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See detailDoes Retirement Affect Cognitive Functioning?
Bonsang, Eric; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Perelman, Sergio ULg

in Journal of Health Economics (2012), 31

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See detailDoes Retirement Affect Cognitive Functioning?
Bonsang, Eric; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Perelman, Sergio ULg

Report (2010)

This paper analyzes the effect of retirement on cognitive functioning using two large scale surveys. On the one hand the HRS, a longitudinal survey among individuals aged 50+ living in the United States ... [more ▼]

This paper analyzes the effect of retirement on cognitive functioning using two large scale surveys. On the one hand the HRS, a longitudinal survey among individuals aged 50+ living in the United States, allows us to control for individual heterogeneity and endogeneity of the retirement decision by using the eligibility age for Social Security as an instrument. On the other hand, a comparable international European survey, SHARE, allows us to identify the causal effect of retirement on cognitive functioning by using the cross-country differences in the age-pattern of retirement. The results highlight in both cases a significant negative, and quantitatively comparable, effect of retirement on cognitive functioning. Our results suggest that promoting labor force participation of older workers is not only desirable to insure the viability of retirement schemes, but it could also delay cognitive decline, and thus the occurrence of associated impairments at older age. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes Retirement Affect Cognitive Functioning?
Perelman, Sergio ULg; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Bonsang, Eric

in Journal of Health Economics (2012), 31

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See detailDoes Retirement Affect Cognitive Functioning?
Bonsang, Eric; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Perelman, Sergio ULg

Conference (2010, July 16)

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See detailDoes reward unpredictability reflect risk?
Anselme, Patrick ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2015), 280(1), 119-127

Most decisions made in real-life situations are risky because they are associated with possible negative consequences. Current models of decision-making postulate that the occasional, unpredictable ... [more ▼]

Most decisions made in real-life situations are risky because they are associated with possible negative consequences. Current models of decision-making postulate that the occasional, unpredictable absence of reward that may result from free choice is a negative consequence interpreted as risk by organisms in laboratory situations. I argue that such a view is difficult to justify because, in most experimental paradigms, reward omission does not represent a cost for the decision maker. Risk only exists when unpredictability may cause a potential loss of own limited resources, whether energetic, social, financial, and so on. Thus the experimental methodologies used to test humans and non-humans relative to risk-taking seem to be limited to studying the effects of reward uncertainty in the absence of true decision cost. This may have important implications for the conclusions that can be drawn with respect to the neurobehavioural determinants of risk-taking in real-life situations. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes rheumatoid arthritis induce bone loss per se ?
Wouters, M; Francois, A; Schoutens, A et al

in Medical Science Research (1988), 16

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See detailDoes salt restriction lower the intracellular calcium concentration in essential hypertension?
Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg; Du, F.; Rorive, Georges ULg

in Journal of Hypertension (Supplement) (1992), 10

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See detailDoes Saturn's UV aurora vary with SKR phase?
Nichols, J. D.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Clarke, J. T. et al

Conference (2009, July 27)

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See detailDoes sector-specific experience matter? The case of European higher education ministers
Lefebvre, Mathieu ULg; Jacqmin, Julien

E-print/Working paper (2015)

This paper looks at the relationship between higher education ministers and the performance of the sector that they govern. Using an original panel dataset with the characteristics of European higher ... [more ▼]

This paper looks at the relationship between higher education ministers and the performance of the sector that they govern. Using an original panel dataset with the characteristics of European higher education ministers, we find that having a past experience in the sector leads to a higher level of performance, as measured by ranking data. Making a parallel with the literature about the impact of education on the educated, we discuss potential explanations behind the impact of this on-the-job learning experience. As we find that this characteristic has no impact on the spendings of the sector, we argue that this academic experience makes them more prone to introduce adequate reforms. Furthermore, we find that this result is driven by ministers with both this sector-specific and an electoral experience, the latter measured by a succesful election at the regional or national level. This tends to show that political credibility should not be overshadowed by the importance of the sector-specific experience of ministers. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes signalling pathways inhibition hold therapeutic promise for osteoarthritis?
Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Joint Bone Spine (2014), 81

Signalling pathways inhibition hold promise as therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis but safety concern may limit their use to the more sevre form of the disease.

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See detailDoes Size Affect Mutual Fund Performance? A General Approach
Sougné, Danielle ULg; Bodson, Laurent ULg; Cavenaile, Laurent

in Journal of Asset Management (2011), 12(3n), 163-171

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See detailDoes sleep promote false memories?
Darsaud, Annabelle; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Lahl, Olaf et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2011), 23(1), 26-40

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See detailDoes Social Innovation vary with the Organisational Form? Exploring the Diversity of Fair Trade Social Enterprises in Europe
Huybrechts, Benjamin ULg

Conference (2009, September)

A common view in the literature on social entrepreneurship and social enterprise is to highlight the fact that social innovation crosses the organizational forms. But does that social innovation should be ... [more ▼]

A common view in the literature on social entrepreneurship and social enterprise is to highlight the fact that social innovation crosses the organizational forms. But does that social innovation should be considered regardless of the organizational form? Fair Trade (FT) offers a quite interesting example of both a social innovation and a field in which diverse organizational forms coexist. My research questions are twofold: (1) what are the different types of organizational forms that underlie social innovation in the FT sector?; (2) do these different forms bring different types of social innovation? The methodology consists of interviews with the leaders of 57 Fair Trade Social Enterprises (FTSEs) in four European regions: Belgium, France (Rhône-Alpes), United Kingdom (England) and Italy (Rome). The findings show that the legal forms and governance models–the two elements of the organizational form considered here–can be combined into five categories of organizational forms: individual, manager-owned business, volunteer-based, multi-stakeholder cooperative and group. These categories seem to be linked, at least to a certain extent, to the age of the FTSE and to its goals. Certain forms seem to signal a particular type of social innovation. Volunteer-based FTSEs use education and advocacy as the main channel to pursue social change at the global level, and see the partnerships with the producers in the South as a vehicle to support the former goal. Individual and business-form FTSEs focus on offering benefits to the producers through a profitable commercial activity. And multi-stakeholder cooperatives and groups generally seek to combine both types of social innovation. However, nuances exist and lead to considering the organisational form as vehicles that may serve various purposes according to the context and the entrepreneurs’ profiles. I suggest three theoretical frameworks to interpret the diversity of organizational forms and its link with the logics of social innovation. Neo-institutional economics allow to see organizational diversity as the result of the production of different types of goods within the “FT bundle”. New institutionalism in organizational analysis emphasizes organizational diversity as the result of either weak (or non-existent) or multiple institutional logics. And institutional entrepreneurship highlights the ability of FTSEs to shape the environment in a way that legitimizes their own way of conceiving social innovation. I conclude that these three frameworks offer complementary explanations to organizational diversity and that the latter is an asset rather than an obstacle for carrying social innovation in multiple and complementary ways. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes spleen innervation influence TSE pathogenesis?
Jolois, Olivier ULg; Farquhar, Christine; Brown, Karen et al

Poster (2001)

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See detailDoes spleen innervation influence TSE pathogenesis?”
Jolois, Olivier ULg; Farquhar, Christine; Brown, Karen et al

Poster (2000)

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See detailDoes sulfide detoxication occur in the gills of the hydrothermal vent shrimp, Rimicaris exoculata?
Compère, Philippe ULg; Martinez, Anne-Sophie; Charmantier-Daures, Mireille et al

in Comptes Rendus Biologies (2002), 325

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See detailDoes sustained ERP activity in posterior lexico-semantic processing areas during short-term memory tasks only reflect activated long-term memory?
Majerus, Steve ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2003), 26(6), 746-747

We challenge Ruchkin et al.'s claim in reducing short-term memory (STM) to the active part of long-term memory (LTM), by showing that their data cannot rule out the possibility that activation of ... [more ▼]

We challenge Ruchkin et al.'s claim in reducing short-term memory (STM) to the active part of long-term memory (LTM), by showing that their data cannot rule out the possibility that activation of posterior brain regions could also reflect the contribution of a verbal STM buffer. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes the 43 bp sequence from an 800 000 year old Cretan dwarf elephantid really rewrite the textbook on mammoths?
Orlando, Ludovic; Pagès, Marie ULg; Calvignac, Sébastien et al

in Biology Letters (2007), 3

Pigmy elephants inhabited the islands from the Mediterranean region during the Pleistocene period but became extinct in the course of the Holocene. Despite striking distinctive anatomical characteristics ... [more ▼]

Pigmy elephants inhabited the islands from the Mediterranean region during the Pleistocene period but became extinct in the course of the Holocene. Despite striking distinctive anatomical characteristics related to insularity, some similarities with the lineage of extant Asian elephants have suggested that pigmy elephants could be most probably seen as members of the genus Elephas. Poulakakis et al. (2006) have recently challenged this view by recovering a short mtDNA sequence from an 800 000 year old fossil of the Cretan pigmy elephant (Elephas creticus). According to the authors of this study, a deep taxonomic revision of Cretan dwarf elephants would be needed, as the sequence exhibits clear affinities with woolly mammoth haplotypes. However, we point here many aspects that seriously weaken the strength of the ancient DNA evidence reported. [less ▲]

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