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See detailDeveloping Countries facing Global Warming: a Post-Kyoto Assessment. Round-table Debate
Ozer, Pierre ULg

in De Dapper, Morgan; Swinne, Danielle; Ozer, Pierre (Eds.) Developing Countries facing Global Warming: a Post-Kyoto Assessment. (2010)

This paper reports the results of a round-table debate organized by the Royal Academy for Overseas Sciences (RAOS) on Developing Countries facing Global Warming: a Post-Kyoto Assessment (Brussels, 13 June ... [more ▼]

This paper reports the results of a round-table debate organized by the Royal Academy for Overseas Sciences (RAOS) on Developing Countries facing Global Warming: a Post-Kyoto Assessment (Brussels, 13 June, 2009) to highlight the view of developing countries on adaptation to and mitigation of climate change. The participants convened to discuss the various aspects of climate change impacts and adaptation in developing countries preceding the Copenhagen Conference (UNFCCC COP 15) in December 2009. Here, we summarize the point of view of the two invited speakers representing developing countries. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping innovatie structures and mechanisms aiming to enhance the transfert of technologies from public institutions to the private sector.
Lardinois, M.; Totte, A.; Tounkara, L. et al

Poster (2006, September)

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See detailDeveloping national health sector monitoring and accountability platforms. The opportunity of IHP+ in Benin, Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal
Paul, Elisabeth ULg; Akpamoli, Alphonse; Ba, Amadou D. et al

Conference (2012, November 01)

There is now growing consensus about the importance of building and strengthening national monitoring platforms in order to facilitate the evaluation of large-scale health programmes and initiatives in ... [more ▼]

There is now growing consensus about the importance of building and strengthening national monitoring platforms in order to facilitate the evaluation of large-scale health programmes and initiatives in low- and middle-income countries [see the paper published in 2010 in The Lancet by Victora et al.]. This is also crucial for improving accountability, which is defined by the United Nations' Commission on Information and Accountability for Women's and Children's Health as a cyclical process of monitoring, review, and (remedial) action. The International Health Partnership and related initiatives (IHP+), World Health Organization and other partners have recently developed guidelines to support country-led platforms for monitoring, evaluation and review of national health strategies. The national Compacts promoted in the framework of IHP+ offer an excellent opportunity to foster the development of such country-led platforms for information and accountability. Indeed, a Compact formalises the commitments of the recipient government and health sector partners to increase financing efforts in the health sector, to respect aid effectiveness principles and to support the national health policy and strategies in a common planning, coordination, and monitoring & evaluation framework. IHP+ is also closely connected to initiatives such as the Health Metrics Network that aims to improve the quality of health information in developing countries. We propose to analyse how the Ministries of Health in four Francophone Western African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal) have seized the opportunity of IHP+ to strengthen their monitoring and accountability platforms, and assess what further actions could be taken in the future. We present a comparative analysis grid filled on the basis of the experience of the co-authors in supporting the process in the four countries. This composes the first step of an on-going research and experience sharing project supported by GRAP-PA Santé. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping Policy Responses to Address Environmental Migration in Asia and the Pacific.
Gemenne, François ULg; Brücker, Pauline

in Gallagher, Deborah R. (Ed.) Environmental Leadership. A Reference Handbook (2012)

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See detailDeveloping predictive dynamic models of complex intracellular networks for neurological disease
Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Depaulis, Antoine; Jackers, Pascale ULg et al

in FEBS Journal (2008), 275(Suppl. 1), 99-437

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See detailDeveloping situational judgment tests to assess organizational citizenship behaviours
Lothe, Benoit ULg; Hansez, Isabelle ULg

Conference (2014, August)

a) Purpose As Organizational Citizenship Behaviours (OCBs) positively influence a number of important outcomes (e.g. job performance, unit productivity, organizational efficiency, etc.) and are valued by ... [more ▼]

a) Purpose As Organizational Citizenship Behaviours (OCBs) positively influence a number of important outcomes (e.g. job performance, unit productivity, organizational efficiency, etc.) and are valued by managers as well, Organ, Podsakoff and Podsakoff (2010) assert the need “to try to identify and select those job candidates who have a propensity to exhibit these behaviours” (p.314). This study provides some empirical evidence about using Situational Judgment Tests (SJTs) for this specific target and allows us to discuss the main methodological issues in the development of such SJTs. b) Method Based on relevant best practices and recommendations from the literature (e.g. Weekley, Ployhart & Holtz, 2006), two distinct SJTs were especially developed to comply with OCBs assessment. The two SJTs differ on their job specificity degree (project manager in the industrial sector vs transversal function in the services sector), both propose ten different work related situations and, for each stem, five action proposals are available. Data were collected through online survey on two different samples (220 white collars professionals and 291 university students). Professionals were allowed to choose which SJT they wanted to participate, students were randomized within the two SJTS. An experimental manipulation of the response instructions (ipsative vs normative) was added within the student sample. OCBs were concurrently collected using self-reported measurement scales. c) Results In both samples (respectively professionals and students), the internal consistency was higher for the “job specific” SJT (α = .79 & .81) than for the “transversal job” SJT (α = .49 & 64). Notwithstanding, significant relations were found between the SJT scores and overall OCB ratings for both of the SJT forms in each of the two samples (r ranged from .30 to .57). Other specifics findings also provided substantial evidence for the concurrent validity of the SJTs to measure sub-dimensions of OCBs (altruism, courtesy, civic virtue, sportsmanship, loyalty and voice). d) Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to address the development and validation of a SJT for the assessment of OCBs. Review of the literature indicates that researches on techniques to predict OCBs are scarce and the present findings appear to surpass the average personality traits validity coefficients (r= .20) according to Organ & al. (2010)’s meta-analysis. There are two main practical implications. The first is the opportunity to use OCBs-SJTs as an alternative to assess applicants OCBs for job-specific or generic personnel selection issue. The second is to provide methodological development advices (e.g. the choice of response instruction) to ensure the SJT match the OCBs assessment requirement. Principal current limitations call for further research development that will be discussed: using different sources of OCBs rating, testing the incremental validity on personality tests, determining whether OCBs-SJTs are correlated with cognitive ability and establishing criterion validity with job performance. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping sustainable competences through the whole professional life
Dujardin, Jean-Marie ULg

Conference (2013, June)

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See detailDeveloping system-level fragility functions for performance-based fire engineering of buildings
Gernay, Thomas ULg; Elhami Khorasani, Negar

Scientific conference (2016, October 20)

This research contributes to the current efforts for developing probabilistic methods in structural fire engineering (SFE) to foster the shift towards performance-based design in the field. A methodology ... [more ▼]

This research contributes to the current efforts for developing probabilistic methods in structural fire engineering (SFE) to foster the shift towards performance-based design in the field. A methodology is presented to assess the risk related to structural failure due to fire in multi-story buildings. At the core of this methodology is the concept of fragility functions, which allows quantifying in a systematic way the effects of the uncertainties in both demand and capacity parameters on the reliability level. The fragility functions, adopted here for the purpose of SFE, yield the conditional probability to reach predefined damage states as a function of an intensity measure of the fire. The damage states are grouped in categories such as ‘slight’, ‘moderate’, ‘extensive’, and ‘complete’, for estimating the magnitude of the damage. The fragility functions are defined for an entire building and depend on parameters such as the structural type and the fire resistance rating of the structural components. As the functions give conditional probabilities, they are completed with probabilistic models for the occurrence of a fire in the building (i.e. likelihood of the hazard) and the expected value of the fire load density (i.e. intensity of the hazard). These models depend on the building occupancy type, surface area, and active fire protection measures. Finally, one can obtain the (total) probability to reach different levels of potential damage for buildings of different typologies, structural design, size and occupancy. In addition, similar to earthquake engineering, one can also estimate the probability of reaching a certain damage state for a given probability of fire hazard. The methodology is illustrated for prototype multi-story steel buildings. An important contribution is the quantification of the safety level at the building scale, as opposed to an individual component. The results provide an insight for the discussion about the evolution of the design codes for a better standardization of this safety level. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping the HRH Policy and Plan in Mali
Paul, Elisabeth ULg; Samaké, Salif

Conference (2010)

Context: Deficient HRH management – especially insufficient training and motivation, and adverse distribution of qualified staff countrywide, at the expense of poor and remote areas – has been identified ... [more ▼]

Context: Deficient HRH management – especially insufficient training and motivation, and adverse distribution of qualified staff countrywide, at the expense of poor and remote areas – has been identified for over a decade as one major constraint for the implementation of Mali's national health policy. Main objective: The HRH policy aims to define a coherent framework for the ministry of health (MoH) and its partners in order to ensure the harmonious development, distribution, management and motivation of health staff so as to ultimately improve health results. The policy is translated into an operational plan dealing specifically with training, recruitment, motivation, and career management. Methodology: The HRH policy and plan were developed by a core team under the leadership of the Planning Department of the MoH, with the involvement from other departments of the MoH, the ministries in charge of finance (MoF) and civil service (MoCS), and donors. After analyzing existing studies and data, the diagnosis over the major problems to be tackled was done. This allowed identifying the main orientations of the policy, which were then translated into strategies and interventions, and then costed. Once the policy and plan have been drafted by the core team, they have been circulated to all departments and partners and discussed in several meetings with different stakeholders at central level. After integrating comments from these meetings, the MoH organized a validation workshop with very broad participation (including the operational level, private sector, and civil society) so as to ensure ownership. Final amendments were negotiated with the MoF and MoCS in order to be adopted as a national policy by the Counsel of Ministers by the end of 2009. Results: The HRH policy and plan now benefit from wide political support by major stakeholders. Yet, implementation still has been delayed because of the management modalities at operational level still need to be definitively agreed upon. Conclusion: The inclusive development process has been necessary to move on with the complex and highly sensitive issue of HRH management, and to get the support from MoF, MoSC and donors who are supposed to contribute to its financing. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping the Sixth Sense
Focant, Jean-François ULg

in The Column (2012), 8(18), 2-5

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See detailDeveloping the sixth sense of thanato-chemistry
Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULg; Perrault, Katelynn; Varlet, Vincent et al

Scientific conference (2014, November)

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See detailDeveloping tools for managing hydrogeological data in a semi-arid region: the case study of Oulmès (Morocco)
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Orban, Philippe ULg; Elbatloussi, D. et al

in GIRE3D: International Congress on Integrated Water Resources management and Challenges of the Sustainable Development (2006)

Data and information required by hydrogeological studies are various and complex such as geology, topography, climate, hydrological and hydrogeological raw or pre-processed data. All these data need to be ... [more ▼]

Data and information required by hydrogeological studies are various and complex such as geology, topography, climate, hydrological and hydrogeological raw or pre-processed data. All these data need to be managed, and this can be done in a structured database. A (GIS-managed) hydrogeological database has been developed previously by the Hydrogeology Group of the University of Liège (Gogu et al., 2001) in order to capture, store, edit, query, update and display geographically referenced hydrogeological data. The development of this geo-relational database was constrained by a maximum storage of data with a minimum data redundancy, reduction of storage memory capacity and optimum ‘retrievability’ of information for further analysis. In recent years, the use of Geographical Information System (GIS) has grown rapidly in groundwater management and research. GIS is now widely used to create digital geographic databases, to manipulate and prepare data as input for various model parameters, and to display model output. Coupling GIS with this hydrogeological database provides a powerful tool. This GIS-managed hydrogeological database has been also developed for vulnerability-assessment techniques and numerical modelling for groundwater flow and contaminant transport studies. As well as linking between database and GIS, the design of coupling database with process-based numerical models was also performed. This methodology has been applied, in a semi-arid region: the "Oulmès plateau" located in the Mid-Atlas (Morocco). This study has led to a detailed hydrogeological map at the scale of 1/25000. First, data were collected from existing databases, studies and maps as well as through new field measurements. These data came from numerous and various sources and in different formats (paper or digital diagrams, images, spreadsheets…). After validation, it has been encoded in the hydrogeological database. Because data are geo-referenced, it can be easily represented on the map within GIS-software. The hydrogeological map displays several layers of information as topography, hydrogeological units, hydrographic network, wells, piezometers, isoline of piezometric heads. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping Tourism Products and new Partnerships through Participative Action Research in Rural Cameroon
Schmitz, Serge ULg; Lekane Tsoubgou, Dieudonné

in Geographical Research (2016), 54(2), 143-152

The paper explores possible synergies between microfinance institutions and small and medium medium tourism businesses in the West Cameron Chiefdooms. Based on a research action the authors emphasise the ... [more ▼]

The paper explores possible synergies between microfinance institutions and small and medium medium tourism businesses in the West Cameron Chiefdooms. Based on a research action the authors emphasise the obstacles to the formation of partnership and describe how the researchers facilitated networking. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and aging of the Kisspeptin-GPR54 system in the mammalian brain: what are the impacts on female reproductive function?
Franceschini, Isabelle; Desroziers, Elodie ULg

in Frontiers in Neuroendocrine Science (2013)

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See detailDevelopment and analysis of low-order models of frame structures under blast loads
Hamra, Lotfi ULg

Doctoral thesis (2016)

The main aim of this thesis is to propose an easy-to-apply tool to assess the level of damage of a structure in which one compartment is subjected to blast loading. This compartment is extracted from the ... [more ▼]

The main aim of this thesis is to propose an easy-to-apply tool to assess the level of damage of a structure in which one compartment is subjected to blast loading. This compartment is extracted from the structure accounting for the interaction with the part of the structure surrounding the loaded compartment, which is assumed to be elastic. Before studying the whole frame structure, the structural elements (i.e. the beam and its adjacent columns) are firstly studied separately taking into account the lateral restraint and mass offered by the indirectly affected part (IAP) of the structure. Secondly, the dynamic behaviour of a simple compartment made of pinned members and laterally braced is investigated. The material laws are assumed to be elastic-perfectly plastic, neglecting the effect of strain rate on the yield strength. The out-of-plane instabilities of the structural members are disregarded. • To explain the context of this study + final aim of this research Two analytical models are developed to predict the dynamic response of the frame beam subjected to blast loading, including the elastic lateral restraint and inertia offered by the IAP of the structure, the development of nonlinear membrane action (P-\delta effect) and also, the interaction between bending moment and axial force in the plastic hinges. The first model is based on a single degree of freedom (SDOF model) which is the transverse mid-span deflection of the beam while the second model is a two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model which also includes the axial elongation of the beam. The accuracy of these two low-order models is assessed with finite element simulations. This validation stage shows that the proposed low-order models capture the physics of the problem in most cases of practical interest. A dimensional analysis of the problem reveals that, under the considered assumptions, four dimensionless parameters mainly influence the required ductility of the beam. Two of them are related to the behavior of the indirectly affected part (the lateral restraint and mass). Another one is related to the mechanical properties of the investigated beam (i.e. the ratio of the bending to axial resistance). The last parameter incorporates scales of the geometry and of the deformed configuration at the onset of the plastic mechanism. Concerning the columns, an analytical model is proposed to assess its dynamic response under constant axial compressive load and lateral blast loading. It accounts for large displacement (P-\delta effect), bending moment-axial force (M-N) plastic interaction as well as its interaction with the indirectly affected part (IAP) of the structure. This model is non-smooth piecewise linear and involves two degrees of freedoms (2 DOFs) in each regime of the motion of the column (related to the possibilities of development of plastic hinges). The dimensional analysis of the problem reveals that, under the considered assumptions, four dimensionless parameters mainly influence the dynamic stability of the beam-column. Two of them are related to the behavior of the indirectly affected part (the lateral restraint and mass). Another one is related to the critical load multiplier (i.e. the ratio of the axial compressive load to Euler elastic buckling resistance). The last parameter is the reduced slenderness of the beam-column. Subsequent to a parametric study, it is demonstrated that a good correlation is found between the results provided by the analytical model and a richer FEM model, despite some little discrepancies observed for some intermediate values of stiffness of the lateral restraint and lateral mass. As a possible improvement, adjustments to the analytical model are suggested. Finally, the dynamic behaviour of a simple frame under constant compressive loads and lateral blast loading is studied with a last 2-DOF analytical model. A multi-layer model of the cross-section of the beam is used to derive the bending moment-axial force (M-N) plastic interaction instead of the Lescouarc'h formula and normality rule. The coupling between the beam and the adjacent columns is ensured through appropriate boundary conditions. For the studied frame, two blast scenarios are contemplated, the first one corresponds to a quasi-static blast loading while the second one refers to a dynamic blast loading. The first case study shows that a very good agreement is achieved between the deflections predicted by the analytical and numerical models although a discrepancy is observed in the assessment of the axial force in the column due to the shape of the inertial force distribution of the beam assumed in the model. The second case study illustrates that, in both analytical and numerical models, the columns are predicted to fail by buckling due to the P-\delta effect although the axial force in the column is again inaccurately captured by the analytical model for the same reason. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and application of a microplate method to evaluate the efficacy of essential oils against Penicillium italicum Wehmer, Penicillium digitatum Sacc. and Colletotrichum musea (Berk. M.A. Curtis) Arx, three postharvest fungal pathogens of fruits
Kouassi, Kouadio Hugues Sosthène ULg; Bajji, M.; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2012), 16(3), 325-336

A microbioassay was developed for evaluating the in vitro antifungal activity of 30 preselected essential oils. A template based on 10 serial dilutions with eight replicates per dilution arranged on two ... [more ▼]

A microbioassay was developed for evaluating the in vitro antifungal activity of 30 preselected essential oils. A template based on 10 serial dilutions with eight replicates per dilution arranged on two 96-well ELISA plates was used as a reproducible and standardized design to identify the in vitro effectiveness of these essential oils against Penicillium italicum Wehmer, Penicillium digitatum Sacc. and Colletotrichum musea (Berk. M.A. Curtis) Arx, three postharvest fungal pathogens, on fruits. Growth of mycelium was monitored by measuring optical density (492 nm). Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Cinnamomum verum and Eugenia caryophyllus were found to be still active against all the three pathogens even at 100 ppm. Compared to other methods, this microbioassay proved to be a rapid, reproducible, and efficient method for testing the efficacy of essential oils that inhibit spore germination in P. italicum, P. digitatum and C. musea. The assay requires relatively small amounts of essential oils. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and application of a non-targeted extraction method for the analysis of migrating compounds from plastic baby bottles by GC-MS
Onghena, Matthias; van Hoeck, Els; Vervliet, Philippe et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2014), 31(12), 2090-2102

In 2011, the European Union prohibited the production of polycarbonate (PC) baby bottles due to the toxic effects of the PC monomer bisphenol-A. Therefore, baby bottles made of alternative materials, e.g ... [more ▼]

In 2011, the European Union prohibited the production of polycarbonate (PC) baby bottles due to the toxic effects of the PC monomer bisphenol-A. Therefore, baby bottles made of alternative materials, e.g. polypropylene (PP) or polyethersulphone (PES), are currently marketed. The principal aim of the study was the identification of major compounds migrating from baby bottles using a liquid–liquid extraction followed by GC/MS analysis. A 50% EtOH in water solution was selected as a simulant for milk. After sterilisation of the bottle, three migration experiments were performed during 2 h at 70°C. A nontargeted liquid–liquid extraction with ethyl acetate–n-hexane (1:1) was performed on the simulant samples. Identification of migrants from 24 baby bottles was done using commercially available WILEY and NIST mass spectra libraries. Differences in the migrating compounds and their intensities were observed between the different types of plastics, but also between the same polymer from a different producer. Differences in the migration patterns were perceived as well between the sterilisation and the migrations and within the different migrations. Silicone, Tritan™ and PP exhibited a wide variety of migrating compounds, whereas PES and polyamide (PA) showed a lower amount of migrants, though sometimes in relatively large concentrations (azacyclotridecan-2-one up to 250 µg kg−1 ). Alkanes (especially in PP bottles), phthalates (dibutylphthalate in one PP bottle (±40 µg kg−1 ) and one silicone bottle (±25 µg kg−1 ); diisobutylphthalate in one PP (±10 µg kg−1 ), silicone (up to ±80 µg kg−1 ); and Tritan™ bottle (±30 µg kg−1 )), antioxidants (Irgafos 168, degradation products of Irganox 1010 and Irganox 1076), etc. were detected for PP, silicone and Tritan™ bottles. Although the concentrations were relatively low, some compounds not authorised by European Union Regulation No. 10/2011, such as 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol (10–100 µg kg−1 ) or 2-butoxyethyl acetate (about 300 µg kg−1 ) were detected. Migrating chemicals were identified as confirmed (using a standard) or as tentative (further confirmation required). [less ▲]

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