Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes delay release the verbal overshadowing effect in child and adult eyewitnesses?
Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in Perception (2012), 41(supplement), 194

The verbal overshadowing effect (VO) (eg, Schooler and Engstler-Schooler, 1990 Cognitive Psychology 22(1) 36–71) suggests that the fact of generating a verbal description of a previously seen face may ... [more ▼]

The verbal overshadowing effect (VO) (eg, Schooler and Engstler-Schooler, 1990 Cognitive Psychology 22(1) 36–71) suggests that the fact of generating a verbal description of a previously seen face may impair subsequent performance on a lineup identification task in adults. Previous research has examined whether descriptions also impaired children’s identification abilities but no evidence of VO was found (Memon and Rose, 2002 Psychology, Crime and Law 8(3), 229–242). However, the method might not have been appropriate to observe this effect as, for instance, a 24-hour delay between the description and the identification tasks (associated with a release of the VO effect in adults) was used. Hence, in this current experiment, groups of children (7–8, 10–11, 13–14 years old) and adults were presented with a short video and then assigned to a description or a no description condition before the identification task. Participants were also assigned either to a “no delay”, a “24-hour post encoding delay” or a “24-hour post description delay” condition to determine the influence of delay on the VO effect. Results indicated that, compared to the control condition, the description decreased correct identification performance in both children and adults and no release of VO was found with delay. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes domestication process affect stress response in juvenile Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis ?
Douxfils, Jessica; Mandiki, S. N. M.; Marotte, Grégory et al

in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. A : Comparative Physiology (2011), 159

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes drawing faces make you a super-expert of faces? An investigation of face perception and recognition abilities in visual artists.
Devue, Christel ULg; Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2012, September 01)

Face recognition abilities might constitute a continuum with developmental prosopagnosia and outstanding face recognition capacity at each extreme. 'Super-recognizers' display better face processing ... [more ▼]

Face recognition abilities might constitute a continuum with developmental prosopagnosia and outstanding face recognition capacity at each extreme. 'Super-recognizers' display better face processing abilities than controls and show a larger face inversion effect (FIE) [Russell et al, 2009, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16 (2), 252-257]. Hence, FIE could reflect a specific visual experience/expertise with faces compared to other objects rather than a qualitatively different kind of processing. In this experiment we tested face processing abilities of visual artists who practice portraiture, as well as more general visual perception and recognition skills, in order to contribute to the long-lasting debate about a possible special status of faces. If some special processing faces benefit from is due to expertise, artists' practice might lead to better perceptual and possibly recognition performance with upright faces compared to controls, while increasing the FIE. Because they need to take both configural and featural information into account to reach a satisfactory likeness, artists might also make a differential use of these facial cues compared to controls. Preliminary data indicate that face processing performance might indeed be linked to perceptual expertise with faces. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes echocardiographic stress test induced release of hsTnT and TnI II?
Le Goff, Caroline ULg; Laurent, Terry; Garweg, Christophe ULg et al

in Clinical Chemistry (2010, July), 56(S6), 128

Background: Cardiac troponins (cTn) are considered as the best biomarkers for detection of myocardial cell injury. In this study, cTnT and cTnI were measured by new commercially available high-sensitive ... [more ▼]

Background: Cardiac troponins (cTn) are considered as the best biomarkers for detection of myocardial cell injury. In this study, cTnT and cTnI were measured by new commercially available high-sensitive methods in patients undergoing brief exercise- or pharmacologicinduced stress. Our aim was to compare cTnT and cTnI levels before and after the stress tests, in the patients with or without reversible ischemia. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients (28 men and 22 women) underwent an echographic stress test (ST) for suspected ischemic heart disease. Of these 50 patients, 28 received pharmacological ST (dobutamine injection) and 22 dynamic ST (bicycle exercise). The patients were subdivided into two groups according to the presence or absence of documented transient reversible ischemia: 14 with reversible ischemia ( mean age: 67.71±9.66 y) and 36 without ischemia ( mean age: 63.17±11.72 y). In all patients, cTnT and cTnI concentrations were measured by high sensitive methods (hsTnT, Roche Diagnostics and TnI II, Abbott Diagnostics) on heparin plasma immediately before (T0) and after ST (T1).The lower detection limit of these assays was 0.005μg/L for hsTnT and 0.01μg/L for TnI II. The protocol was approved by the ethics committee of the University of Liège (Belgium). All patients gave informed consent. All statistical analyses were performed using Medcalc version 8.1 for Windows. P value <0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference between hsTnT concentrations at T0 and T1, neither in the whole patient group, nor in the subgroups of subjects who received pharmacological ST or dynamic ST. The same was true for TnI II. Although there was no change in hsTnT levels during test in ischemic and in non ischemic patients, the latter tend to demonstrate higher median T0 levels (25th, 75th percentiles) than the others [0.011 (0.007, 0.029) vs 0.007 (0.0047, 0.1125) ng/ml, p=0.09]. They also showed higher median T1 levels [0.014 (0.065, 0.03) vs 0.007 (0.003, 0.0102) ng/ml, p=0.08]. Higher TnI II levels were also recorded in ischemic patients as compared to non ischemic patients at T0[ 0.014 (0.0072; 0.0265) vs 0.005 (0.003; 0.01) ng/ml, p=0.08] and T1[ 0.013 (0.0085- 0.03) vs 0.006 (0.0035-0.008) ng/ml, p=0.08]. Also, TnI II levels did not change during test in both subgroups. Conclusions: Measurement of cardiac troponins by high sensitive methods did not allow to detect significant release of biomarkers from the heart during exercise-or pharmacologic-induced ST, even in patients who demonstrated reversible myocardial ischemia. The type of test – pharmacological or dynamic - was without effect. The patients with induced transient ischemia had however higher troponin T and I levels at baseline, this difference remaining during test. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes edge effect influence Bonobos, Pan paniscus, forest use dynamics: a case study in a forest-savannah mosaic of West DR Congo
Serckx, Adeline ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg

Conference (2012)

Our study helps understand how fragmented forests affect bonobos forest use. Previous studies already reveal that habitat types influence bonobos’ densities, but forests’ spatial structure could also have ... [more ▼]

Our study helps understand how fragmented forests affect bonobos forest use. Previous studies already reveal that habitat types influence bonobos’ densities, but forests’ spatial structure could also have an impact. In the current context of deforestation and increasing illegal concessions, approaching such questions should help orient future conservation programs. We focus on the influence of edge effect on bonobos forest use, presuming that they avoid areas with non mature forests and increased human pressure. We travelled along transects (113km total) to define habitat types and to record bonobos indices (tracks, food remains and nesting sites) in 200km² of forests in Southwestern Lake Tumba Region. Our results show that bonobos clearly prefer specific habitats for nesting, and, within these nest-forest types, an understory of Marantaceae Haumania sp. is preferentially chosen. To evaluate edge effect on nesting behavior, we counted nesting sites in 100m distance classes from the forest edge. Our results indicate a uniform distribution of nesting sites, but with a negative edge effect in the first 100m. When we analyzed tracks and food remains distribution, we didn’t find any habitat type preferences or any edge effect. These results indicate that, although bonobos are known to favor dense forests, they can also adapt to fragmented forests environment. Habitat types appear to be more relevant to understand their distribution and range. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes electrical stimulation of knee extensor and flexor muscles induce DOMS?
Vanderthommen, Marc ULg; Triffaux, Mylène; Demoulin, Christophe ULg et al

in Loland, S.; Fasting, K.; Hallen, J. (Eds.) et al Book of Abstracts of 14th annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science (2009, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes environmental exposure to cadmium represent a health risk? Conclusions from the Cadmibel Study.
Lauwerys, R.; Bernard, A.; Buchet, J.-P. et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1991), 46

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDoes Export Controls Regimes could Contribute to Counter the Acquisition of WMD by Sub-national ?,
Michel, Quentin ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique. Sciences (2003)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes F2 need a hard pomeron?
Cudell, Jean-René ULg; Soyez, G.

in Physics Letters B (2001), 516

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes feeding dairy cattle with different levels of condensed distillers solubles (Protiwanze®) increase the risk of Sara?
Lessire, Françoise ULg; Rollin, Frédéric ULg

Poster (2011, September 08)

INTRODUCTION The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different levels of Protiwanze® (PW) supplementation, a highly acid (pH = 3.8 ± 0.8) and fermentescible CDS, on ruminal function of ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different levels of Protiwanze® (PW) supplementation, a highly acid (pH = 3.8 ± 0.8) and fermentescible CDS, on ruminal function of dairy cows. MATERIAL AND METHODS PW supplementation was tested in 5 dairy herds (144 cows, DIM: 96 ± 61, daily milk production: 34.69 ± 8.22 L). In Herd 1, TMR was supplemented with 0% or 10% of PW on a dry matter basis for 4 weeks including a 7-day transition period. Each concentration was distributed twice during 2 periods alternatively with the other one, each cow being its own control. PW concentrations were 10 and 15% in Herd 2, 3 and 4. During every period, milk production was measured by the Dairy Herd Improvement and ruminal fluid sampled by a stomach tube (Ruminator®) on 5 cows. Samples were assessed for pH (portable pH meter), redox potential (Methylene blue test) and protozoa (optical microscopy). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Ruminal pH values ranged between 5.94 and 7.74. Even when a correction factor of 0.5 was applied to take into account possible saliva contamination, only 8 pH samples pleaded for SARA although protozoa and methylene blue tests were within norms and cows clinically normal. No significant correlation between pH value, milk production and fat content could be demonstrated. Ruminal pH did neither significantly differ between the different levels of PW supplementation. In conclusion, in this study, PW could be used in dairy cows TMR at a level as high as 15% without increasing the risk of SARA. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes fluid intelligence protect from age-related decline in cognitive control ?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Proceedings of the BAPS - SEPEX meeting (2012, May 11)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence capacity on the age ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence capacity on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. The main results revealed significant effects of age and fluid intelligence capacity on sensitivity to interference. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, older participants with similar level of fluid intelligence to young adults showed no proactive control age-related decrement. Beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that the level of fluid intelligence influences the efficiency of proactive control in aging. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (16 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes fluid intelligence protect from age-related decline in cognitive control ?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Poster (2012, June 25)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence capacity on the age ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence capacity on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. The main results revealed significant effects of age and fluid intelligence capacity on sensitivity to interference. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, older participants with similar level of fluid intelligence to young adults showed no proactive control age-related decrement. Beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that the level of fluid intelligence influences the efficiency of proactive control in aging. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes foraging plasticity favours adaptation to new habitats in fire salamanders? Preliminary data
Manenti, Raoul; Denoël, Mathieu ULg; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

Conference (2013, August 23)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDoes formal child care availability for 0-3 year olds boost mothers' employment rate? Panel data based evidence from Belgium
Dujardin, Claire; Fonder, Muriel; Lejeune, Bernard ULg

E-print/Working paper (2015)

In 2003, a new multi-annual program aimed at increasing the availability of formal child care for 0-3 year old children was launched in Wallonia, the French-speaking part of Belgium. This paper is ... [more ▼]

In 2003, a new multi-annual program aimed at increasing the availability of formal child care for 0-3 year old children was launched in Wallonia, the French-speaking part of Belgium. This paper is interested in evaluating if this increased availability of formal child care resulted in a higher employment rate for women with at least one child under 3. To this end, we use a difference-in-differences approach based on municipality-level panel data, taking advantage of the fact that the increase in availability of formal child care differed greatly across municipalities. We find that the raise in child care availability significantly increased the maternal employment rate, but to a lesser extent than expected, most likely because of a substantial crowding-out effect. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (5 ULg)
See detailDoes high school program choice affect academic performance? Evidence for Economics
Lefevre, Mélanie ULg

Conference (2015, April 02)

This study evaluates the impact of the choice of the Economics elective course in secondary school on the performance in Economics at the University level. While several studies look at the impact on ... [more ▼]

This study evaluates the impact of the choice of the Economics elective course in secondary school on the performance in Economics at the University level. While several studies look at the impact on performance of the number of hours of mathematics in secondary school, less has been made regarding the impact of the secondary school Economics program. We match survey data from 360 students enrolled in the first year of the bachelors program in HEC-Management School of University of Liège, with administrative data and exam results. The methodological challenge is that students who choose Economics elective course in secondary school are likely to be different, in terms of motivation, from other students. To get rid of this potential bias, we approximate motivation using self-reported reasons for the choice of the elective courses, but also participation to non-mandatory tests and preparations before the exam. We also control for several individual characteristics (socio-economic background, age, gender, secondary school fixed effect, etc.) in order to compare students with similar abilities. Preliminary analysis shows that students who have chosen Economics elective course in the last year of secondary school do not perform better, or worse, at their University Economics exam, when controlling for the number of hours of mathematics they had in secondary school, as well as other individual characteristics. However, they are less likely to report their bachelor Economics course as being “difficult”. Overconfidence of students with higher previous economic knowledge may explain why they do not perform better than their peers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes Imidacloprid Seed-Treated Maize Have an Impact on Honey Bee Mortality?
Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; PIRARD, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Economic Entomology (2009), 102(2), 616-623

Beekeepers suspected maize. Zea mays L., treated with imidacloprid to result in substantial loss of honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies in Belgium. The objective of this study was to investigate the ... [more ▼]

Beekeepers suspected maize. Zea mays L., treated with imidacloprid to result in substantial loss of honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies in Belgium. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential impact of maize grown from imidacloprid-treated seeds on honey bee mortality. A survey of 16 apiaries was carried out, and all maize fields treated or not with imidacloprid were located within a radius of 3,000 m around the observed apiaries. Samples of honey, beeswax, and bees were collected in three colonies per apiary and analyzed for pesticide contain by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We first found significant correlation between the number of colonies per apiary and the mortality rates in an apiary. In addition, this mortality rate was inversely correlated with the surface of maize fields treated and not with imidacloprid, suggesting that this pesticide do not interact with bees fitness. Moreover, a very large number of our samples contained acarcides either prohibited or ineffective against varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) (Acari: Varroidae), suggesting that the treatment method used by the beekeepers to be inadequate for mite control. Our results support the hypothesis that imidacloprid seed-treated maize has no negative impact on honey bees. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 434 (52 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes implicit memory during anaesthesia persist in children?
Lopez, Ursula; Habre, w; Laurencon, M. et al

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2009), 102(3), 37984

Background. Recent studies suggest that implicit memory (especially perceptual implicit memory) persists during adequate general anaesthesia in adults. Studies in children, however, have failed to ... [more ▼]

Background. Recent studies suggest that implicit memory (especially perceptual implicit memory) persists during adequate general anaesthesia in adults. Studies in children, however, have failed to demonstrate implicit memory during general anaesthesia, possibly because of differences in methodological design. We therefore designed a prospective study with the aim of evaluating implicit memory in children undergoing general anaesthesia, using a perceptual memory test based on the mere exposure effect, previously tested in a control group. Methods. Twelve infrequent neutral words were played 12 times in a random sequence via headphones to 36 children aged 8–12 yr during elective or emergency surgery. The children were not premedicated, and general anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane. The word presentation started immediately after the surgical incision. Within 36 h after the stimulus presentation, the memory was assessed by using a forced-choice preference judgement task. Time constraint and word deterioration with a low-pass filter were used to prevent the subjects from utilizing intentional retrieval. The implicit memory score was obtained by calculating the proportion of target words preferred, which was compared with the chance level (0.5). Results. The percentage of correct responses given by the children was comparable with the chance level. The memory score was mean (SD) 0.48 (0.16) (95% CI 0.43–0.53). Conclusions. The use of a perceptual implicit memory test based on the mere exposure procedure in children failed to reveal any evidence of implicit memory under general anaesthesia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (9 ULg)