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See detailLe dopage en cyclisme sur route : un objet d’étude criminologique
Fincoeur, Bertrand ULg

in Guedah, Mohammed (Ed.) Délinquances et changements sociaux des modes de vie et des pratiques d'intervention (2009)

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See detailLe dopage en cyclisme sur route: un objet d'étude criminologique
Fincoeur, Bertrand ULg

Conference (2008, May 11)

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See detailLe dopage
Kaux, Jean-François ULg

Learning material (2015)

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See detailDopamine 'D2-like' receptor agonists in combination with cocaine: absence of interactive effects on locomotor activity.
Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Reggers, Jean ULg; Terry, P.

in Behavioural Pharmacology (1997), 8(2-3), 147-59

This study examined interactions between cocaine and drugs that act as direct agonists at subtypes of "D2-like" dopamine receptors. The drugs 7-OH-DPAT, quinpirole and RU24213 were studied alone and in ... [more ▼]

This study examined interactions between cocaine and drugs that act as direct agonists at subtypes of "D2-like" dopamine receptors. The drugs 7-OH-DPAT, quinpirole and RU24213 were studied alone and in combination with cocaine for their effects on locomotor activity in non-habituated mice. Locomotor activity was measured by photobeam crossings over 140 min. At the doses given (7-OH-DPAT: 0.006-6.4 mg/kg; quinpirole: 0.001-1 mg/kg; RU24213: 0.008-8 mg/kg) all three direct agonists dose-dependently reduced locomotor activity throughout the test, whereas cocaine (0.6-20 mg/kg) produced dose-related hyperactivity. Next, for each direct agonist, a series of doses was selected (up to threshold behaviourally-active doses) as pretreatments to a sub-maximally stimulant dose of cocaine (15 mg/kg). 7-OH-DPAT and quinpirole did not modulate the effects of cocaine; RU24213 produced, at best, a very modest attenuation of the effects of cocaine. Finally, a series of cocaine doses (below stimulant threshold) was given before a single dose of each direct agonist (the lowest dose to reduce activity significantly). Cocaine did not reliably alter the hypoactivity produced by any of the D2-like agonists. By demonstrating negligible interactions between cocaine and D2-like agonists, the results fail to demonstrate any necessary involvement of D2-like receptors in one of the behavioural effects of cocaine. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine activates noradrenergic receptors in the preoptic area
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2002), 22(21), 9320-9330

Dopamine (DA) facilitates male sexual behavior and modulates aromatase activity in the quail preoptic area (POA). Aromatase neurons in the POA receive dopaminergic inputs, but the anatomical substrate ... [more ▼]

Dopamine (DA) facilitates male sexual behavior and modulates aromatase activity in the quail preoptic area (POA). Aromatase neurons in the POA receive dopaminergic inputs, but the anatomical substrate that mediates the behavioral and endocrine effects of DA is poorly understood. Intracellular recordings showed that 100 muM DA hyperpolarizes most neurons in the medial preoptic nucleus (80%) by a direct effect, but depolarizes a few others (10%). DA-induced hyperpolarizations were not blocked by D1 or D2 antagonists (SCH-23390 and sulpiride). Extracellular recordings confirmed that DA inhibits the firing of most cells (52%) but excites a few others (24%). These effects also were not affected by DA antagonists (SCH-23390 and sulpiride) but were blocked by alpha(2)-(yohimbine) and alpha(1)-(prazosin) noradrenergic receptor antagonists, respectively. Two dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitors (cysteine and fusaric acid) did not block the DA-induced effects, indicating that DA is not converted into norepinephrine (NE) to produce its effects. The pK(B) of yohimbine for the receptor involved in the DA- and NE-induced inhibitions was similar, indicating that the two monoamines interact with the same receptor. Together, these results demonstrate that the effects of DA in the POA are mediated mostly by the activation of alpha(2) (inhibition) and alpha(1) (excitation) adrenoreceptors. This may explain why DA affects the expression of male sexual behavior through its action in the POA, which contains high densities of alpha(2)-noradrenergic but limited amounts of DA receptors. This study thus clearly demonstrates the existence of a cross talk within CNS catecholaminergic systems between a neurotransmitter and heterologous receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine and Migraine: A Review of Pharmacological, Biochemical, Neurophysiological, and Therapeutic Data
Mascia, A.; Afra, J.; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (1998), 18(4), 174-82

The dopamine theory of migraine pathogenesis, first proposed by F. Sicuteri in 1977, has attracted renewed interest after an increased frequency of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene allele NcoI C was ... [more ▼]

The dopamine theory of migraine pathogenesis, first proposed by F. Sicuteri in 1977, has attracted renewed interest after an increased frequency of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene allele NcoI C was found in patients with migraine with aura. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine binds to alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors in the song control system of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Castelino, Christina B; Ball, Gregory F

in Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy (2008), 35(2), 202-15

A commonly held view is that dopamine exerts its effects via binding to D1- and D2-dopaminergic receptors. However, recent data have emerged supporting the existence of a direct interaction of dopamine ... [more ▼]

A commonly held view is that dopamine exerts its effects via binding to D1- and D2-dopaminergic receptors. However, recent data have emerged supporting the existence of a direct interaction of dopamine with adrenergic but this interaction has been poorly investigated. In this study, the pharmacological basis of possible in vivo interactions between dopamine and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors was investigated in zebra finches. A binding competition study showed that dopamine displaces the binding of the alpha(2)-adrenergic ligand, [(3)H]RX821002, in the brain. The affinity of dopamine for the adrenergic sites does not differ between the sexes and is 10- to 28-fold lower than that for norepinephrine. To assess the anatomical distribution of this interaction, binding competitions were performed on brain slices incubated in 5nM [(3)H]RX821002 in the absence of any competitor or in the presence of norepinephrine [0.1microM] or dopamine [1microM]. Both norepinephrine and dopamine displaced the binding of the radioligand though to a different extent in most of the regions studied (e.g., area X, the lateral part of the magnocellular nucleus of anterior nidopallium, HVC, arcopallium dorsale, ventral tegmental area and substantia grisea centralis) but not in the robust nucleus of the arcopallium. Together these data provide evidence for a direct interaction between dopamine and adrenergic receptors in songbird brains albeit with regional variation. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine D2 receptor gene expression in growth hormone-producing pituitary adenomas
Tabarin, A.; Carrié, F.; Ronci, N. et al

in 4th International Pituitary Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailDopamine D2 receptor gene expression in growth hormone-producing pituitary adenomas
Tabarin, A.; Carrie, F.; Beckers, Albert ULg et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailDopamine D4 receptors, a new opportunity for research on schizophrenia
Liégeois, Jean-François ULg; Eyrolles, L.; Bruhwyler, J. et al

in Current Medicinal Chemistry (1998), 5

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See detailDopamine D4 selective ligands as potential antipsychotics
Liégeois, Jean-François ULg; Bruhwyler, J.

in Awouters, Frank (Ed.) Proceedings of the XIVth International Symposium on Medicinal Chemistry (1997)

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See detailDopamine et dépression: le neurotransmetteur oublié.
Pitchot, William ULg; Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

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See detailDopamine modulates male sexual behavior in Japanese quail in part via actions on noradrenergic receptors
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Dejace, C.; Ball, G. F. et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2005), 163(1), 42-57

In rats, dopamine (DA) facilitates male sexual behavior through its combined action on D1- and D2-like receptors, in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) as well as other brain areas. In Japanese quail ... [more ▼]

In rats, dopamine (DA) facilitates male sexual behavior through its combined action on D1- and D2-like receptors, in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) as well as other brain areas. In Japanese quail, systemic injections of dopaminergic drugs suggested a similar pharmacology but central injections have never been performed. Recent electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that DA effects in the MPOA of quail are mediated mainly through the activation of alpha(2)-noradrenergic receptors. Previous studies of DA action on behavior used specific dopaminergic agonists/antagonists and therefore unintentionally avoided the potential cross-reaction with a-receptors. The present study was thus designed to investigate directly the effects of DA on male sexual behavior and to test whether the interaction of DA with heterologous receptors affects this behavior. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of DA or NE inhibited copulation in a dose-dependent manner. Systemic injections of yohimbine, an alpha(2)-noradrenergic antagonist, modulated copulation in a bimodal manner depending on the dose injected. Interestingly, a behaviorally ineffective dose of yohimbine markedly reduced the inhibitory effects of DA when injected 15 min before. Together, these results show for the first time that i.c.v. injections of DA itself inhibit male sexual behavior in quail and suggest that the interaction of DA with alpha(2)-receptors has behavioral significance. (C) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine, motivation, and the evolutionary significance of gambling-like behaviour
Anselme, Patrick ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2013), 256(1), 1-4

If given a choice between certain and uncertain rewards, animals tend to prefer the uncertain option, even when the net gain is suboptimal. Animals are also more responsive to reward-related cues in ... [more ▼]

If given a choice between certain and uncertain rewards, animals tend to prefer the uncertain option, even when the net gain is suboptimal. Animals are also more responsive to reward-related cues in uncertain situations. This well-documented phenomenon in many animal species is in opposition to the basic principles of reinforcement as well as the optimal foraging theory, which suggest that animals will prefer the option associated with the highest reward rate. How does the brain code the attractiveness of unreliable/poor reward sources? And how can we interpret this evidence from an adaptive point of view? I argue that unpredictability and deprivation – whether physiological or psychological – enhance motivation to seek valuable stimuli for the same reason: compensating the difficulty an organism has to predict significant objects and events in the environment. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine-GABAergic mechanisms of rearing and locomotion in infant and weanling mice
Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Jodogne, C.

in Psychobiology (1990), 18(4), 443-450

Examined tue modulatory effects of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA)-A agonist muscimol on supported rearing and locomotion induced by the indirect dopamine agonist D-amphetamine (DAM). A total of 288 ... [more ▼]

Examined tue modulatory effects of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA)-A agonist muscimol on supported rearing and locomotion induced by the indirect dopamine agonist D-amphetamine (DAM). A total of 288 infant, weanling, and adult outbred mice were tested in 2 experiments. In adult mice, muscimol at 1,3 mg/kg DAM-induced locomotion but not rearing, whereas 1,9 mg/kg muscimol blocked both behaviors. While 0,025 mg/kg muscimol reduced 2mg/kg DAM-induced rearing without altering locomotion in infants, it affected neither rearing nor locomotion in weanlings. In infant mice, 0,075 mg/kg muscimol engendered gnawing and self-biting, a typical effect of dopamine^GABAergic pharmacological activation. Maturation of dopamine^GABAergic behavioral functions may follow a near-monotonic continuity starting a few days after birth. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved) [less ▲]

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See detailDopaminergic function in panic disorder: comparison with major and minor depression.
Pitchot, William ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg; Gonzalez Moreno, A. et al

in Biological Psychiatry (1992), 32(11), 1004-11

Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine might be involved in anxiety states. In this study, we assessed the growth hormone (GH) response to apomorphine (a dopaminergic agonist) 0.5 mg SC in nine ... [more ▼]

Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine might be involved in anxiety states. In this study, we assessed the growth hormone (GH) response to apomorphine (a dopaminergic agonist) 0.5 mg SC in nine drug-free inpatients meeting Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for panic disorder who were age-matched and gender-matched with nine major depressive, and nine minor depressive inpatients. The three groups differed significantly in their mean GH peak response: 5.29 +/- 2.75 ng/ml in major depressives, 26.27 +/- 12.71 ng/ml in minor depressives, and 37.28 +/- 10.58 ng/ml in panics, with a significantly higher response in panic than in either minor or major depressive patients. These results support dopaminergic overactivity in panic disorder as compared with major and minor depression. [less ▲]

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See detailDopaminergic influences on motor memory formation in the elderly. A combined behavioral-TMS/PET study.
Floel, Agnes; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg; Giraux, Pascal et al

in Abstract Viewer/Itinerary planner. Washington DC: Society for Neuroscience (2005), (Suppl. S), 104-104

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See detailDopaminergic neurones: much more than dopamine?
Seutin, Vincent ULg

in British Journal of Pharmacology (2005), 146(2), 167-9

Midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurones sustain important physiological functions such as control of motricity, signalling of the error in prediction of rewards and modulation of emotions and cognition ... [more ▼]

Midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurones sustain important physiological functions such as control of motricity, signalling of the error in prediction of rewards and modulation of emotions and cognition. Moreover, their degeneration leads to Parkinson's disease and they may be dysfunctional in other pathological states, such as schizophrenia and drug abuse. A subset of DA neurones has been known for many years to contain releasable peptides such as neurotensin and cholecystokinin. However, recent experimental evidence indicates that the phenotype of DA neurones may be much more diverse, since it is suggested that, under certain conditions, they may also release glutamate, cannabinoids and even serotonin. [less ▲]

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