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See detailEfficacy and safety of a third anti-TNF monoclonal antibody in Crohn's disease after failure of two other anti-TNF.
Allez, Matthieu; Vermeire, Severine; Mozziconacci, Nicolas et al

in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2009)

Adalimumab (ADA) and certolizumab pegol (CZP) have demonstrated efficacy in Crohn's disease (CD) patients previously treated with infliximab (IFX). Aim: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of a third ... [more ▼]

Adalimumab (ADA) and certolizumab pegol (CZP) have demonstrated efficacy in Crohn's disease (CD) patients previously treated with infliximab (IFX). Aim: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of a third anti-TNF in CD after failure of and/or intolerance to two different anti-TNF. Methods: CD patients who received ADA or CZP after loss of response and/or intolerance to two anti-TNF were included in this retrospective study. Data were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Clinical response, duration, safety and reasons for discontinuation were assessed. Results: Sixty-seven patients treated with CZP (n=40) or ADA (n=27) were included. A clinical response was observed in 41 (61%) at week 6 and 34 patients (51%) at week 20. The probability of remaining under treatment at 3 months, 6 months and 9 months was 68%, 60% and 45%, respectively. At the end of follow-up, the third anti-TNF had been stopped in 36 patients for intolerance (n=13), or failure (n=23). Two deaths were observed. Conclusion: Treatment, with a third anti-TNF (CZP or ADA) agent, of CD patients who have experienced loss of response and/or intolerance to two anti-TNF antibodies, has favorable short- and long-term efficacy and is an option to be considered in patients with no other therapeutic options. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of adalimumab as monotherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis for whom previous disease modifying antirheumatic drug treatment has failed
van de Putte, B. A.; Atkins, C.; Malaise, Michel ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2004), 63(5), 508-516

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of monotherapy with adalimumab in patients with RA for whom previous DMARD treatment has failed. Methods: In a 26 week, double blind, placebo controlled ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of monotherapy with adalimumab in patients with RA for whom previous DMARD treatment has failed. Methods: In a 26 week, double blind, placebo controlled, phase III trial, 544 patients with RA were randomised to monotherapy with adalimumab 20 mg every other week, 20 mg weekly, 40 mg every other week, 40 mg weekly, or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was greater than or equal to 20% improvement in the ACR core criteria (ACR20 response). Secondary efficacy end points included ACR50, ACR70, EULAR responses, and the Disability Index of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ DI). Results: After 26 weeks, patients treated with adalimumab 20 mg every other week, 20 mg weekly, 40 mg every other week, and 40 mg weekly had significantly better response rates than those treated with placebo: ACR20 (35.8%, 39.3%, 46.0%, 53.4%, respectively v 19.1%; pless than or equal to 0.01); ACR50 (18.9%, 20.5%, 22.1%, 35.0% v 8.2%; pless than or equal to 0.05); ACR70 (8.5%, 9.8%, 12.4%, 18.4% v 1.8%; pless than or equal to 0.05). Moderate EULAR response rates were significantly greater with adalimumab than with placebo (41.5%, 48.2%, 55.8%, 63.1% v 26.4%; pless than or equal to 0.05). Patients treated with adalimumab achieved better improvements in mean HAQ DI than those receiving placebo (-0.29, -0.39, -0.38, -0.49 v -0.07; pless than or equal to 0.01). No significant differences were found between adalimumab and placebo treated patients for serious adverse events, serious infections, or malignancies. Injection site reaction occurred in 10.6% and 0.9% of adalimumab and placebo treated patients, respectively (pless than or equal to 0.05). Conclusion: Among patients with RA for whom previous DMARD treatment had failed, adalimumab monotherapy achieved significant, rapid, and sustained improvements in disease activity and improved physical function and was safe and well tolerated. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of avocado soybean unsaponifiable (ASU)at two different daily doses in treatment of symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee (KOA)
Appelboom, T; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Schuermans, J et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (1999), 7(SA), 117

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See detailEfficacy and safety of currently marketed anti-osteoporosis medications
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; NEUPREZ, Audrey ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in Best Practice & Research. Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (2014), 28

During the past 2 decades, many interventions were proven effective in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The objective of an anti-osteoporosis treatment is to reduce fracture rates, ideally ... [more ▼]

During the past 2 decades, many interventions were proven effective in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The objective of an anti-osteoporosis treatment is to reduce fracture rates, ideally at all skeletal sites (i.e. spine, hip, and other non-spine). The armamentarium against osteoporosis includes anti-resorptive agents (i.e. bisphosphonates, selective estrogen receptor modulators and denosumab), bone-forming agents (i.e. peptides from the parathyroid hormone family) and one agent with a dual mechanism of action (i.e. strontium ranelate). All these medications combine anti-fracture efficacy with a reasonable benefit/risk profile. However, the choice of a particular chemical entity, in one individual patient is based on the knowledge and expertise of the physician. Prioritization of drugs should be based on the individual profile of the patient, the severity of osteoporosis and the specific contraindications, warnings and precautions of use of the various available medications. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and Safety of Drugs for Paget's Disease of Bone
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Lecart, M. P.

in BONE (1995), 17(5 Suppl), 485-488

Paget's disease of bone is characterized by an anarchic bone turnover starting with excessive resorption caused by structural and functional abnormalities involving osteoclasts. Calcitonin and ... [more ▼]

Paget's disease of bone is characterized by an anarchic bone turnover starting with excessive resorption caused by structural and functional abnormalities involving osteoclasts. Calcitonin and bisphosphonates are now considered as the main therapeutic approaches for this disease. Daily parenteral administration of calcitonin to patients with Paget's disease of bone results in a significant fall in serum alkaline phosphatase and urinary hydroxyproline levels. This treatment has also been reported to be effective in relieving clinical symptoms of the disease, mainly bone pain. The drawbacks of injectable calcitonin have stimulated interest in alternative routes of delivery. Substantial evidence of calcitonin bioavailability and bioefficacy equivalent to those of parenteral administration is currently available for only two alternative routes: nasal spray and rectal suppository. Since many results have been published showing a dramatic effect of several bisphosphonates in Paget's disease of bone, nasal and rectal calcitonin are no longer considered as the treatments of choice in this condition. A major advantage of the use of bisphosphonates over calcitonin in Paget's disease is that biochemical and histologic suppression of disease activity may persist for many years after the cessation of treatment. Oral etidronate and intravenous pamidronate have been extensively used and have provided satisfactory benefits to the patient. Since the risk/benefit ratio of alendronate does not appear to be completely positive, it is likely that the future of treatment of Paget's disease of bone will be based on the oral formulation of the new bisphosphonates, including tiludronate, risedronate or dimethyl-pamidronate. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of etravirine in treatment-experienced, HIV-1 patients: pooled 48 week analysis of two randomized, controlled trials.
Katlama, Christine; Haubrich, Richard; Lalezari, Jacob et al

in AIDS (2009), 23(17), 2289-300

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy, safety and virologic resistance profile of etravirine (TMC125), a next-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, over 48 weeks in treatment-experienced ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy, safety and virologic resistance profile of etravirine (TMC125), a next-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, over 48 weeks in treatment-experienced adults infected with HIV-1 strains resistant to a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and other antiretrovirals. DESIGN: DUET-1 (NCT00254046) and DUET-2 (NCT00255099) are two identically designed, randomized, double-blind phase III trials. METHODS: Patients received twice-daily etravirine 200 mg or placebo, each plus a background regimen of darunavir/ritonavir, investigator-selected nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors and optional enfuvirtide. Eligible patients had documented nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance, at least three primary protease inhibitor mutations at screening and were on a stable but virologically failing regimen for at least 8 weeks, with plasma viral load more than 5000 copies/ml. Pooled 48-week data from the two trials are presented. RESULTS: Patients (1203) were randomized and treated (n = 599, etravirine; n = 604, placebo). Significantly more patients in the etravirine than in the placebo group achieved viral load less than 50 copies/ml at week 48 (61 vs. 40%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer patients in the etravirine group experienced at least one confirmed or probable AIDS-defining illness/death (6 vs. 10%; P = 0.0408). Safety and tolerability in the etravirine group was comparable to the placebo group. Rash was the only adverse event to occur at a significantly higher incidence in the etravirine group (19 vs. 11%, respectively, P < 0.0001), occurring primarily in the second week of treatment. CONCLUSION: At 48 weeks, treatment-experienced patients receiving etravirine plus background regimen had statistically superior and durable virologic responses (viral load less than 50 copies/ml) than those receiving placebo plus background regimen, with comparable tolerability and no new safety signals reported since week 24. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of Jentadueto(R) (linagliptin plus metformin).
SCHEEN, André ULg

in Expert Opinion on Drug Safety (2013), 12(2), 275-89

INTRODUCTION: Metformin is the first-choice drug in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, most patients require a combined therapy to reach and/or maintain targets of glucose control. Dipeptidyl ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Metformin is the first-choice drug in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, most patients require a combined therapy to reach and/or maintain targets of glucose control. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors offer new options for combined therapy with metformin. Linagliptin shares a similar pharmacodynamic (PD) profile with other gliptins, but has a unique pharmacokinetic (PK) profile characterized by negligible renal excretion. AREAS COVERED: An extensive literature search was performed to analyze the potential PK/PD interactions between linagliptin and metformin. They are not prone to PK drug-drug interactions. The two compounds may be administered together, either separately or using a fixed-dose combination (FDC) as shown by bioequivalence studies. The addition of linagliptin in patients not well controlled with metformin alone has proven its efficacy in improving glucose levels with a good safety profile. Initial co-administration of linagliptin plus metformin improves glucose control more potently than either compound separately, without hypoglycemia, weight gain or increased metformin-related gastrointestinal side effects. EXPERT OPINION: The linagliptin plus metformin combination may offer some advantages over the classical sulfonylurea-metformin combination. Even if linagliptin is safe in patients with renal impairment, the use of metformin (and thus of the linagliptin plus metformin FDC) is still controversial in this population. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of maribavir dosed at 100 mg orally twice daily for the prevention of cytomegalovirus disease in liver transplant recipients: a randomized, double-blind, multicenter controlled trial.
Winston, D. J.; Saliba, F.; Blumberg, E. et al

in American Journal of Transplantation (2012), 12(11), 3021-30

Maribavir is an oral benzimidazole riboside with potent in vitro activity against cytomegalovirus (CMV), including some CMV strains resistant to ganciclovir. In a randomized, double-blind, multicenter ... [more ▼]

Maribavir is an oral benzimidazole riboside with potent in vitro activity against cytomegalovirus (CMV), including some CMV strains resistant to ganciclovir. In a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, the efficacy and safety of prophylactic oral maribavir (100 mg twice daily) for prevention of CMV disease were compared with oral ganciclovir (1000 mg three times daily) in 303 CMV-seronegative liver transplant recipients with CMV-seropositive donors (147 maribavir; 156 ganciclovir). Patients received study drug for up to 14 weeks and were monitored for CMV infection by blood surveillance tests and also for the development of CMV disease. The primary endpoint was Endpoint Committee (EC)-confirmed CMV disease within 6 months of transplantation. In a modified intent-to-treat analysis, the noninferiority of maribavir compared to oral ganciclovir for prevention of CMV disease was not established (12% with maribavir vs. 8% with ganciclovir: event rate difference of 0.041; 95% CI: -0.038, 0.119). Furthermore, significantly fewer ganciclovir patients had EC-confirmed CMV disease or CMV infection by pp65 antigenemia or CMV DNA PCR compared to maribavir patients at both 100 days (20% vs. 60%; p < 0.0001) and at 6 months (53% vs. 72%; p = 0.0053) after transplantation. Graft rejection, patient survival, and non-CMV infections were similar for maribavir and ganciclovir patients. Maribavir was well-tolerated and associated with fewer hematological adverse events than oral ganciclovir. At a dose of 100 mg twice daily, maribavir is safe but not adequate for prevention of CMV disease in liver transplant recipients at high risk for CMV disease. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of monofluorophosphate and calcium in postmenopausal osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Meurmans, L et al

in Revista Espanola de Reumatologia : Organo Oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Reumatologia (1993), 20(S1), 186

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See detailEfficacy and safety of oral strontium ranelate for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: rationale and design of randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
Cooper, Cyrus; REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, Roland et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2012), 28(2), 231-9

Abstract Objective: The osteoporosis drug strontium ranelate dissociates bone remodelling processes. It also inhibits subchondral bone resorption and stimulates cartilage matrix formation in vitro ... [more ▼]

Abstract Objective: The osteoporosis drug strontium ranelate dissociates bone remodelling processes. It also inhibits subchondral bone resorption and stimulates cartilage matrix formation in vitro. Exploratory studies in the osteoporosis trials report that strontium ranelate reduces biomarkers of cartilage degradation, and attenuates the progression and clinical symptoms of spinal osteoarthritis, suggesting symptom- and structure-modifying activity in osteoarthritis. We describe the rationale and design of a randomised trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in knee osteoarthritis. Research design, methods, and results: This double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (98 centres, 18 countries) includes ambulatory Caucasian men and women aged >/=50 years with primary knee osteoarthritis of the medial tibiofemoral compartment (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3), joint space width (JSW) 2.5 to 5 mm, and knee pain on most days in the previous month (intensity >/=40 mm on a visual analogue scale). Patients are randomly allocated to three groups (strontium ranelate 1 or 2 g/day, or placebo). Follow-up is expected to last 3 years. The primary endpoint is radiographic change in JSW from baseline in each group versus placebo. The main clinical secondary endpoint is WOMAC score at the knee. Safety is assessed at every visit. It is estimated that 1600 patients are required to establish statistical significance with power >90% (0.2 mm +/- 10% between-group difference in change in JSW over 3 years). Recruitment started in April 2006. The results are expected in spring 2012. Clinical trial registration: The trial is registered on www.controlled-trials.com (number ISRCTN41323372). Conclusions: This randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled study will establish the potential of strontium ranelate in improving structure and symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of piroxicam revisited. A global meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials.
Richy, F.; Scarpignato, C.; Lanas, A. et al

in Pharmacological Research (2009), 60

BACKGROUND: The relative efficacy/safety profiles of traditional (non-selective) NSAIDs (t-NSAIDs) have been repeatedly challenged. To better understand the efficacy and safety profile of piroxicam, a ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The relative efficacy/safety profiles of traditional (non-selective) NSAIDs (t-NSAIDs) have been repeatedly challenged. To better understand the efficacy and safety profile of piroxicam, a widely used NSAID, a meta-analysis of comparative RCTs was carried out according to the QUOROM guidance. METHODS: A systematic comprehensive research (years 1980-2006) of any comparative randomised controlled trial (of over 7-day duration) with piroxicam for the treatment of osteoarticular conditions was conducted. Conservative analyses were stratified by comparator, outcome, indication, duration, and doses. Publication bias and robustness were exhaustively investigated. RESULTS: Seventy-five comparative trials were ultimately included for analyses. Regarding global efficacy, piroxicam was more effective than naproxen [OR=1.37 (1.05; 1.77)] and nabumetone [OR=1.72 (1.26; 2.34)], while equivalent to other NSAIDS [OR=1.06 (0.96; 1.18)]. For pain and articular swelling, piroxicam was statistically equivalent to all other NSAIDs. For mobility, piroxicam appeared to be more effective than indomethacin, while equivalent to all other NSAIDs. Piroxicam was globally safer than other NSAIDs OR=0.84 [0.73; 0.96], notably indomethacin [OR=0.53 (0.43; 0.64], naproxen [OR=0.75 (0.65; 0.85)] and salicylates [OR=0.36 (0.17; 0.75)]. From a global GI safety point of view, piroxicam was better tolerated than indomethacin [OR=0.46 (0.36; 0.58)], naproxen [OR=0.66 (0.53; 0.83)] and salicylates [OR=0.45 (0.27; 0.78)] while less tolerated when compared to meloxicam [OR=1.49 (1.05; 2.13)]. Major GI effects were comparable among piroxicam users as in comparator drugs users [OR=1.33 (0.96; 1.84)], except for meloxicam [OR=2.37 (1.13; 4.97)]. The skin safety of piroxicam was statistically comparable to those of comparators [OR=1.01 (0.68; 1.51)]. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis of RCTs support a similar to more favourable efficacy/safety profile of piroxicam as compared to other t-NSAIDs. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of rimonabant for improvement of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight/obese patients: pooled 1-year data from the Rimonabant in Obesity (RIO) program.
Van Gaal, Luc; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Despres, Jean-Pierre et al

in Diabetes Care (2008), 31 Suppl 2

OBJECTIVE: To better define the efficacy and safety of rimonabant, the first selective cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor antagonist, in a large population of overweight and obese patients using pooled ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To better define the efficacy and safety of rimonabant, the first selective cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor antagonist, in a large population of overweight and obese patients using pooled efficacy data from three Phase III nondiabetes Rimonabant in Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders (RIO) studies, selected efficacy data from the RIO-Diabetes study, and pooled safety data for all four RIO studies. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The RIO studies enrolled patients who were either overweight (BMI >27 kg/m(2)) with at least one comorbidity (i.e., hypertension, dyslipidemia, or, for RIO-Diabetes, type 2 diabetes) or obese. All patients received daily treatment with rimonabant (5 or 20 mg) or placebo for 1 year plus a hypocaloric diet (600 kcal/day deficit) and advice on increased physical activity. RIO-Europe (n = 1,508), RIO-North America (n = 3,045), and RIO-Lipids (n = 1,036) excluded patients with type 2 diabetes; untreated dyslipidemia was an entry requirement for RIO-Lipids. RIO-Diabetes (n = 1,047) required the presence of type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by sulfonylurea or metformin monotherapy. RESULTS: The pooled intention-to-treat population comprised 5,580 patients without diabetes (3,165 completed treatment) and 1,047 patients with diabetes (692 completed treatment). Most efficacy measures improved during the 4-week placebo run-in period, except that HDL cholesterol decreased as expected in the early phase of a hypocaloric diet. After 1 year of randomized treatment, changes from baseline with 20 mg rimonabant in the nondiabetic population were as follows: body weight -6.5 kg, waist circumference -6.4 cm, HDL cholesterol +16.4%, triglycerides -6.9%, fasting insulin -0.6 muU/ml, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) -0.2 (all P < 0.001 vs. placebo). In the diabetic population, 20 mg rimonabant reduced A1C levels by 0.6% (P < 0.001 vs. placebo). Regression analysis of change in HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, adiponectin (in RIO-Lipids), and A1C (in RIO-Diabetes) versus body weight at 1 year by ANCOVA suggested that 45-57% of the effect of rimonabant could not be explained by the observed weight loss. At 1 year, adverse events more frequently reported with rimonabant were gastrointestinal, neurological, and psychiatric in nature. Serious adverse events were infrequent and almost equivalent to placebo. Overall discontinuation rates were similar across treatment groups, except discontinuation from adverse events, which occurred more frequently with 20 mg rimonabant versus placebo (most commonly, depressive disorders [1.9 vs. 0.8%], nausea [1.4 vs. 0.1%], mood alterations with depressive symptoms [1.0 vs. 0.6%], and anxiety [1.0 vs. 0.3%]). A thorough review of psychiatric and neurological adverse events was performed. CONCLUSIONS: In overweight/obese patients, 20 mg/day rimonabant produced weight loss and significant improvements in multiple cardiometabolic risk factors such as waist circumference, A1C, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. Rimonabant was generally well tolerated, with more frequently reported adverse events being gastrointestinal, neurological, and psychiatric in nature. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of saxagliptin in combination with metformin compared with sitagliptin in combination with metformin in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Scheen, André ULg; Charpentier, Guillaume; Ostgren, Carl Johan et al

in Diabetes/Metabolism Research & Reviews (2010), 26(7), 540-9

BACKGROUND: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors improve glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus when used as monotherapy or in combination with other anti-diabetic drugs (metformin ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors improve glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus when used as monotherapy or in combination with other anti-diabetic drugs (metformin, sulphonylurea, or thiazolidinedione). This 18-week, phase 3b, multicentre, double-blind, noninferiority trial compared the efficacy and safety of two dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, saxagliptin and sitagliptin, in patients whose glycaemia was inadequately controlled with metformin. METHODS: Adult type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (N = 801) with glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) 6.5-10% on stable metformin doses (1500-3000 mg/day) were randomized 1 : 1 to add-on 5 mg saxagliptin or 100 mg sitagliptin once daily for 18 weeks. The primary efficacy analysis was a comparison of the change from baseline HbA(1c) at week 18 in per-protocol patients. Noninferiority was concluded if the upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval of the HbA(1c) difference between treatments was < 0.3%. RESULTS: The adjusted mean changes in HbA(1c) following the addition of saxagliptin or sitagliptin to stable metformin therapy were - 0.52 and - 0.62%, respectively. The between-group difference was 0.09% (95% confidence interval, - 0.01 to 0.20%), demonstrating noninferiority. Both treatments were generally well tolerated; incidence and types of adverse events were comparable between groups. Hypoglycaemic events, mostly mild, were reported in approximately 3% of patients in each treatment group. Body weight declined by a mean of 0.4 kg in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Saxagliptin added to metformin therapy was effective in improving glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled by metformin alone; saxagliptin plus metformin was noninferior to sitagliptin plus metformin, and was generally well tolerated. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled international trial
Cooper, C; Chapurlat, R; Christiansen, C et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2012), 71(3), 693

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: results of a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Badurski, J; Bellamy, N et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72(2), 179-86

BACKGROUND: Strontium ranelate is currently used for osteoporosis. The international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Strontium ranelate Efficacy in Knee OsteoarthrItis triAl evaluated its ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Strontium ranelate is currently used for osteoporosis. The international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Strontium ranelate Efficacy in Knee OsteoarthrItis triAl evaluated its effect on radiological progression of knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: Patients with knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3, and joint space width (JSW) 2.5-5 mm) were randomly allocated to strontium ranelate 1 g/day (n=558), 2 g/day (n=566) or placebo (n=559). The primary endpoint was radiographical change in JSW (medial tibiofemoral compartment) over 3 years versus placebo. Secondary endpoints included radiological progression, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and knee pain. The trial is registered (ISRCTN41323372). RESULTS: The intention-to-treat population included 1371 patients. Treatment with strontium ranelate was associated with smaller degradations in JSW than placebo (1 g/day: -0.23 (SD 0.56) mm; 2 g/day: -0.27 (SD 0.63) mm; placebo: -0.37 (SD 0.59) mm); treatment-placebo differences were 0.14 (SE 0.04), 95% CI 0.05 to 0.23, p<0.001 for 1 g/day and 0.10 (SE 0.04), 95% CI 0.02 to 0.19, p=0.018 for 2 g/day. Fewer radiological progressors were observed with strontium ranelate (p<0.001 and p=0.012 for 1 and 2 g/day). There were greater reductions in total WOMAC score (p=0.045), pain subscore (p=0.028), physical function subscore (p=0.099) and knee pain (p=0.065) with strontium ranelate 2 g/day. Strontium ranelate was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with strontium ranelate 1 and 2 g/day is associated with a significant effect on structure in patients with knee osteoarthritis, and a beneficial effect on symptoms for strontium ranelate 2 g/day. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee ostoarthritis : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled international trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(S5), 742-743

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See detailEfficacy and safety of tacrolimus compared with ciclosporin A in renal transplantation: three-year observational results
Krämer, Bernhard K.; Del Castillo, Domingo; Margreiter, Raimund et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2008), 23(7), 2386-2392

BACKGROUND: The European tacrolimus versus ciclosporin A microemulsion (CsA-ME) renal transplantation study showed that tacrolimus was significantly more effective in preventing acute rejection and had a ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The European tacrolimus versus ciclosporin A microemulsion (CsA-ME) renal transplantation study showed that tacrolimus was significantly more effective in preventing acute rejection and had a superior cardiovascular risk profile at 6 months. METHODS: The endpoints of this investigator-initiated, observational, 36-month follow-up were acute rejection incidence rates, rates of patient and graft survival and renal function. An additional analysis was performed using the combined endpoints BPAR, graft loss and patient death. Data available from the original ITT population (557 patients; 286 tacrolimus and 271 CsA-ME) were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 231 tacrolimus and 217 CsA-ME patients participated. At 36 months, Kaplan-Meier-estimated BPAR-free survival rates were 78.8% in the tacrolimus group and 60.6% in the CsA-ME group, graft survival rates were 88.0% and 86.9% and patient survival rates were 96.6% and 96.7%, respectively. The estimated combined endpoint-free survival rate was 71.4% with tacrolimus and 55.4% with CsA-ME (P <or= 0.001, chi-square test). Significantly more CsA-ME patients crossed over to tacrolimus during the 3-year follow-up: 21.2% versus 2.6%, P <or= 0.0001, chi-square test. Most patients in the tacrolimus arm discontinued steroids and received monotherapy and fewer tacrolimus patients remained on a triple regimen. Mean serum creatinine concentration was 145.4 +/- 90.9 micromol/L with tacrolimus and 149.0 +/- 92.1 micromol/L with CsA-ME. Significantly more CsA-ME patients had a classified cholesterol value >6 mmol/L (26.3% versus 12.6%, P <or= 0.0003, chi-square test). CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated with tacrolimus had significantly higher combined endpoint-free survival rates and lower acute rejection rates with less immunosuppressive medication at 36 months. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of tacrolimus compared with ciclosporin A microemulsion in renal transplantation: 2 year follow-up results
Krämer, Bernhard K.; Montagnino, Giuseppe; del Castillo, Domingo et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2005), 20

BACKGROUND: Comparison studies of calcineurin inhibitors as cornerstone immunosuppressants in renal transplantation have demonstrated that tacrolimus consistently reduces acute rejection rates and, in ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Comparison studies of calcineurin inhibitors as cornerstone immunosuppressants in renal transplantation have demonstrated that tacrolimus consistently reduces acute rejection rates and, in some studies, also improves long-term renal outcome in comparison to cyclosporin A (CsA). The aim of the present 2 year follow-up of the European Tacrolimus vs Cyclosporin A Microemulsion Renal Transplantation Study was to investigate long-term clinical outcome in terms of rate of acute rejection, graft and patient survival and graft function. METHODS: The European Tacrolimus vs Cyclosporin A Microemulsion Renal Transplantation Study was a randomized, comparative 6 month trial of the calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and CsA in combination with both azathioprine and steroids. The intent-to-treat population (ITT) consisted of 286 patients in the tacrolimus arm and 271 in the CsA microemulsion (CsA-ME) arm. Whereas whole blood level targets were 10-20 and 5-15 ng/ml for tacrolimus and 100-400 and 100-200 ng/ml for CsA during months 0-3 and 4-6, respectively, during the investigator-driven follow-up after termination of the main study (months 7-24) no specific calcineurin inhibitor target levels were required. Follow-up data were collected at 2 years post-transplantation from 237 (82.9% of the ITT population) patients who received tacrolimus and 222 (81.9% of the ITT population) patients who received CsA-ME. RESULTS: Calculated on ITT populations, mortality (2.0% vs 3.3%; P<0.05 in Kaplan-Meier analysis) was lower, but rate of graft loss (9.3% vs 11.2%; P = 0.12 in Kaplan-Meier analysis) was not significantly different after 2 years with tacrolimus- vs CsA-ME-based immunosuppression. Biopsy-proven acute rejection was significantly lower (19.6%) with tacrolimus than with CsA-ME (37.3%) during months 0-6 (P<0.0001), but was not significantly different during months 7-12 and 13-24 of follow-up (1.7% and 0.8% with tacrolimus and 4.7% and 0.9% with CsA-ME, respectively). A composite endpoint consisting of graft loss, patient death and biopsy-proven acute rejection occurred significantly more frequently in CsA-ME patients than in tacrolimus patients (42.8% vs 25.9%; P<0.001) during 24 months follow-up. Renal function 2 years post-transplant, measured by serum creatinine concentrations, was significantly better in tacrolimus-based compared with CsA-ME-based immunosuppression (136.9 vs 161.6 micromol/l; P<0.01). Cornerstone immunosuppression remained unchanged in 82.5% and 66.2% of patients treated with tacrolimus and CsA-ME, respectively. At 2 years, more patients in the tacrolimus arm were off steroids and received calcineurin inhibitor monotherapy, and fewer tacrolimus patients remained on a triple immunosuppressive regimen. The cardiovascular risk profile was affected favourably in the tacrolimus arm, with lower cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (despite less use of cholesterol-lowering drugs); no significant difference in requirement for antidiabetic medication was noted. CONCLUSIONS: The 2 year study results confirm that tacrolimus is a highly efficacious cornerstone immunosuppressant in kidney transplantation. Tacrolimus-based immunosuppression may induce long-term benefits with regard to graft function and graft survival. The overall side-effect profile is considered to be favourable. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of the fully human anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha monoclonal antibody adalimumab (D2E7) in DMARD refractory patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a 12 week, phase II study
van de Putte, L. B. A.; Rau, R.; Breedveld, F. C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2003), 62(12), 1168-1177

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate efficacy, dose response, safety, and tolerability of adalimumab (D2E7) in disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) refractory patients with longstanding, active rheumatoid ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate efficacy, dose response, safety, and tolerability of adalimumab (D2E7) in disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) refractory patients with longstanding, active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: During a 12 week, double blind, placebo controlled study, 284 patients were randomly allocated to receive weekly subcutaneous injections of adalimumab 20 mg (n = 72), 40 mg (n = 70), or 80 mg (n = 72) or placebo (n = 70) without concomitant DMARDs. RESULTS: Adalimumab significantly improved the signs and symptoms of RA for all efficacy measures. ACR20 responses with adalimumab were significant at each assessment versus placebo (p</=0.01). Additionally, ACR responses with adalimumab were achieved more rapidly than with placebo, with 82/115 (71%) of the ultimate ACR20 response rate to adalimumab treatment achieved at week 2. At week 12, for adalimumab 20, 40, and 80 mg, ACR20 response rates were 50.7%, 57.1%, and 54.2%, respectively, versus 10.0% for placebo (p</=0.001 for all comparisons); ACR50 rates were 23.9%, 27.1%, and 19.4%, respectively, versus 1.4% for placebo (p</=0.001 for all comparisons); and ACR70 rates were 11.3%, 10.0%, and 8.3%, respectively, versus 0.0% for placebo (p</=0.05 for all comparisons). All adalimumab doses significantly improved all ACR core criteria at all assessments. The 40 mg and 80 mg doses provided similar benefit. Adalimumab at all doses was generally well tolerated, with only mild or moderate adverse events. Completion rates were 87% for adalimumab and 67% for placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Adalimumab given as monotreatment to patients with longstanding, severe RA refractory to traditional DMARDs produced a rapid, sustained response and was safe and well tolerated, with no dose limiting side effects. [less ▲]

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