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See detailDépression et maladies coronariennes: quand les émotions nous brisent le coeur...
Massart, Nicolas ULg; Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2005), 60(12), 931-8

Depression and cardiovascular diseases represent a major public health problem worldwide. Recent studies have shown that depression is a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) in ... [more ▼]

Depression and cardiovascular diseases represent a major public health problem worldwide. Recent studies have shown that depression is a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) in healthy people and also increases morbidity and mortality in depressed patients with CAD. Others studies have shown that selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs) constitute a safe and effective treatment for depressed patients with heart disease. There are also data suggesting that treating depression with SSRIs has a protective role in myocardial infarction and may improve outcomes, including mortality. [less ▲]

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See detailDépression et neuroplasticité.
Pitchot, William ULg; Polis, Marie-Hélène ULg; Belachew, Shibeshih ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

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See detailDépression et suicide : Aspects biologiques
ANSSEAU, Marc ULg; PITCHOT, William ULg

in Neuro-psy (1998)

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See detailDepression in tension-type headache sufferers: bystander or villain?
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Pain (2004), 111(3), 225-225

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See detailDepression in Women and in Men: Differences on Behavioral Avoidance and on Behavioral Activation
Wagener, Aurélie ULg; Baeyens, Céline; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2015, August 06)

Depression is a well-known disorder characterized by e.g. sadness, loss of interest and pleasure, feelings of guilt or worthlessness. Depression is also characterized by a decrease of the level of ... [more ▼]

Depression is a well-known disorder characterized by e.g. sadness, loss of interest and pleasure, feelings of guilt or worthlessness. Depression is also characterized by a decrease of the level of engagement in activities also conceptualized as behavioral avoidance. Indeed, depressed patients less and less engage themselves in pleasurable activities (e.g. they spend more and more time in their bed, see their friends more rarely). Reciprocally, this decrease of the level of engagement in activities reinforces and maintains depressive symptoms. This relationship between depression and a low level of engagement in activities is well-established in the scientific literature but no study has, until now, discussed the reasons of this decrease of engagement in activities. According to theoretical models of depression (Beck, 2008; Lewinsohn, 1985; Watkins, 2009), five sets of psychological processes (PP) are involved in depressive symptomatology: negative repetitive thoughts, maladaptive emotion regulation strategies, low environmental rewards, negative self-image and inhibition. We hypothesize that these PP could be considered as explaining factors of the behavioral avoidance. Furthermore, we hypothesize that other PP could be considered as explaining factors of the behavioral activation (adaptive emotion regulation strategies, high environmental rewards, positive self-image, approach and high self-clarity). Then, our aim is to assess the links between behavioral avoidance as well as activation and the PP mentioned above. In order to reach this objective, we developed a model of these links based on the psychological model of mental ill-health of Kinderman (2005, 2013). According to this model, biological, social and circumstantial factors lead to mental disorders through their conjoint effects on psychological processes. Furthermore, because depression is different in women and in men, we assessed the adequacy of our model according to the sex. Clinical and community adults completed an online survey assessing the psychological processes mentioned above, avoidance and activation. Since several questionnaires were used to assess each PP, factorial scores were computed for each one. Preliminary analyses (confirmatory factor analyses) were realized with a sample of 393 women and 139 men. The results revealed differences between men and women. For women, on the one hand, low levels of environmental rewards, maladaptive emotion regulation strategies and negative repetitive thoughts are linked to behavioral avoidance, and on the other hand, high levels of environmental rewards and positive self-image are linked to behavioral activation. For men, on the one hand, negative self-image, maladaptive emotion regulation strategies and low environmental rewards are linked to behavioral avoidance, and, on the other hand, high levels of environmental rewards and positive self-image are linked to behavioral activation. The final results will be presented during the convention, as data-collection is on-going and will end in May 2015. Clinical implications of these results will also be discussed such as the relevance of working on the levels of environmental rewards. [less ▲]

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See detailDepression is a heterogeneous condition: A cluster-analysis approach
Wagener, Aurélie ULg; Baeyens, Céline; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

Poster (2017, March 24)

The heterogeneity of depression (i.e., symptomatology profiles, treatment responsiveness) is more and more evidenced. From a clinical perspective, having a clearer overview of the symptoms’ heterogeneity ... [more ▼]

The heterogeneity of depression (i.e., symptomatology profiles, treatment responsiveness) is more and more evidenced. From a clinical perspective, having a clearer overview of the symptoms’ heterogeneity of depression will help (1) to deeper understand its underlined psychological processes and (2) to tailor clinical treatments (i.e., psychological interventions and/or antidepressant medications). In order to so, an effort to determine subtypes of depression has been developed through a cluster-analysis approach. Andreasen et al. (1980) identified three clusters of depressed patients based on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia; Schacht et al. (2014) evidenced five clusters based on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (i.e., lack of insight, sleep/sexual/somatic, typical MDD, gastrointestinal/weight loss, mild MDD); Hybels et al. (2012) found three clusters of depressive patients based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale in community seniors; and Guidi et al. (2011) found two clusters of depressives in medically ill patients based on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (i.e., depressed somatizers, irritable/anxious depression). The current study aims at replicating and extending these previous findings in adults presenting depressive symptoms through a cluster-analysis approach. Unlike previous studies, the highlighting of the clusters will be based on the most frequently used assessment of depression, the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II). Further, the definition of the clusters will be based on the presence of the depressive symptoms rather than on their severity because symptoms’ severity on the BDI-II can be misrepresentative of the phenomenology of depressive symptoms’ clusters. A sample of 619 adults from community and mental healthcare centers has been recruited. Inclusion criteria were as follows: being a French-speaking adult aged between 18 and 60 years and presenting at least five symptoms on the BDI-II, irrespective of their severity. Data grouping was achieved through a combination of hierarchical (Ward’s method with squared Euclidian distance measurement) and nonhierarchical procedures (K-means cluster analysis), as recommended by recent theoretical trends. A six-cluster solution was evidenced: heavy sleepers (high levels of tiredness, loss of energy and increase of sleep), cognitive depressives (high levels of pessimism, past failures, guilty feelings, self-dislike and worthlessness), affective-somatic depressives (high levels of affective symptoms - loss of interest and pleasure - and somatic symptoms - increase of appetite and sleep, irritability), mild depressives (mild levels of all symptoms), sleepless depressives (high levels of decrease of sleep and tiredness), typical depressives (high levels of all symptoms). Results evidenced the heterogeneity of depressive symptoms, as six different clusters of depressive adults have been found. Two of the clusters identified in the current study are similar to two clusters identified by Schacht et al. (2014) (sleepless depressives are similar to the cluster “sleep/sexual/somatic” because their profile are highly characterized by symptoms related to insomnia and tiredness; mild depressives are similar to the cluster “mild MDD/symptoms” because their profile are characterized by low to average levels on all symptoms). The take-home message of this study is that depression is a heterogeneous condition. Consequently, it is necessary to consider this heterogeneity in order to tailor the psychological intervention. [less ▲]

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See detailDépression majeure et prescription personnalisée
PITCHOT, William ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2015)

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See detailla dépression maternelle en post-partum: actualisation et points pratiques
Battisti, Oreste ULg; Emonts, Patrick ULg

in colloque de l'EPU-Ulg (2012, May)

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See detailLa dépression résistante : Définition et diagnostic
PITCHOT, William ULg; SOUERY, D.; Ansseau, Marc ULg

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2011), 111(4), 13-19

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See detailLa dépression résistante : Définition et diagnostique
PITCHOT, William ULg; SCANTAMBURLO, Gabrielle ULg; ANSSEAU, Marc ULg

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2011)

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See detailDépression saisonnière. mensuel de l’Université de Liège, Liège, Belgique.
Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg

Article for general public (2010)

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See detailDépression unipolaire et personnalité prémorbide : version francophone du Criteria for Typus Melancholicus
Englebert, Jérôme ULg; Stanghellini, Giovanni; Calderazzo, Déborah et al

in Psychologie Française (in press)

The Typus Melancholicus (TM) is a pre-melancholic personality structure, defined by Tellenbach and Kraus and characterized by the orderliness, conscientiousness, norm orientation and intolerance of ... [more ▼]

The Typus Melancholicus (TM) is a pre-melancholic personality structure, defined by Tellenbach and Kraus and characterized by the orderliness, conscientiousness, norm orientation and intolerance of ambiguity. This study aims to discriminate the existence of a subgroup TM, among a unipolar depressive population. In order to prove the existence of this subgroup, we translated and administrated the Criteria for Typus Melancholicus (CTM) to a sample of 20 unipolar patients and 20 control participants. The research hypothesis was to find a similar proportion to the one observed in the literature (50% of TM in the unipolar sample). The results demonstrate, as expected, that half of the unipolar sample belongs to a homogeneous subgroup that displays the TM features. Furthermore, no control subjects displays the TM features. Those results suggest that the TM features design a coherent and typical psychopathological structure that can be found in an important proportion of unipolar depressive population. Our study identifies and confirms the existence of a distinct heterogeneity (TM/noTM) inside the unipolar group. This distinction opens the door to some important perspectives in terms of therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailDépression, anxiété, agressivité, impulsivité et comportement suicidaire
PAQUAY, Catherine ULg; PITCHOT, William ULg; Reggers, Jean et al

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2003), 103

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See detailDepression, anxiety, and multicultural counselling
Broonen, Jean-Paul ULg

in Aungier, C. (Ed.) Proceedings of the VIth Congress of the European Forum for Students Guidance : Understanding complexity, respecting diversity, L'Aquila, May 28-31 (1997)

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See detailDépression, niveau d'engagement dans des activités et processus psychologiques : Nouvel axe de lecture et nouveaux outils d'évaluation
Wagener, Aurélie ULg

Conference (2014, October 17)

Cet atelier aura pour objectif de présenter un modèle théorique, testé auprès de 500 personnes, des liens entre la dépression, le niveau d’engagement dans des activités et différentes familles de ... [more ▼]

Cet atelier aura pour objectif de présenter un modèle théorique, testé auprès de 500 personnes, des liens entre la dépression, le niveau d’engagement dans des activités et différentes familles de processus psychologiques (image de soi, pensées négatives répétitives, évitement expérientiel, satisfaction environnementale, régulation émotionnelle et tendance à l’approche). Plus précisément, nous menons actuellement une étude dont les résultats nous permettront d’identifier les processus psychologiques médiateurs de la relation entre la dépression et le niveau d’engagement dans des activités. Ces processus psychologiques médiateurs pourront donc devenir des cibles précises et identifiées du traitement psychothérapeutique. Pour mener à bien cette étude, nous avons réalisé une revue de la littérature des outils évaluant spécifiquement ces processus psychologiques. Certains questionnaires ont été traduits de l’Anglais au Français et sont en cours de validation. L’ensemble des échelles utilisées, leur utilité et leur cotation, seront présentées lors de l’atelier. Elles seront également mises à disposition des cliniciens intéressés. Une discussion concernant les patients avec lesquels les utiliser sera également proposée. [less ▲]

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See detailDépression: Intérêt de la variation contingente négative
Papart, Patrick ULg

in Dialogue/Depression (1994)

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See detailDepressive symptomatology and the influence of the behavioral avoidance and activation: A gender-specific investigation
Wagener, Aurélie ULg; Baeyens, Céline; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2016), 193

BACKGROUNG: Depression is a highly prevalent disorder which is usually considered as differentially experienced depending on gender. Behavioral theories of depression pinpoint the importance of the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUNG: Depression is a highly prevalent disorder which is usually considered as differentially experienced depending on gender. Behavioral theories of depression pinpoint the importance of the behavioral avoidance in the maintenance of depression. However, little is known about the specific impact of the behavioral avoidance and activation on each depressive symptom as well as on gender differences on the behavioral features of depression. METHODS: This study’s aim was two-fold: (1) to assess the presence of gender differences on the BDI-II; (2) to investigate the respective predictive value of behavioral avoidance and of behavioral activation on each depressive symptom assessed by the BDI-II depending on gender. Community adults and adults attending mental healthcare composed the sample. RESULTS: Results showed differences in symptomatology profiles depending on gender (e.g. higher scores of sadness, self-criticalness in women, higher scores of past failure and loss of pleasure in men). Behavioral avoidance positively predicted almost all depressive symptoms in women and in men while behavioral activation negatively predicted almost all symptoms in both gender. Nevertheless, the strengths of these relationships were different for some symptoms (e.g. pessimism). LIMITATIONS: The use of self-report instruments; the lack of assessment of causal or precipitating factors of the depressive symptomatology; the higher number of women in the sample. CONCLUSIONS: Results are discussed with respect to previous findings and present clinical implications: (1) to underline the relevance of the combination of gender-specific assessment tools; (2) to highlight the need of tailored psychological intervention. [less ▲]

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See detailDepressive vulnerability is not an independent risk factor for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Paul, I. et al

in Maturitas (1999), 33(2), 133-7

Major depression has been repeatedly but not consistently reported to be associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and to an increased risk for fracture in women. We have investigated, in healthy ... [more ▼]

Major depression has been repeatedly but not consistently reported to be associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and to an increased risk for fracture in women. We have investigated, in healthy postmenopausal women, whether depressive symptomatology, assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), was associated to a significant decrease in BMD, hence supporting the hypothesis of an independent pathogenetic link between the two disorders. We investigated 121 postmenopausal women, aged 48-77 years, spontaneously attending a screening visit for osteoporosis in an outpatient facility. BMD of the spine and the non-dominant hip (total and neck areas) were measured by Dual Energy X-Ray absorptiometry. All subjects completed to the 'General Health Questionnaire' translated and validated in French. No significant correlations were observed between the GHQ score and BMD of the spine (P = 0.54), the total hip area (P = 0.65), or the femoral neck area (P = 0.65). No differences in terms of spinal or femoral BMD were observed between women with GHQ score < 5 or > or = 5. When comparing values of BMD between women within the upper and the lower quartiles for GHQ score, no difference was observed for spine (P = 0.69), total hip (P = 0.80), or femoral neck (P = 0.93). Similarly, GHQ scores were not significantly different when comparing women in the upper and lower quartiles of BMD distribution at the spine or the hip. In conclusion, notwithstanding the clinical pattern of postmenopausal osteoporosis can lead to depression and, on the other hand, hormonal and behavioral disturbances reported in depression might be enhancing factors for accelerated bone loss, our present results do not support the hypothesis that otherwise healthy postmenopausal women with increased depressive complaints are also more prone to exhibit osteoporotic fractures. [less ▲]

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