficulties in the regulation of emotions and in interpersonal relationships. Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants adopted facial expressions and body postures according to specific instructions and maintained these positions for 10 seconds. Expressions and postures entailed anger, sadness, and happiness as well as a neutral (baseline) condition. After each expression/posture manipulation, participants evaluated their subjective emotional state (including cheerfulness, sadness, and irritation). Results: The three groups reported heightened subjective feelings in concordance with the facial and posture manipulation with no difference emerging between AD and control participants, F(1, 60) = 0.01, p = .91, or between the three groups, F(2, 59) = 1.03, p = .36. Conclusions: Similarly to control participants, ADs from the two subtypes may be responsive to the combined effect of facial and body feedback and could, subsequently, benefit from its regulative effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Emotional Side of Paternalism: Do People Share What They Feel?
Silvestre, Aude ULg; Dardenne, Benoît ULg

Poster (2012, January 28)

We were interested in the kind of emotions felt and socially shared after experiencing paternalism (when A acts toward B with a fatherlike attitude) or blatant hostility. Participants had to read either a ... [more ▼]

We were interested in the kind of emotions felt and socially shared after experiencing paternalism (when A acts toward B with a fatherlike attitude) or blatant hostility. Participants had to read either a paternalist, hostile or factual version of the welcome speech of their new boss. They then were asked to write a text about how this day was going (social sharing measure). The results revealed that being the target of paternalism or hostility is an emotional episode which leads to social sharing of emotion. Hostility is a clearly negative episode, leading to negative social sharing. Paternalism is more ambiguous. Participants felt positive emotions (except for distrust) but they shared both positive and negative ones. Paternalism can be perceived as positive but seems to lead to negative outcomes. Our further step would be to test its negative effects on performance (reading span test). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (7 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional valence influences the rates of false memories
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Van der Linden, Martial; Laroi, Frank ULg

Poster (2006, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)