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See detailEffect of geotextiles on crack propagation in the pavement overlays
Courard, Luc ULg; Rigo, Jean-Marie ULg

in Karunaratne, G.P.; Wong, C. (Eds.) Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Geotextiles, Geomembranes and Related Products (1994)

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See detailEffect of glucosamine sulfate on health utility data in patients with knee osteoarthritis : reanalysis of two 3-year prospective studies.
Scholtissen, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2009, March), 20(Suppl.1), 18

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See detailEffect of glucosamine sulfate on newly proposed/recommended clinical trial end-points in patients with knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Giacovelli, G.; Pavelka, K. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 13

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See detailEffect of GnRH day 12 after artificial insemination on pregnancy rate in the cow
Szenci, O.; Perényi, Z.; Karen, A. et al

in Proceedings: 23rd World Buiatrics Congress, Québec, Canada (2004)

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See detailThe effect of gonadal development and sex steroids on growth hormone secretion in the male tilapia hybrid (Oreochromis niloticus x O. aureus O;
Melamed, P.; Eliahu, N.; Ofir, M. et al

in Fish Physiology and Biochemistry (1995)

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See detailEffect of gonadal steroids on pituitary LH secretion and mediobasal hypothalamic GnRH mRNA in ferrets.
Bakker, Julie ULg; Baum, M. J.

in Journal of Reproduction and Fertility (2000), 119(2), 315-21

In vitro release and content of GnRH in mediobasal hypothalamic slices are reduced by ovariectomy of female ferrets but are not affected by castration of male ferrets in breeding condition. The aim of the ... [more ▼]

In vitro release and content of GnRH in mediobasal hypothalamic slices are reduced by ovariectomy of female ferrets but are not affected by castration of male ferrets in breeding condition. The aim of the present study was to determine whether this sex difference reflects a sexually dimorphic effect of gonadal steroids on mediobasal hypothalamic GnRH mRNA content of male and female ferrets killed 4 weeks after gonadectomy, either with or without steroid hormone replacement. This time interval exceeds the 6-10 days needed for increments in plasma LH concentrations to stabilize after gonadectomy of ferrets of both sexes. In situ hybridization using an (35)S-labelled oligoprobe complementary to the human GnRH coding region showed that the number of mediobasal hypothalamic neurones and the cellular content of GnRH mRNA did not differ significantly among groups of male and female ferrets that were either in breeding condition or that had been gonadectomized and treated with sex steroids or oil vehicle. These results indicate that gonadal hormones regulate mediobasal hypothalamic GnRH biosynthesis and release in both sexes via post-transcriptional events that may include GnRH mRNA translation or the conversion of pre-pro GnRH precursor into mature GnRH. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of grade on disease-free survival and overall survival in FIGO Stage I adenocarcinoma of the endometrium.
Delaloye, J-F; Pampallona, S; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology & Reproductive Biology (2000), 88

Abstract Objective : To analyse the effect of differentiation on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I adenocarcinoma of the endometrium. Patients and methods ... [more ▼]

Abstract Objective : To analyse the effect of differentiation on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I adenocarcinoma of the endometrium. Patients and methods : From 1979 to 1995, 350 patients with FIGO stage IA–IC with well (G1), moderately (G2) or poorly (G3) differentiated tumors were treated with surgery and high dose-rate brachytherapy with or without external radiation. Median age was 65 years (39–86 years). Results : The 5-year DFS was 8863% for the G1 tumors, 7764% for the G2 tumors, and 6767% for the G3 tumors (P50.0049). With regard to the events contributing to DFS, the 5-year cumulative percentage of local relapse was 4.6% for the G1 tumors, 9.0% for the G2 tumors, and 4.6% (P50.027) for the G3 tumors. Cumulative percentage of metastasis was 1.4, 6.3 and 7.2% (P,0.001), respectively, whereas percentages of death were 6.0, 7.9 and 20.7% (P,0.001). The 5-year OS was 9163, 8364 and 7667%, respectively (P50.0018). In terms of multivariate hazard ratios (HR), the relative differences between the three differentiation groups correspond to an increase of 77% of the risk of occurrence of either of the three events considered for the DFS (HR51.77, 95% Cl [0.94–3.33]), (P50.078) for the G2 tumors and of 163% (HR52.63, 95% Cl [1.27–5.43]), (P50.009) for the G3 tumors with respect to the G1 tumors. The estimated relative hazards for OS are, respectively, in line with those for DFS: HR51.51 (P50.282) for the G2 tumors; and HR53.37 (P50.003) for the G3 tumors. Conclusion : Patients with grade 1 tumors are those least exposed to either local relapse, metastasis, or death. In contrast patients with grade 2 tumors seem to be at higher risk of metastasis, whereas patients with grade 3 tumors appear at higher risk of death. Since we have looked at the first of three competing events (local relapse, metastasis and death), this suggests that patients with grade 3 tumors probably progress to death so fast that local relapse, if any, cannot be observed. Ó 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of grazing method, nitrogen level, supplementary feeding and stocking rate on the performance of young grazing bulls
Bienfait, Jean-Marie ULg; Gielen, Marc ULg; Limbourg, Pierre et al

in A seminar of the CEC. Grassland Beef Production (1984)

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See detailEffect of ground scattering on noise barriers efficiency
Billon, Alexis ULg; Nemerlin, Jean ULg; Embrechts, Jean-Jacques ULg

Conference (2010, April 29)

Noise barriers are popular devices to mitigate the impact of roads or railway noise on the community. So, heavy works have been devoted to improve their efficiency, both through their shapes and their ... [more ▼]

Noise barriers are popular devices to mitigate the impact of roads or railway noise on the community. So, heavy works have been devoted to improve their efficiency, both through their shapes and their building materials. In this work, the effect of ground scattering on the insertion loss created by a straight hard thin screen is investigated using a 1/10th scale model. The ground possesses thus a repetitive structure to induce scattering. Measurements are conducted on both sides of the screen and comparisons are drawn with a flat ground configuration. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of groundnut cake substitution by glandless cottonseed kernels on broilers production: animal performance, nutrient digestibility, carcass characteristics and fatty acid composition of muscle and fat
Diaw, Mamadou Tandiang; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Mergeai, Guy ULg et al

in International Journal of Poultry Sciences (2010), 9(5), 473-481

A study has been conducted with broilers to assess, during the rainy season, the effects of groundnut cake substitution by glandless Cottonseed Kernel (CSK), at levels of 0, 25, 50 and 75%. The ... [more ▼]

A study has been conducted with broilers to assess, during the rainy season, the effects of groundnut cake substitution by glandless Cottonseed Kernel (CSK), at levels of 0, 25, 50 and 75%. The substitution improved linearly feed intake and animal growth, as well as carcass component weights and allometric parameters. The CSK increased the C18:2 n-6 to C18:1 n-9 ratio, as well in diet as in meat and subcutaneous fat. In order to explain the observed performances, the possibility is considered that broilers used preferentially C18:2 n-6 fatty acids for their metabolism. Complete glandless cottonseed kernels are probably highly valuable for broilers production in warm and wet conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of growth at low temperature on the activity and expression of the uncoupling protein in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondria.
Jarmuszkiewicz, W.; Antos, N.; swida, A. et al

in FEBS Letters (2004), 569

Mitochondria of amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, a non-photosynthetic soil amoeboid protozoon, possess an uncoupling protein (AcUCP) that mediates free fatty acid-activated proton re-uptake dissipating ... [more ▼]

Mitochondria of amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, a non-photosynthetic soil amoeboid protozoon, possess an uncoupling protein (AcUCP) that mediates free fatty acid-activated proton re-uptake dissipating the proton electrochemical gradient built up by respiration. The present study provides the first evidence that UCP could be a cold response protein in unicellulars. In mitochondria isolated from an amoeba batch culture grown temporarily at low temperature (6 degrees C), the content of AcUCP was increased and correlated with an increase in the linoleic acid (LA)-stimulated UCP-mediated carboxyatractyloside-resistant state 4 respiration, as compared to a control culture (routinely grown at 28 degrees C). Moreover, the cytochrome pathway activity was found to be insensitive to the cold exposure of amoeba cells, as indicated by respiration and membrane potential measurements as well as by an absence of change in the adenine nucleotide translocator and cytochrome oxidase expression levels. Furthermore, in mitochondria from the low-temperature-grown cells, at fixed LA concentration, the increased contribution of AcUCP activity to total mitochondrial phosphorylating respiration accompanied by lower coupling parameters was found, as was confirmed by calculation of this contribution using ADP/O measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of growth rate and radial position on the natural durability of Douglas-fir
Pollet, Caroline; Henin, Jean-Marc; Jourez, Benoît ULg et al

Conference (2012, July 11)

In terms of natural durability, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) fame owns to the favourable characteristics of centuries-old trees harvested in old-growth North American forests. The ... [more ▼]

In terms of natural durability, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) fame owns to the favourable characteristics of centuries-old trees harvested in old-growth North American forests. The properties of wood coming from plantations harvested between 50 and 100 years-old are likely to be different. In such stands, plantation density and thinning intensity may have a large impact on the trees growth rate. Since this parameter is known to affect some properties of the wood, it was decided to assess to what extent an increase in Douglas fir growth rate affects the natural durability of its wood. This issue is indeed poorly documented in the scientific literature. This parameter was evaluated on standardized heartwood specimens taken from 60 trees originating from 10 stands in Wallonia (Southern Belgium). In all these stands, the average girth of the trees ranged between 140 and 160cm, whilst their age (from plantation) ranged from 38 to 66 years old: These stands are thus representative of very contrasted silvicultural management practices. In terms of individual growth, the Mean Ring Width of the trees ranges between ca 3 and 7mm. Globally, 600 tests specimens were taken from two radial positions in the heartwood of each tree. Half of the specimens were taken in the heartwood at the border of the sapwood; the other half encloses the 20 years old ring, counting from the pith. The mass losses caused by the wood decaying fungus Poria placenta were assessed according to Cen/ts 15083-1 (2005).The natural durability of the wood is discussed as affected by sites, trees, radial positions in tree and tree growth rate. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of growth rate on the natural durability of Douglas-fir in western Europe
Pollet, Caroline; Henin, Jean-Marc; Hebert, Jacques ULg et al

in Canadian Journal of Forest Research = Journal Canadien de la Recherche Forestière (2013), 43(10), 891-896

Douglas-fir is a relatively recent species in the central European forest landscape. It is not clear how its natural durability is influenced by silviculture. We therefore investigated how the natural ... [more ▼]

Douglas-fir is a relatively recent species in the central European forest landscape. It is not clear how its natural durability is influenced by silviculture. We therefore investigated how the natural durability of the (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) Douglas-fir varies according to tree growth rate; subsequently, the influence of the nature of the wood (juvenile or mature) and radial position was also analyzed. For this purposes, a total of 60 trees grown in Wallonia (Southern Belgium) was felled: these consisted of 6 trees in each of 10 stands where the average tree girth was approximately 150 cm. Since the age of these plantations ranged from 40 to 69 years, the radial tree growth rate ranged between approximately 3 and 7 mm. In all the trees, standardized heartwood test specimens were taken from different radial positions in the butt log. The mass losses caused by the fungi Poria placenta and Coniophora puteana were assessed according to CEN/TS 15083-1 (2005). Poria placenta exhibited a higher decaying efficiency than C. puteana, leading to classify Douglas-fir wood as slightly durable (class 4). No difference was observed between the durability against P. placenta of juvenile and mature wood. Similarly, growth rate seemed to have no direct impact on durability. Durability was, however, significantly correlated with wood density. The effect of site and tree on the natural durability of the wood was also examined. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of haemodialysis on acoustic shear wave propagation in the skin.
Uhoda, I.; Petite, Louicette ULg; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Dermatology : International Journal for Clinical & Investigative Dermatology (2004), 209(2), 95-100

BACKGROUND: Diverse skin alterations may develop in patients under chronic haemodialysis. Among them, signs of premature photo-ageing have been described. AIM: To assess alterations in the physical ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Diverse skin alterations may develop in patients under chronic haemodialysis. Among them, signs of premature photo-ageing have been described. AIM: To assess alterations in the physical properties of skin consistent with ageing effects and with cutaneous fluid exchanges during haemodialysis sessions. METHODS: In the first part of the study, 45 haemodialysed patients were compared to 45 age-, sex- and body-mass-index-matched healthy subjects. In the second part of the study, skin of 30 haemodialysed patients was assessed immediately before and after a haemodialysis session. The speed of ultrasound shear wave propagation was measured in each subject. Series of 16 multidirectional resonance running time measurements (RRTM) were performed on the forehead and/or the volar forearm. They were averaged for each subject. The corresponding intra-individual coefficients of variation were calculated as an estimate of the skin mechanical anisotropy. RESULTS: In both haemodialysed patients and their matched controls, RRTM values were significantly higher on the forearms than on the forehead. By contrast, no significant difference was found in RRTM values that could be ascribed to chronic haemodialysis. However, RRTM values were significantly increased as an immediate and probably transient effect of haemodialysis sessions. In healthy subjects, ageing was associated with increased RRTM values. CONCLUSION: Chronic haemodialysis does not appear to influence significantly the functional expression of the dermal ageing process. Subtle fluid movements occurring in the skin during haemodialysis sessions can be assessed by measuring non-invasively the speed of ultrasound shear wave propagation in the skin. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of harvest time on seed oil and protein contents and compositions in the oleaginous gourd Lagenaria siceria (Molina) Standl
Loukou, Ahou; Lognay, Georges ULg; Barthelemy, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (2011), 91(11), 2073-2080

BACKGROUND: The stage of fruit ripeness at the time of harvest determines the final quality of ripe fruit. In this study, changes in the chemical composition of seed kernels from the oleaginous gourd ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The stage of fruit ripeness at the time of harvest determines the final quality of ripe fruit. In this study, changes in the chemical composition of seed kernels from the oleaginous gourd Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl. during maturation were evaluated to determine the best time to harvest the berries. Two cultivars (round and oval berry) were studied at three maturation stages (30 and 50 days after fruit set (DAFS) and complete plant whiteness (CPW)). [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of head-to-head addition in vinyl acetate controlled radical polymerization: why is Co(acac)2-mediated polymerization so much better?
Morin, Aurélie N.; Detrembleur, Christophe ULg; Jérôme, Christine ULg et al

in Macromolecules (2013), 46(11), 4303-4312

The controlled polymerization of vinyl acetate has been recently achieved by several techniques, but PVAc with targeted Mn and low dispersity up to very high monomer conversions and high degrees of ... [more ▼]

The controlled polymerization of vinyl acetate has been recently achieved by several techniques, but PVAc with targeted Mn and low dispersity up to very high monomer conversions and high degrees of polymerization was only obtained with Co(acac)2 as controlling agent in the so-called CMRP, a type of organometallic mediated radical polymerization (OMRP). Other techniques (including ATRP, ITP, TERP, and RAFT/MADIX) have shown a more or less pronounced slowdown in the polymerization kinetics, which was attributed to the higher strength of the C−X bond between the radical PVAc chain and the trapping agent (X) in the dormant species and to a consequent slower reactivation after a less frequent head-to-head monomer addition. The reason for the CMRP exception is clarified by the present contribution. First, a detailed investigation by 1H, 13C and multiplicity-edited HSQC and DEPT-135 NMR of the PVAc obtained by CMRP, in comparison with a regular polymer made by free radical polymerization under the same conditions, has revealed that Co(acac)2 does not significantly alter the fraction of head-to-head sequences in the polymer backbone and that there is no accumulation of Co(acac)2-capped chains with a head-to-head ω end. Hence, both dormant chains (following the head-to-head and the head-to-tail monomer additions) must be reactivated at similar rates. A DFT study shows that this is possible because the dormant chains are stabilized not only by the C−Co σ bond but also by formation of a chelate ring through coordination of the ω monomer carbonyl group. The head-to-head dormant chain contains an inherently stronger C−Co bond but forms a weaker 6-membered chelate ring, whereas the weaker C−Co bond in the head-to-tail dormant chain is compensated by a stronger 5-membered chelate ring. Combination of the two effects leads to similar activation enthalpies, as verified by DFT calculations using a variety of local, gradient-corrected, hybrid and “ad hoc” functionals (BPW91, B3PW91, BPW91*, M06 and M06L). While the BDE(C−X) of model H-VAc−X molecules [X = Cl, I, MeTe, EtOC(S)S and Co(acac)2] are functional dependent, the BDE difference between head-to-head and head-to-tail dormant chain models is almost functional insensitive, with values of 5−9 kcal/mol for the ATRP, ITP and TERP models, 3−6 for the RAFT/MADIX model, and around zero for CMRP. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of health related quality of life on reported use of health care resources in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a longitudinal analysis.
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Kahler, Kristijan H; Kong, Sheldon X et al

in Journal of Rheumatology (2002), 29(6), 1147-55

OBJECTIVE: In today's cost conscious environment, health services researchers are consistently trying to find ways to predict future health care resource utilization (HCRU) and its associated costs. We ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: In today's cost conscious environment, health services researchers are consistently trying to find ways to predict future health care resource utilization (HCRU) and its associated costs. We evaluated the impact of health related quality of life (HRQL) on future HCRU in patients with arthritis. METHODS: A total of 642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 395 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) completed at least 2 and as many as 6 consecutive surveys at 6 mo intervals. Information collected included demographics, HRQL questionnaires [Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)], and HCRU over the previous 6 months. Longitudinal data analysis was perfomed to assess the effect of HRQL on future HCRU. RESULTS: Statistically significant associations between HCRU and HRQL variables were noted. Higher rates of HCRU were found in those in the worst quarter compared with those in the best quarter of HRQL. With the HAQ, OA and RA patients in the worst quarter reported a 199% (p < 0.05) and 48% (p < 0.05) increase in rheumatologist visits, respectively. With the WOMAC Function, increases were as high as 196% (p < 0.05) in rheumatologist visits for patients with OA. Patients with RA with a high level of HRQL as measured by the SF-36 (physical component score) reported a decrease of 31% (p < 0.01) in general practitioner visits and a decrease of 52% (p < 0.01) in hospitalization (mental component score). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that HRQL may be used to predict future health care consumption. Such an approach may lead to a more efficient allocation of resources by providing useful information to health care providers and health care decision makers. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of heart failure on dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity in plasma of dogs.
Gomez, N.; Matheeussen, V.; Damoiseaux, Cécile ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2012)

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See detailThe effect of heat stress on freeze-drying and conservation of Lactococcus
Ziadi, M.; Touhami, Y.; Achour, M. et al

in Biochemical Engineering Journal (2005), 24(2), 141-145

The production of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tunisian fermented milk (Lben): Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis var. diacetylactis (SLT6) was investigated in fed-batch process. The final biomass ... [more ▼]

The production of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tunisian fermented milk (Lben): Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis var. diacetylactis (SLT6) was investigated in fed-batch process. The final biomass production was 2.2710(11) cfu/ml. The effect of heat stress, after fermentation, on the survival rate after freeze-drying and during storage was studied. The survival rate after freeze-drying of SLT6 subject of a thermal treatment was 38.8% whereas it was only 21.9% for unprocessed SLT6. The accelerated shelf life testing (ASLT) method was used to study the effect of heat stress on conservation of Lactococcus. The bacterium was stored at four different temperatures of 4, 15, 25 and 37 degrees C. Lactococcus cell kinetic behaviour suggested a first order reaction, and the effect of storage temperature was quantified by determination of the half-life period and the activation energy. The beneficial effect of heat stress is clearly associated with a half-life period of 86 days for SLT6T and only 48 days four SLT6NT stored at 4 degrees C. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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