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See detailEffects of cerebral injury on transgenic mice expressing the human HSP70
Plumier, Jean-Christophe ULg; Arsmtrong, John Norman; Robertson, Harold A. et al

Poster (1995)

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See detailEffects of Changes in Nutritional Conditions on Timing of Puberty: Clinical Evidence from Adopted Children and Experimental Studies in the Male Rat
Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre ULg; Gerard, Arlette ULg; Alvarez Gonzalez, Maria-Luz ULg et al

in Hormone Research (1992), 38 Suppl 1(NULL), 97-105

Among 32 patients with idiopathic central precocious puberty seen during a 3-year period, 1/4 were adopted children from developing countries who showed early sexual maturation during the catch-up process ... [more ▼]

Among 32 patients with idiopathic central precocious puberty seen during a 3-year period, 1/4 were adopted children from developing countries who showed early sexual maturation during the catch-up process following their arrival in Belgium. To study the possible mechanism accounting for such clinical observations, we used the male rat as a model, and evaluated the effect of variations in early nutritional conditions, by manipulating litter size, on hypothalamic and testicular maturation. We had shown previously that, in the male rat, onset of puberty was preceded, between 15 and 25 days of age, by a transiently increased activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors involved in a facilitatory control of pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. We also showed that the proportion of elongated spermatids in testicular cell homogenates increased between 25 and 45 days of age. When compared to pups of a small litter (6/dam), those of a large litter (14/dam) showed a reduced growth rate (1.9 vs. 3.5 g/day) before weaning (21 days), whereas they grew at a similar rate (5.6 vs. 4.7 g/day) after weaning. At 35 days of age, the animals raised in the large litter showed evidence of delayed hypothalamic and testicular maturation when compared to animals from the small litter. Reduction of litter size at 17 days allowed food-restricted pups of a large litter to resume a normal growth rate before weaning.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detaileffects of cholecaciferol supplementation and optimized calcium intakes on vitamin D status, muscle strength and bone haelth: a one-year pilot randomized controlled trial in adults with severe burns
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; FOIDART-DESSALLE, Marguerite ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg et al

in Burns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries (in press)

Objective: Burn patients are at risk of hypovitaminosis D and osteopenia or sarcopenia. Vitamin D pleiotropic effects may influence bone and muscle health. The aim of this pilot study was to assess ... [more ▼]

Objective: Burn patients are at risk of hypovitaminosis D and osteopenia or sarcopenia. Vitamin D pleiotropic effects may influence bone and muscle health. The aim of this pilot study was to assess effects of a cholecalciferol (VD3) supplementation and an optimized calcium (Ca) regimen on vitamin D (VD) status, bone and muscle health during sequelar stage of burn injury. Design: Monocentric randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifteen adults with thermal burns dating from 2 to 5 years were randomized into two groups. For 12 months, they either received a quarterly IM injection of 200,000 IU VD3 and daily oral Ca (Group D) or placebo (Group P). VD status and bone remodeling markers were assessed every 3 months. Knee muscle strength and bone mineral density were, respectively, assessed using isokinetic dynamometry and dual X-ray absorptiometry at initiation (M0) and completion (M12) of the protocol. Results: Of all the patients, 66% presented with VD deficiency and 53% (with 3 men <40 y) were considered osteopenic at inclusion. After one year, calcidiol levels significantly increased in Group D to reach 40 (37–61) ng/ml. No significant change in bone health was observed in both groups while Group D significantly improved quadriceps strength when tested at high velocity. Conclusions: This VD3 supplementation was safe and efficient to correct hypovitaminosis D in burn adults. When combined with optimized Ca intakes, it demonstrated positive effects on muscle health but not on bone health. A high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D and osteopenia in these patients, as well as their wide range of muscle performances, seem to be worrying when considering rehabilitation and quality of life. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of chondroitin sulfate and interleukin-1 beta on human articular chondrocytes cultivated in clusters
Bassleer, C. T.; Combal, J. P.; Bougaret, S. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (1998), 6(3), 196-204

OBJECTIVE: To test the effects of chondroitin sulfate (ACS, a glycosaminoglycan of cartilage) with and without interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) on human articular chondrocytes cultivated in clusters and in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To test the effects of chondroitin sulfate (ACS, a glycosaminoglycan of cartilage) with and without interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) on human articular chondrocytes cultivated in clusters and in long-term (0-16 days or 16-32 days). DESIGN: Chondrocyte productions of proteoglycans (PGs), type II collagen (coll-II) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were assayed by specific radioimmunoassays applied to conditioned culture media and to clusters. RESULTS: During the two culture periods (0-16 days or 16-32 days), ACS (100-1000 micrograms/ml) increased total PG production and had no effect on the production of coll-II by chondrocytes. During the first 16 days, ACS (500-1000 micrograms/ml) decreased total PGE2 synthesis. IL-1 beta decreased PG and coll-II productions and increased PGE2 synthesis. During the first period (0-16 days), while the cluster is forming, ACS counteracted the IL-1 beta-induced effects on PG (500-1000 micrograms ACS/ml), coll-II (100-1000 micrograms ACS/ml) and PGE2 (500-1000 micrograms ACS/ml) productions. During the second period (16-32 days), when the cluster is already formed, ACS counteracted the IL-1 beta-induced effects on total PG (100-1000 micrograms ACS/ml), coll-II (1000 micrograms ACS/ml) and PGE2 (1000 micrograms ACS/ml) productions. CONCLUSION: These in vitro studies suggest that ACS is able to increase matrix component production by human chondrocytes and to inhibit the negative effects of IL-1 beta. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of chondroitin sulfate on the gene expression profile in IL-1β stimulated synovial fibroblast cells cultures
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, E. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2013, April), 21(Supplement April 2013),

Purpose: Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is one the most used molecules in the management of OA. In this study, we performed a microarray analysis and identified a differential expression profile between control ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is one the most used molecules in the management of OA. In this study, we performed a microarray analysis and identified a differential expression profile between control and IL-1β stimulated synovial fibroblast cells cultures. In a second step, we investigated the effects of CS on this gene expression profile. Methods: OA synovial specimens were obtained from 12 patients undergoing knee replacement. At the surgery time, the synovial membrane was dissected. Synovial fibroblast cells (SFC) were enzymatically isolated and used after four passages (P4). SFC were pre-treated 1 hour with highly purified bovine CS (200 µg/ml, Bioibérica S.A., Barcelona, Spain) before treatment with IL-1β (1 ng/ml) for 24 hours. Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy Mini Kit. RNA purity and quality were evaluated using the Experion RNA StdSens Analysis kit (Bio-rad Laboratories). Gene expression profiling was performed using Illumina’s multi-sample format Human HT-12 BeadChip (Illumina Inc.). Differential analysis was performed with the BRB array tools software. Class comparison test between control (Ctl) and interleukin (IL)-1β conditions, Ctl and Ctl/CS and IL-1β and IL-1β/CS conditions was based on paired t-test where Ctl and IL-1β, Ctl and Ctl/CS and IL-1β and IL-1β/CS were paired for each patient. The biological relevance of up- and down-regulated genes was analyses with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Ingenuity® Systems). Probes with a p-value below 0.001 were chosen and classified as up- or down-regulated ones. Results: 3308 genes were identified as differentially expressed genes between Ctl and IL-1β conditions. We observed a differential profile of expression of major pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. The key identified pathways were related to inflammation, complement cascade, angiogenesis, cartilage catabolism and anabolism and Wnt signaling. In the inflammatory network, the most upregulated cytokines were IL-8 and IL-6 with a fold change of 156.25 and 58.8 respectively. We also identified several chemokines, enzymes and metallothioneins (MTs). Complement factor B (CFB) and complement component 3 (C3) are two factors upregulated in the inflammatory complement cascade. We also identified some genes implicated in the angiogenesis pathway. The most upregulated was Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) with a fold change of 9.09. The differential expression of intermediates involved in both cartilage anabolism and catabolism was revealed by the IL-1β stimulation, showing an imbalance in favour of catabolism. MMP-3 was largely upregulated (fold change of 62.5). Wnt 5A and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP8) were significantly upregulated while frizzled homolog 2 (FZD2) and dickkopf homolog 3 (DKK3) were downregulated in the Wnt signaling pathway. We next performed a class comparison test between Ctl and Ctl/CS in one hand and IL-1β and IL-1β/CS on the other hand. 660 genes were identified as differentially expressed between Ctl and Ctl/CS conditions while 241 genes were identified between IL-1β and IL-1β/CS. Among them, our attention was focused on two genes upregulated in the presence of CS: lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4) and claudin 11 (CDLN11), two genes that negatively regulate cell invasion. Conclusions: We here evidenced in synovial fibroblast cells the modulation of gene expression following IL-1β stimulation. We also demonstrated the modulatory effects of CS on gene expression and isolated several CS-modulated genes of interest such as LOXL4 and CDLN11, which could constitute new mechanisms of action of the molecule and contribute to explain the symptomatic efficacy of CS in the treatment of OA. [less ▲]

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See detailEFFECTS OF CHONDROITIN SULFATE ON THE GENE EXPRESSION PROFILE IN INTERLEUKIN-1Β STIMULATED SYNOVIAL FIBROBLAST CELLS CULTURES
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, E et al

Conference (2013, November 23)

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See detailEffects of chondroitin sulfate on the gene expression profile in the inflamed synovial membrane
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, J-E; Montell, E. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2013, April), 21(Supplement April 2013),

Purpose: The aim of the present work was to identify the differentially expressed genes between the inflammatory (I) and normal/reactive (N/R) synovial areas using a unique ex vivo culture model. In a ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of the present work was to identify the differentially expressed genes between the inflammatory (I) and normal/reactive (N/R) synovial areas using a unique ex vivo culture model. In a second step, we investigated the genetic modulatory effects of chondroitin sulfate (CS) in this model. Methods: Synovial cells (SC) were isolated from OA synovial specimens obtained from 12 patients undergoing knee replacement. The inflammatory status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria. At the surgery time, the synovial membrane was dissected and biopsies from N/R and I areas cultured separately for a period of 7 days in the absence or in the presence of highly purified bovine CS (200 µg/ml, Bioibérica S.A., Barcelona, Spain). Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy Mini Kit. RNA purity and quality were evaluated using the Experion RNA StdSens Analysis kit (Bio-rad Laboratories). Gene expression profiling was performed using Illumina’s multi-sample format Human HT-12 BeadChip (Illumina Inc.). Differential analysis was performed with the BRB array tools software. Class Comparison test between N/R and I conditions, N/R and N/R-CS conditions and I and I-CS conditions was based on paired t-test where N/R and I, N/R and N/R-CS and I and I-CS were paired for each patient. The biological relevance of up- and down-regulated genes was analyses with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Ingenuity® Systems). Results: From among 47000 probes, 18253 were filtered out. Probes with a p-value below than 0.005 were chosen and classified as up- or down-regulated ones. By this way, 465 differentially expressed genes between N/R and I areas were identified. Many inflammatory mediators appear differentially expressed. The interferon alpha-inductible protein 6 (IFI6) was the most up-regulated. We also identified the hydroxysteroid (11-beta) dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1), the cathepsin K (CTSK), the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and the EBV-induced G-protein coupled receptor 2 (EBI2). The differential expression of intermediates involved in angiogenesis pathway was also revealed between N/R and I areas. Among them, R-spondin-3 (RSPO3), the secreted phopshoprotein 1 (SPP1) and aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were up-regulated whereas ADAMTS1 was down-regulated. Finally, in the Wnt signaling, RSPO3 was up-regulated unlike dickkopf homolog 3 (DKK3) which was in turn down-regulated. We next performed a class comparison test between N/R and N/R-CS in one hand and between I and I-CS the other hand. 489 genes were identified as differentially expressed genes between N/R and N/R-CS conditions while 219 genes were identified between I and I-CS conditions. In this latter, our attention was focused on the down-regulated genes. Among them, we identified a number implicated in angiogenesis and cell migration pathways. Thus, the endothelial cell-specific molecule-1 (ESM1), the Transmembrane-4-L-six-family-1 (TM4SF1), the 5’-Ectonucleotidase (NT5E) and the growth arrest-specific gene 6 (GAS6) were down-regulated by CS. Conclusions: Our work demonstrates the differential gene expression profile between paired non inflammatory and normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane as well as the modulatory effects of CS on gene expression in the inflammatory areas, especially regarding genes involved in both angiogenesis and cell migration. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of chondroitin sulfate on the gene expression profile in the inflamed synovial membrane
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, J-E; Montell, E. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2013, April), 21(Supplement April 2013),

Purpose: The aim of the present work was to identify the differentially expressed genes between the inflammatory (I) and normal/reactive (N/R) synovial areas using a unique ex vivo culture model. In a ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of the present work was to identify the differentially expressed genes between the inflammatory (I) and normal/reactive (N/R) synovial areas using a unique ex vivo culture model. In a second step, we investigated the genetic modulatory effects of chondroitin sulfate (CS) in this model. Methods: Synovial cells (SC) were isolated from OA synovial specimens obtained from 12 patients undergoing knee replacement. The inflammatory status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria. At the surgery time, the synovial membrane was dissected and biopsies from N/R and I areas cultured separately for a period of 7 days in the absence or in the presence of highly purified bovine CS (200 µg/ml, Bioibérica S.A., Barcelona, Spain). Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy Mini Kit. RNA purity and quality were evaluated using the Experion RNA StdSens Analysis kit (Bio-rad Laboratories). Gene expression profiling was performed using Illumina’s multi-sample format Human HT-12 BeadChip (Illumina Inc.). Differential analysis was performed with the BRB array tools software. Class Comparison test between N/R and I conditions, N/R and N/R-CS conditions and I and I-CS conditions was based on paired t-test where N/R and I, N/R and N/R-CS and I and I-CS were paired for each patient. The biological relevance of up- and down-regulated genes was analyses with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Ingenuity® Systems). Results: From among 47000 probes, 18253 were filtered out. Probes with a p-value below than 0.005 were chosen and classified as up- or down-regulated ones. By this way, 465 differentially expressed genes between N/R and I areas were identified. Many inflammatory mediators appear differentially expressed. The interferon alpha-inductible protein 6 (IFI6) was the most up-regulated. We also identified the hydroxysteroid (11-beta) dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1), the cathepsin K (CTSK), the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and the EBV-induced G-protein coupled receptor 2 (EBI2). The differential expression of intermediates involved in angiogenesis pathway was also revealed between N/R and I areas. Among them, R-spondin-3 (RSPO3), the secreted phopshoprotein 1 (SPP1) and aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were up-regulated whereas ADAMTS1 was down-regulated. Finally, in the Wnt signaling, RSPO3 was up-regulated unlike dickkopf homolog 3 (DKK3) which was in turn down-regulated. We next performed a class comparison test between N/R and N/R-CS in one hand and between I and I-CS the other hand. 489 genes were identified as differentially expressed genes between N/R and N/R-CS conditions while 219 genes were identified between I and I-CS conditions. In this latter, our attention was focused on the down-regulated genes. Among them, we identified a number implicated in angiogenesis and cell migration pathways. Thus, the endothelial cell-specific molecule-1 (ESM1), the Transmembrane-4-L-six-family-1 (TM4SF1), the 5’-Ectonucleotidase (NT5E) and the growth arrest-specific gene 6 (GAS6) were down-regulated by CS. Conclusions: Our work demonstrates the differential gene expression profile between paired non inflammatory and normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane as well as the modulatory effects of CS on gene expression in the inflammatory areas, especially regarding genes involved in both angiogenesis and cell migration. [less ▲]

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See detailEFFECTS OF CHONDROITIN SULFATE ON THE GENE EXPRESSION PROFILE IN THE INFLAMED SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, E et al

Conference (2013, November 23)

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See detailEffects of chronic obesity and weight loss on plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations in dogs.
Jeusette, Isabelle C; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Shibata, Haruki et al

in Research in Veterinary Science (2005), 79(2), 169-75

The objective of this study was to evaluate, in dogs, the effects of obesity and weight loss on plasma total ghrelin and leptin concentrations. Twenty-four Beagle dogs, 12 control lean and 12 obese dogs ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to evaluate, in dogs, the effects of obesity and weight loss on plasma total ghrelin and leptin concentrations. Twenty-four Beagle dogs, 12 control lean and 12 obese dogs of both genders and aged between 1 and 9 years, were used for the experiments. Mean body weight was 12.7+/-0.7 kg for the lean group and 21.9+/-0.8 kg for the obese group. The trial was divided into three phases. During phase 1, all 24 Beagle dogs were fed a maintenance diet. During phase 2, the obese dogs were submitted to a weight loss protocol with a high protein-low energy diet. The weight loss protocol ended once dogs reached optimal body weight. During phase 3, the dogs that were submitted to the weight loss protocol were maintained at their optimal body weight for 6 months. Plasma total ghrelin, leptin, insulin and glucose concentrations were measured to evaluate the effects of obesity and weight loss on these parameters in dogs. Body weight, body condition score, thoracic and pelvic perimeters, and ingested food amounts were also recorded during the study. Obese dogs demonstrated a significant decrease in plasma ghrelin and a significant increase in plasma leptin and insulin concentrations when compared with control dogs. During weight loss, significant increases in plasma total ghrelin and glucose and significant decreases in plasma leptin and insulin were observed. The increase in plasma ghrelin concentrations seemed to be transient. Body weight and the morphometric parameters correlated positively with leptin concentrations and negatively with total ghrelin concentrations. These results suggest that ghrelin and leptin could play a role in dogs in the adaptation to a positive or negative energy balance, as observed in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of ciclesonide and fluticasone on cortisol secretion in patients with persistent asthma.
Derom, E.; Louis, Renaud ULg; Tiesler, C. et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2009), 33(6), 1277-86

We compared the systemic and clinical effects of ciclesonide (CIC) and fluticasone propionate (FP) administered, in addition to CIC 160 microg x day(-1) and salmeterol 50 microg twice daily, in 32 ... [more ▼]

We compared the systemic and clinical effects of ciclesonide (CIC) and fluticasone propionate (FP) administered, in addition to CIC 160 microg x day(-1) and salmeterol 50 microg twice daily, in 32 patients with persistent asthma using a randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled, double-dummy, five-period crossover design. All patients exhibited a provocative concentration leading to a 20% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (PC(20)) methacholine <8 mg x mL(-1) and a PC(20) adenosine <60 mg x mL(-1). Primary outcome was 24-h serum cortisol suppression after 7 days. Secondary outcomes were changes in PC(20) methacholine and adenosine after 9 days. FP 500 microg x day(-1) and 1,000 microg x day(-1) significantly suppressed cortisol secretion versus placebo by -46.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) -83.8- -8.5) nmol x L(-1) and by -76.1 (95% CI -112.9- -39.3) nmol x L(-1), respectively. Neither dose of CIC (320 nor 640 microg x day(-1)) had a significant suppressive effect (-28.2 (95% CI -65.5-9.2) nmol x L(-1) and -37.3 (95% CI -74.7-0.0) nmol x L(-1), respectively). Differences between FP 1,000 microg x day(-1) and both CIC treatments were statistically significant (CIC 320 microg x day(-1): -48.0 (95% CI -84.8- -11.1) nmol x L(-1); CIC 640 microg x day(-1): -38.8 (95% CI -75.7- -1.9) nmol x L(-1)). Compared with placebo, the increase in PC(20) adenosine after the four treatments was small, but significant. Greater improvements in PC(20) adenosine were seen with FP 500 microg x day(-1) (1.8 (95% CI 1.0-2.6) doubling concentrations) compared with CIC 320 microg x day(-1) (0.9 (95% CI 0.1-1.7) doubling concentrations). No significant difference was seen between CIC 640 microg x day(-1) and FP 1,000 microg x day(-1). For a similar decrease in hyperresponsiveness, cortisol secretion was suppressed significantly with moderate-to-high doses of fluticasone propionate, but not with ciclesonide. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) loaded liposomes on mouse Ehrlich tumor cells.
De Pauw, Marie-Claire ULg; Heinen, Ernst ULg; Weber, Géraldine ULg et al

in European Journal of Cancer & Clinical Oncology (1986), 22(10), 1139-47

Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin) heavily or lightly loaded (fluid, solid, negatively charged or neutral) liposomes were prepared. Cisplatin release from liposomes was observed only after long ... [more ▼]

Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin) heavily or lightly loaded (fluid, solid, negatively charged or neutral) liposomes were prepared. Cisplatin release from liposomes was observed only after long dialysis times or after liver lysosomal enzymatic disintegration in solution. Mouse Ehrlich tumor cells (ELT) cultured in vitro were treated with cisplatin, liposomes or cisplatin loaded liposomes, and the effects on the mitotic activity, the DNA content and the ultrastructure were compared. Cisplatin (1-10 micrograms/ml) had an antimitotic activity and modified the DNA content in ELT cells. Ribosome aggregation, perichromatin or interchromatin granule accumulation, and chromatin condensation or some degree of dispersion could be observed. Negatively charged fluid liposomes had an antimitotic activity and modified the DNA content in ELT cells at lower concentrations (0.3 mumoles/ml) than in the case of neutral fluid liposomes (1.5 mumoles/ml). Negatively charged solid liposomes were not toxic at these concentrations. Ultrastructural analysis of ELT cells treated in vitro with negatively charged fluid liposomes revealed their extracellular adsorption and their disintegration in phagolysosomes. A fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane was not definitely demonstrated. Cisplatin loaded liposomes also had an antimitotic activity and modified the DNA content in ELT cells. These effects were similar to or more pronounced than those induced by free cisplatin. Ultrastructural analysis revealed some kind of electron dense material in phagolysosomes which was never observed after the treatment with free cisplatin or liposomes alone. Effects on nucleic acids were rarely observed. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Cis-Pt loaded liposomes on Ehrlich tumor cells
Gillet, Marie-Claire ULg; Heinen, Ernst ULg; Bassleer R

Conference (1982, April)

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See detailEffects of climate change on the river Meuse: Hydraulic 2D modeling from Amspin to Maaseik (and beyond)
Huismans, Ymkje; Dewals, Benjamin ULg; van der Mark, Rolien et al

Poster (2013, March 22)

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See detailEffects of CO2 on particle size distribution and phytoplankton abundance during a mesocosm bloom experiment (PeECE II)
Engel, Anja; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U. et al

in Biogeosciences (2008), 5(2), 509-521

The influence of seawater carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on the size distribution of suspended particles (2-60 mu m) and on phytoplankton abundance was investigated during a mesocosm experiment at the ... [more ▼]

The influence of seawater carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on the size distribution of suspended particles (2-60 mu m) and on phytoplankton abundance was investigated during a mesocosm experiment at the large scale facility (LFS) in Bergen, Norway, in the frame of the Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment study (PeECE II). In nine outdoor enclosures the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater was modified by an aeration system to simulate past (similar to 190 mu atm CO2), present (similar to 370 mu atm CO2) and future (similar to 700 mu atm CO2) CO2 conditions in triplicates. Due to the initial addition of inorganic nutrients, phytoplankton blooms developed in all mesocosms and were monitored over a period of 19 days. Seawater samples were collected daily for analysing the abundance of suspended particles and phytoplankton with the Coulter Counter and with Flow Cytometry, respectively. During the bloom period, the abundance of small particles (< 4 mu m) significantly increased at past, and decreased at future CO2 levels. At that time, a direct relationship between the total-surface-to-total-volume ratio of suspended particles and DIC concentration was determined for all mesocosms. Significant changes with respect to the CO2 treatment were also observed in the phytoplankton community structure. While some populations such as diatoms seemed to be insensitive to the CO2 treatment, others like Micromonas spp. increased with CO2, or showed maximum abundance at present day CO2 (i.e. Emiliania huxleyi). The strongest response to CO2 was observed in the abundance of small autotrophic nano-plankton that strongly increased during the bloom in the past CO2 mesocosms. Together, changes in particle size distribution and phytoplankton community indicate a complex interplay between the ability of the cells to physiologically respond to changes in CO2 and size selection. Size of cells is of general importance for a variety of processes in marine systems such as diffusion-limited uptake of substrates, resource allocation, predator-prey interaction, and gravitational settling. The observed changes in particle size distribution are therefore discussed with respect to biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of CO2, continental distribution, topography and vegetation changes on the climate at the Middle Miocene: a model study
Henrot, Alexandra ULg; François, Louis ULg; Favre, Eric ULg et al

in Climate of the Past (2010), 6

The Middle Miocene was one of the last warm periods of the Neogene, culminating with the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO, approximatively 17–15 Ma). Several proxy-based reconstructions support ... [more ▼]

The Middle Miocene was one of the last warm periods of the Neogene, culminating with the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO, approximatively 17–15 Ma). Several proxy-based reconstructions support warmer and more humid climate during the MMCO. The mechanisms responsible for the warmer climate at the MMCO and particularly the role of the atmospheric carbon dioxide are still highly debated. Here we carried out a series of sensitivity experiments with the model of intermediate complexity Planet Simulator, investigating the contributions of the absence of ice on the continents, the opening of the Central American and Eastern Tethys Seaways, the lowering of the topography on land, the effect of various atmospheric CO2 concentrations and the vegetation feedback. Our results show that a higher than present-day CO2 concentration is necessary to generate a warmer climate at all latitudes at the Middle Miocene, in agreement with the terrestrial proxy reconstructions which suggest high atmospheric CO2 concentrations at the MMCO. Nevertheless, the changes in sea-surface conditions, the lowering of the topography on land and the vegetation feedback also produce significant local warming that may, locally, even be stronger than the CO2 induced temperature increases. The lowering of the topography leads to a more zonal atmospheric circulation and allows the westerly flow to continue over the lowered Plateaus at mid-latitudes. The reduced height of the Tibetan Plateau notably prevents the development of a monsoon-like circulation, whereas the reduction of elevations of the North American and European reliefs strongly increases precipitation from northwestern to eastern Europe. The changes in vegetation cover contribute to maintain and even to intensify the warm and humid conditions produced by the other factors, suggesting that the vegetation-climate interactions could help to improve the model-data comparison. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of coal sampling density on the elemental analysis by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy
Li, Jie ULg; Lu, Jidong; Lin, Zhaoxiang et al

in Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology(Natural Science Edition) (2009), 37(2), 112-116

Three representative coals from different mines were sampled for analysis. In order to investigate t he effect s of density of samples on t he coal analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, the ... [more ▼]

Three representative coals from different mines were sampled for analysis. In order to investigate t he effect s of density of samples on t he coal analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, the powder samples and pellet samples which pressed with different pressures were selected for the experiment . The spectra of 200~850 nm of powder and pellet coal samples were obtained , and the emission lines of component s such as C , H , O , N , Al , Fe , Ca , Mg , Si , Ti , Na and K were recorded. Emission lines of C , Al , Ca , Mg , Si and Ti element s were chosen for analysis of calibration curve method and internal standardization met hod because of their high intensity and little interference. The results showed that the density of the samples has more effect s on the calibration curve met hod than the internal standardization met hod. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of cognitive remediation therapy on AM deficits in schizophrenia patients
Boulanger, Marie ULg; Collet, Denis; Cornet, Lidvine et al

Poster (2008)

Schizophrenia is accompanied by deficit in autobiographical memories (AM). These impairments are correlated to difficulties in imagining specific events that might happen to them in the future ... [more ▼]

Schizophrenia is accompanied by deficit in autobiographical memories (AM). These impairments are correlated to difficulties in imagining specific events that might happen to them in the future (D’Argembeau, Raffard et Van-der-Linden, 2008). Previous study suggested that the specific autobiographical memory (past and future) may be improved by an AM remediation therapy (Blairy et al., accepted). The aim of the present study was to compare performances from individuals involved in an AM remediation intervention to individuals involved in the cognitive remediation therapy program from Brenner (IPT) (Pomini, Neis, Brenner, Hodel et Roder, 1998). The results showed that the participants tend to recall more specific events after therapies, confounded pass and future events (t(7) = 3.28 ; p = .013). These results would be promising for future research. [less ▲]

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