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See detailDepression alters "top-down" visual attention: a dynamic causal modeling comparison between depressed and healthy subjects.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Schwartz, Sophie; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2011), 54(2), 1662-8

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently demonstrated that nonmedicated patients with a first episode of unipolar major depression (MDD) compared to matched controls exhibited an ... [more ▼]

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently demonstrated that nonmedicated patients with a first episode of unipolar major depression (MDD) compared to matched controls exhibited an abnormal neural filtering of irrelevant visual information (Desseilles et al., 2009). During scanning, subjects performed a visual attention task imposing two different levels of attentional load at fixation (low or high), while task-irrelevant colored stimuli were presented in the periphery. In the present study, we focused on the visuo-attentional system and used "Dynamic Causal Modeling" (DCM) on the same dataset to assess how attention influences a network of three dynamically-interconnected brain regions (visual areas V1 and V4, and intraparietal sulcus (P), differentially in MDD patients and healthy controls. Bayesian model selection (BMS) and model space partitioning (MSP) were used to determine the best model in each population. The best model for the controls revealed that the increase of parietal activity by high attention load was selectively associated with a negative modulation of P on V4, consistent with high attention reducing the processing of irrelevant colored peripheral stimuli. The best model accounting for the data from the MDD patients showed that both low and high attention levels exerted modulatory effects on P. The present results document abnormal effective connectivity across visuo-attentional networks in MDD, which likely contributes to deficient attentional filtering of information. [less ▲]

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See detailDepression and autobiographical memory: which are the characteristics of depressed patients' self-defining memories?
Wagener, Aurélie ULg; Weigend, Alicia; Boulanger, Marie ULg et al

Poster (2014, January 13)

BACKGROUND. Depressed patients suffer from autobiographical memory deficits. Indeed, depressed patients present an overgeneralization and a mood congruence biases. Moreover, they seem to have difficulties ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND. Depressed patients suffer from autobiographical memory deficits. Indeed, depressed patients present an overgeneralization and a mood congruence biases. Moreover, they seem to have difficulties to recall positive memories. Our aim is to focus on a specific kind of memories called “self-defining memories” (SDM) which are highly pertinent for self-building. Their characteristics (e.g. specificity, meaning making) were assessed and compared to those of healthy subjects. HYPOTHESES. Depressed patients relate less specific and meaning making events than control group. A mood congruence bias is observed. METHOD. 17 depressed patients and 18 healthy subjects fulfilled SDM exercises: subjects were asked to relate six important events that happened in their life. These SDM were assessed on several variables: specificity, impact, meaning making, contain. Moreover, subjects were assessed on depression severity and self-esteem (explicit and implicit). RESULTS. No difference between depressed patients and healthy subjects has been found for specificity. A marginal effect appeared for meaning making: control group seemed to relate more meaning making events than depressed patients. Depressed patients related more negative events than control group: this negative emotional valence was positively correlated with higher depression severity. Depressed subjects presented a lower explicit self-esteem than healthy subjects but no difference has been found for implicit self-esteem. Higher explicit self-esteem was positively correlated with positive emotional valence of SDM. DISCUSSION. Results partially support our hypotheses. Experimental and clinical implications of our results will be discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 157 (17 ULg)
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See detailDepression and sleepiness: A chronobiological approach
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Cajochen, Christian

in Thorpy, Michael; Billiard, Michael (Eds.) Sleepiness Causes, Consequences and Treatment (2011)

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See detailDepression and socio-econornic risk factors: 7-year longitudinal population study
Lorant, V.; Croux, C.; Weich, S. et al

in British Journal of Psychiatry (2007), 190

Background Low socio-economic status is associated with a higher prevalence of depression, but it is not yet known whether change in socio-economic status leads to a change in rates of depression. Aims To ... [more ▼]

Background Low socio-economic status is associated with a higher prevalence of depression, but it is not yet known whether change in socio-economic status leads to a change in rates of depression. Aims To assess whether longitudinal change in socio-economic factors affects change of depression level. Method In a prospective cohort study using the annual Belgian Household Panel Survey (1992-1999), depression was assessed using the Global Depression Scale. Socio-economic factors were assessed with regard to material standard of living, education, employment status and social relationships. Results A lowering in material standard of living between annual waves was associated with increases in depressive symptoms and caseness of major depression. Life circumstances also influenced depression. Ceasing to cohabit with a partner increased depressive symptoms and caseness, and improvement in circumstances reduced them; the negative effects were stronger than the positive ones. Conclusions The study showed a clear relationship between worsening socioeconomic circumstances and depression. [less ▲]

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See detailLa dépression bipolaire : La face cachée de l'iceberg
Souery, Daniel; Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Floris, Michel et al

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2005), 105

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See detailLa dépression chez l'adolescent: Mieux comprendre pour mieux agir
Boulard, Aurore ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

La dépression à l’adolescence fait depuis quelques années l’objet d’études épidémiologiques. Chez les adolescents, les taux de prévalence varient de 5 à 7% pour l’épisode dépressif majeur (EDM) et touche ... [more ▼]

La dépression à l’adolescence fait depuis quelques années l’objet d’études épidémiologiques. Chez les adolescents, les taux de prévalence varient de 5 à 7% pour l’épisode dépressif majeur (EDM) et touche deux fois plus de filles que de garçons. Selon une estimation, deux tiers d’entre eux ne seraient pas médicalement et/ou psychologiquement soignés. Pourtant les conséquences de ces épisodes dépressifs sont nombreuses et graves: troubles du caractère, échecs scolaires, conduites suicidaires. Un rapport récent de l’OMS montre qu’à l’heure actuelle, la dépression chez les adolescents âgés de 12 à 19 ans est la première cause de maladie et de handicap. Face à ce constat, il est de la plus haute importance de mieux comprendre cette maladie qui ne s’exprime pas de la même manière qu’à l’âge adulte et se confond régulièrement avec la « crise d’adolescence » afin de pouvoir prendre en charge ces adolescents et les aider. [less ▲]

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See detailLa dépression chez les mères adolescentes : pour un repérage des situations de vulnérabilité
Noirhomme-Renard, Florence ULg; Aujoulat, Isabelle; Gosset, Christiane ULg

in Neuropsychiatrie de l'Enfance et de l'Adolescence (2013), 61

Introduction and objectives Due to the high frequency and co-occurrence of vulnerabilities, mothers under 20 years are at higher risk of perinatal depression than adults mothers. We performed a review of ... [more ▼]

Introduction and objectives Due to the high frequency and co-occurrence of vulnerabilities, mothers under 20 years are at higher risk of perinatal depression than adults mothers. We performed a review of the literature investigating the epidemiology of adolescents mothers’ depression, compared these data to adult mothers and listed associated factors, to develop a more preventive approach and specific follow-up. Methods The review is based on Pubmed and Sciencedirect research combining “adolescent” or “teenage” and “depression” as keywords. Results Seventeen international studies were included, evaluating both prenatal (6 studies) and postnatal (14 studies) depression with three different scales (CES-D, BDI, EPDS). Depression rate in adolescents mothers varies from 26 to 63% in the third trimester of pregnancy and from 26 to 61% in the first 3 months postpartum, with differences depending of studies designs, screening instruments and cut-offs. Depression rate declines with time, but still persists with a prevalence ranging from 21 to 32% at 4 to 5 years after delivery. Depression rate in adolescent mothers are globally twice higher than in adult mothers, both in prenatal and postnatal periods. Characteristics associated with adolescent mothers depression include sociodemographic factors (less education, low income), psychosocial factors (confidence, self-esteem), poor or inadequate social support and negative life events (violence exposure, history of abuse). Conclusion Perinatal depression in adolescent mothers is very high and can contribute negatively to child-mother interaction. It should be a priority to screen depression early during pregnancy and to offer appropriate support services during the first years of motherhood. Moreover, it could be of high interest to assess maternofoetal attachment during pregnancy using validated instruments combined with depression scales. [less ▲]

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See detailLa dépression comment y faire face ?
Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Scientific conference (2012, November 08)

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See detailDépression en images : nouvelles perspectives en neuroimagerie et implications cliniques
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2012, September 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
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See detailLa dépression est une complication fréquente du lupus érythémateux disséminé : considérations épidémiologiques, pathogéniques et thérapeutiques
Lemaire, Benoît ULg; Geron, Donatienne ULg; MALAISE, Olivier ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2015), 70(4), 215-218

Le lupus érythémateux disséminé (LED) est une maladie de système aux conséquences aussi multiples qu’invalidantes. La prévalence des épisodes dépressifs majeurs y est significativement supérieure à celle ... [more ▼]

Le lupus érythémateux disséminé (LED) est une maladie de système aux conséquences aussi multiples qu’invalidantes. La prévalence des épisodes dépressifs majeurs y est significativement supérieure à celle des sujets sains ou atteints d’autres pathologies inflammatoires. S’il est évident que le statut de maladie chronique au dénouement souvent péjoratif et le nombre de traitements qu’elle impose constituent des facteurs favorisants, il est probable que les mécanismes pathogéniques du LED occasionnent une atteinte cérébrale précipitant une symptomatologie dépressive. Cet article approfondit les liens entre LED et dépression à travers des notions épidémiologiques, étiopathogéniques et thérapeutiques. [less ▲]

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See detailDépression et diabète de type 2. Analyse étiopathogènique d'une comorbidité fréquente
LUPPENS, David ULg; PIETTE, Catherine ULg; RADERMECKER, Régis ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(11), 611-617

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See detailDépression et maladies coronariennes: quand les émotions nous brisent le coeur...
Massart, Nicolas ULg; Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2005), 60(12), 931-8

Depression and cardiovascular diseases represent a major public health problem worldwide. Recent studies have shown that depression is a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) in ... [more ▼]

Depression and cardiovascular diseases represent a major public health problem worldwide. Recent studies have shown that depression is a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) in healthy people and also increases morbidity and mortality in depressed patients with CAD. Others studies have shown that selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs) constitute a safe and effective treatment for depressed patients with heart disease. There are also data suggesting that treating depression with SSRIs has a protective role in myocardial infarction and may improve outcomes, including mortality. [less ▲]

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See detailDépression et neuroplasticité.
Pitchot, William ULg; Polis, Marie-Hélène ULg; Belachew, Shibeshih ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

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See detailDépression et suicide : Aspects biologiques
ANSSEAU, Marc ULg; PITCHOT, William ULg

in Neuro-psy (1998)

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See detailDepression in tension-type headache sufferers: bystander or villain?
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Pain (2004), 111(3), 225-225

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See detailDepression in Women and in Men: Differences on Behavioral Avoidance and on Behavioral Activation
Wagener, Aurélie ULg; Baeyens, Céline; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2015, August 06)

Depression is a well-known disorder characterized by e.g. sadness, loss of interest and pleasure, feelings of guilt or worthlessness. Depression is also characterized by a decrease of the level of ... [more ▼]

Depression is a well-known disorder characterized by e.g. sadness, loss of interest and pleasure, feelings of guilt or worthlessness. Depression is also characterized by a decrease of the level of engagement in activities also conceptualized as behavioral avoidance. Indeed, depressed patients less and less engage themselves in pleasurable activities (e.g. they spend more and more time in their bed, see their friends more rarely). Reciprocally, this decrease of the level of engagement in activities reinforces and maintains depressive symptoms. This relationship between depression and a low level of engagement in activities is well-established in the scientific literature but no study has, until now, discussed the reasons of this decrease of engagement in activities. According to theoretical models of depression (Beck, 2008; Lewinsohn, 1985; Watkins, 2009), five sets of psychological processes (PP) are involved in depressive symptomatology: negative repetitive thoughts, maladaptive emotion regulation strategies, low environmental rewards, negative self-image and inhibition. We hypothesize that these PP could be considered as explaining factors of the behavioral avoidance. Furthermore, we hypothesize that other PP could be considered as explaining factors of the behavioral activation (adaptive emotion regulation strategies, high environmental rewards, positive self-image, approach and high self-clarity). Then, our aim is to assess the links between behavioral avoidance as well as activation and the PP mentioned above. In order to reach this objective, we developed a model of these links based on the psychological model of mental ill-health of Kinderman (2005, 2013). According to this model, biological, social and circumstantial factors lead to mental disorders through their conjoint effects on psychological processes. Furthermore, because depression is different in women and in men, we assessed the adequacy of our model according to the sex. Clinical and community adults completed an online survey assessing the psychological processes mentioned above, avoidance and activation. Since several questionnaires were used to assess each PP, factorial scores were computed for each one. Preliminary analyses (confirmatory factor analyses) were realized with a sample of 393 women and 139 men. The results revealed differences between men and women. For women, on the one hand, low levels of environmental rewards, maladaptive emotion regulation strategies and negative repetitive thoughts are linked to behavioral avoidance, and on the other hand, high levels of environmental rewards and positive self-image are linked to behavioral activation. For men, on the one hand, negative self-image, maladaptive emotion regulation strategies and low environmental rewards are linked to behavioral avoidance, and, on the other hand, high levels of environmental rewards and positive self-image are linked to behavioral activation. The final results will be presented during the convention, as data-collection is on-going and will end in May 2015. Clinical implications of these results will also be discussed such as the relevance of working on the levels of environmental rewards. [less ▲]

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See detailDépression majeure et prescription personnalisée
PITCHOT, William ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2015)

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See detailla dépression maternelle en post-partum: actualisation et points pratiques
Battisti, Oreste ULg; Emonts, Patrick ULg

in colloque de l'EPU-Ulg (2012, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (20 ULg)