Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
See detailLa emocion
Richelle, Marc ULg

in Manuila, Alexandre (Ed.) Enciclopedia Salvat de la Salud (1981)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEMOCOMP! A customer based scale for measuring emotional competences in service employees
Delcourt, Cécile ULg; Van Riel, Allard ULg; van Birgelen, Marcel et al

E-print/Working paper (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULg)
See detailEMODNET Chemical Data Products Experts Workshop
Troupin, Charles ULg

Scientific conference (2010, September 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotion and false memories: affective valence influences participant’s susceptibility to false memories and illusory recollection.
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Emotion (2010), 10(5), 627-639

This study examined the influence of emotional valence on the production of DRM false memories (Roediger & McDermott, 1995). Participants were presented with neutral, positive or negative DRM lists for a ... [more ▼]

This study examined the influence of emotional valence on the production of DRM false memories (Roediger & McDermott, 1995). Participants were presented with neutral, positive or negative DRM lists for a later recognition (Experiment 1) or recall (Experiment 2) test. In both experiments, confidence and recollective experience (i.e., “Remember-Know” judgements; Tulving, 1985) were also assessed. Results consistently showed that, compared with neutral lists, affective lists induced more false recognition and recall of non presented critical lures. Moreover, although confidence ratings did not differ between the false remembering from the different kinds of lists, “Remember” responses were more often associated with negative than positive and neutral false remembering of the critical lures. In contrast, positive false remembering of the critical lures was more often associated with “Know” responses. These results are discussed in light of the Paradoxical Negative Emotion (PNE) hypothesis (Porter et al., 2008). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 131 (4 ULg)
See detailEmotion et psychiatrie, ou les chances de l'homme selon Francis Jeanson
Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2011, June 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotion et réalité chez Sartre. Remarques à propos d'une anthropologie philosophique originale
Cormann, Grégory ULg

in Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique (2012), 8(1), 286-302

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (11 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'émotion fondamentale
Caeymaex, Florence ULg; Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2012, June 22)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (7 ULg)
See detailEmotion, corps et conscience magique chez Sartre
Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2011, April 06)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotion, faux souvenirs DRM et vieillissement normal
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

Poster (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 125 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotion, faux souvenirs et vieillissement normal.
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in société française de psychologie: cognition, émotion et société - 52eme congrès (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 135 (3 ULg)
See detailEmotion, mort et conscience. Le premier Sartre et Freud
Cormann, Grégory ULg

Conference (2013, May 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional aspects of mental time travel
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2007), 30

We consider three possible reasons why humans might accord a privileged status to emotional information when mentally traveling backward or forward in time. First, mental simulation of emotional ... [more ▼]

We consider three possible reasons why humans might accord a privileged status to emotional information when mentally traveling backward or forward in time. First, mental simulation of emotional situations helps one to make adaptive decisions. Second, it can serve an emotion regulation function. Third, it helps people to construct and maintain a positive view of the self. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional competencies of the sport coach: A qualitative approach within a physical activity programme for multiple sclerosis patients.
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Defossa, Clément; Cloes, Marc ULg

in Sanchez Molina, J. A.; Carballo, O.; Gonzalez Valeiro, M. A. (Eds.) Actas del Congreso Internacional de la AIESEP 2010 « Place and role of physical educators in promoting an active lifestyle » (2011)

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by functional impairments (fatigue, motor weakness, spasticity, poor balance) and limitations in social functioning. Accordingly, persons with MS are more affected ... [more ▼]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by functional impairments (fatigue, motor weakness, spasticity, poor balance) and limitations in social functioning. Accordingly, persons with MS are more affected by sedentarity and not enough aware of their physical capacities. Finally, those behaviours lead to physical deconditioning and general poor health in this population. To encourage physical activity with MS people, a specific coaching programme whereby MS patient are individually supported by a sport coach has been launched at the University Hospital Center of Liège. In this context this study aimed to (1) describe the intervention of the coach ;(2) link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach ; (3) propose recommendations to improve MS patient’s physical activity management. Behaviors, attitudes, values, representations and emotional competencies of seven coaches were analyzed using both visible (audio and video recording) and invisible (questionnaires and interviews) data. Results show that coaching efficacy with MS patient implies a high support and cooperation level of the coach and a highly specific approach characterized by a systematic appraisal of patient’s behaviors revealing his current psychological and physical state. Recommendations for the coach education with an emphasis on social and emotional skills are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional competencies of the sport coach: A qualitative approach within a physical activity programme for multiple sclerosis patients. A case study
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Defossa, Clément; Cloes, Marc ULg

Poster (2010, October)

The main purposes of this study were to describe the intervention and to link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach in a physical activity programme for MS patients. We wanted also to close ... [more ▼]

The main purposes of this study were to describe the intervention and to link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach in a physical activity programme for MS patients. We wanted also to close this study proposing recommendations to improve MS patient physical activity management. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional facial expression decoding in children high in social anxiety
Blairy, Sylvie ULg; Massin, Anne

Poster (2007, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional Facial Expression Recognition and Expressivity in Type I and Type II Alcohol Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; El Hawa, Maya; Duchateau et al

in Journal of Nonverbal Behavior (2014), 38(1), 89-105

Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present ... [more ▼]

Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present study aimed to explore emotional facial expression (EFE) recognition and posed and spontaneous EFE expressivity in male ADs divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology and the impact of their interpersonal relationship quality on the potential nonverbal deficits. Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants took part in an EFE recognition task and an EFE expressivity task that considered personal emotional events (spontaneous expressivity) and EFE in response to a photo or word cue (posed expressivity). Coding was based on judges’ ratings of participants’ emotional facial expressions. Participants additionally completed a questionnaire on interpersonal relationship quality. Results: No difference between the three groups emerged in the EFE recognition task. Type II ADs showed heightened deficits compared with type I ADs in EFE expressivity: Judges perceived less accurate posed EFE in response to a cue word and less intense and positive spontaneous EFE in type II ADs compared to control participants. In addition, type II ADs reported more relationship difficulties compared to both type I ADs and control participants. These interpersonal relationship difficulties were related to some of the EFE expressivity deficits of AD-IIs. Conclusions: This study underlines the important differences between the interpersonal functioning of AD subtypes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (9 ULg)