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See detailDix sites Internet d'usage frequent en medecine generale
Sepulchre, Christophe; Bouniton, Marc ULg; Collette, Georges ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2006), 61(5-6), 520-37

Internet use is booming worldwide. The general practitioner can find on the Web a significant help for his research of information, as well as for his medical practice and the administrative management of ... [more ▼]

Internet use is booming worldwide. The general practitioner can find on the Web a significant help for his research of information, as well as for his medical practice and the administrative management of his office. The proportion of general practitioners who make use of Internet in their professional life is constantly increasing, but their major difficulty remains to know where to quickly find the reliable information. The purpose of this paper is to describe ten Websites of particular interest in general practice. [less ▲]

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See detailLe dix-neuvième siècle, hélas. Sartre, entre romantisme et modernité
Denis, Benoît ULg

in Romantisme (2006), (131), 75-86

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See detailDjôyes èt Rascrauwes
Matterne, Henry; Baiwir, Esther ULg; George, Victor

Book published by Société de Langue et de Littérature Wallonnes (2012)

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See detailDL 44 : Methodology and setup of the adopted groundwater vulnerability assessment method
Beaujean, Jean ULg; Wojda, Piotr; Gardin, Nicolas et al

Report (2008)

The objectives of this deliverable DL44 are to finalize the description of the global groundwater vulnerability assessment methodology, in particular : (1) to propose an extension of the concept of ... [more ▼]

The objectives of this deliverable DL44 are to finalize the description of the global groundwater vulnerability assessment methodology, in particular : (1) to propose an extension of the concept of sensitivity coefficient to vulnerability coefficient by introducing a ratio (distance to damage ratio) that reflects the “distance” between the current state of degradation of the water resource system and the “damaged state”,(2) To describe the methodology proposed to combine, through aggregation of spatiallydistributed indicators and multi criteria analysis, the different vulnerability coefficientsinto a single indicator of groundwater vulnerability for decision making, (3) To go further into the analysis and discussion of several key theoretical “case studies” for illustrating the way to setup the full methodology, from the DPSIR analysis to the expression of sensitivity and vulnerability coefficients. [less ▲]

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See detailDL 45 : Application and validation of the general methodology and concept of groundwater vulnerability assessment at regional scale on the Israeli coastal aquifer
Beaujean, Jean ULg; Lemieux, Jean-Michel; Brouyère, Serge ULg

Report (2008)

This deliverable consists in applying the concepts and methodologies developed in Deliverable D43 and D44 to synthetic and real case studies. Our researches have focused on the generalized groundwater ... [more ▼]

This deliverable consists in applying the concepts and methodologies developed in Deliverable D43 and D44 to synthetic and real case studies. Our researches have focused on the generalized groundwater vulnerability assessment methodology, and more precisely on evaluating, under the framework of physically-based indicators, the groundwater sensitivity/vulnerability to stress factor considering artificial recharge as a potential response to the degradation of the groundwater resource. In the context, different approaches have been identified in the literature and implemented in appropriate modelling tools (i.e. HydroGeoSphere) for calculating the various sensitivity/vulnerability coefficients. These approaches are the influence coefficient method, the sensitivity equation method and the adjoint operator method. The two first methods show relevant results on both the considered synthetic case studies that relate groundwater vulnerability to (1) quantity issues and (2) to sea water intrusion. They illustrate the way of applying the methodology to “real case studies”.These first applications should be the object of more complex but strongly related case studies. [less ▲]

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See detailDMFSGD: A Decentralized Matrix Factorization Algorithm for Network Distance Prediction
Liao, Yongjun ULg; Du, Wei; Geurts, Pierre ULg et al

in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking (2013), 21(5), 1511-1524

The knowledge of end-to-end network distances is essential to many Internet applications. As active probing of all pairwise distances is infeasible in large-scale networks, a natural idea is to measure a ... [more ▼]

The knowledge of end-to-end network distances is essential to many Internet applications. As active probing of all pairwise distances is infeasible in large-scale networks, a natural idea is to measure a few pairs and to predict the other ones without actually measuring them. This paper formulates the prediction problem as matrix completion where the unknown entries in a pairwise distance matrix constructed from a network are to be predicted. By assuming that the distance matrix has a low-rank characteristics, the problem is solvable by lowrank approximation based on matrix factorization. The new formulation circumvents the well-known drawbacks of existing approaches based on Euclidean embedding. A new algorithm, so-called Decentralized Matrix Factorization by Stochastic Gradient Descent (DMFSGD), is proposed. By letting network nodes exchange messages with each other, the algorithm is fully decentralized and only requires each node to collect and to process local measurements, with neither explicit matrix constructions nor special nodes such as landmarks and central servers. In addition, we compared comprehensively matrix factorization and Euclidean embedding to demonstrate the suitability of the former on network distance prediction. We further studied the incorporation of a robust loss function and of non-negativity constraints. Extensive experiments on various publicly-available datasets of network delays show not only the scalability and the accuracy of our approach, but also its usability in real Internet applications. [less ▲]

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See detailDMFSGD: A Decentralized Matrix Factorization Algorithm for Network Distance Prediction
Liao, Yongjun ULg; Du, Wei; Geurts, Pierre ULg et al

Report (2012)

The knowledge of end-to-end network distances is essential to many Internet applications. As active probing of all pairwise distances is infeasible in large-scale networks, a natural idea is to measure a ... [more ▼]

The knowledge of end-to-end network distances is essential to many Internet applications. As active probing of all pairwise distances is infeasible in large-scale networks, a natural idea is to measure a few pairs and to predict the other ones without actually measuring them. This paper formulates the distance prediction problem as matrix completion where unknown entries of an incomplete matrix of pairwise distances are to be predicted. The problem is solvable because strong correlations among network distances exist and cause the constructed distance matrix to be low rank. The new formulation circumvents the well-known drawbacks of existing approaches based on Euclidean embedding. A new algorithm, so-called Decentralized Matrix Factorization by Stochastic Gradient Descent (DMFSGD), is proposed to solve the network distance prediction problem. By letting network nodes exchange messages with each other, the algorithm is fully decentralized and only requires each node to collect and to process local measurements, with neither explicit matrix constructions nor special nodes such as landmarks and central servers. In addition, we compared comprehensively matrix factorization and Euclidean embedding to demonstrate the suitability of the former on network distance prediction. We further studied the incorporation of a robust loss function and of non-negativity constraints. Extensive experiments on various publicly-available datasets of network delays show not only the scalability and the accuracy of our approach but also its usability in real Internet applications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (3 ULg)
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See detailThe DmpA aminopeptidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991 is the prototype of a new terminal nucleophile hydrolase family.
Fanuel, L; Goffin, Colette ULg; Cheggour, A et al

in Biochemical Journal (1999), 341(Pt 1), 147-55

The DmpA (d-aminopeptidase A) protein produced by Ochrobactrum anthropi hydrolyses p-nitroanilide derivatives of glycine and d-alanine more efficiently than that of l-alanine. When regular peptides are ... [more ▼]

The DmpA (d-aminopeptidase A) protein produced by Ochrobactrum anthropi hydrolyses p-nitroanilide derivatives of glycine and d-alanine more efficiently than that of l-alanine. When regular peptides are utilized as substrates, the enzyme behaves as an aminopeptidase with a preference for N-terminal residues in an l configuration, thus exemplifying an interesting case of stereospecificity reversal. The best-hydrolysed substrate is l-Ala-Gly-Gly, but tetra- and penta-peptides are also efficiently hydrolysed. The gene encodes a 375-residue precursor, but the active enzyme contains two polypeptides corresponding to residues 2-249 (alpha-subunit) and 250-375 (beta-subunit) of the precursor. Residues 249 and 250 are a Gly and a Ser respectively, and various substitutions performed by site-directed mutagenesis result in the production of an uncleaved and inactive protein. The N-terminal Ser residue of the beta-subunit is followed by a hydrophobic peptide, which is predicted to form a beta-strand structure. All these properties strongly suggest that DmpA is an N-terminal amidohydrolase. An exploration of the databases highlights the presence of a number of open reading frames encoding related proteins in various bacterial genomes. Thus DmpA is very probably the prototype of an original family of N-terminal hydrolases. [less ▲]

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See detailDMPO for quantitative measurements of singlet oxygen production?
Damoiseau, X.; Heyne, B.; Hoebeke, Maryse ULg

Conference (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (4 ULg)
See detailA DMS platform for monitoring and analysing large distribution networks
Rousseaux, Patricia ULg; Quoilin, Isabelle; Van Cutsem, Thierry ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Electricity Distribution (1999)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
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See detailThe DNA 3'-phosphatase and 5'-hydroxyl kinase of rat liver chromatin
Habraken, Yvette ULg; Verly, Walter

in FEBS Letters (1983), 160(1,2), 46-50

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (5 ULg)
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See detailDNA and RNA distribution in the nucleus of trypanosomatids: a cytochemical and immunocytochemical study
Motta, M C M; De Souza, W; Thiry, Marc ULg

in Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (1999), 94

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See detailDNA bending by the silencer protein NeP1 is modulated by TR and RXR.
Arnold, R.; Burcin, M.; Kaiser, Bruno ULg et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (1996), 24(14), 2640-7

NeP1 binds to the F1 silencer element of the chicken lysozyme gene and, in the presence of TR, v-ERBA or RAR, synergistically represses transcriptional activity. This repression involves a silencing ... [more ▼]

NeP1 binds to the F1 silencer element of the chicken lysozyme gene and, in the presence of TR, v-ERBA or RAR, synergistically represses transcriptional activity. This repression involves a silencing mechanism acting independently of the relative promoter position. Here we show that NeP1 alone can induce a significant directed bend on DNA. The chicken homologue of human NeP1, CTCF, shows identical binding and bending properties. In contrast, the isolated DNA binding domain of CTCF efficiently binds DNA, but fails to confer bending. Similarly, the TR-RXR hetero- or homodimer, binding adjacent to NeP1 at the F2 sequence, do not show significant DNA bending. The binding of the T3 ligand to TR changes neither the magnitude nor the direction of the NeP1 induced bend. However, when all factors are bound simultaneously as a quaternary complex, the TR-RXR heterodimer changes the location of the bend center, the flexure angle and the bending direction. [less ▲]

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See detailDNA binding activity of transcription factors in bronchial cells of horses with recurrent airway obstruction.
Couetil, Laurent L; Art, Tatiana ULg; De Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2006), 113(1-2), 11-20

Horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) present many similarities with human asthmatics including airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, reversible obstruction, and increased NF-kappaB ... [more ▼]

Horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) present many similarities with human asthmatics including airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, reversible obstruction, and increased NF-kappaB expression. Studies in experimental asthma models have shown that transcriptions factors such as activator protein-1 (AP-1), GATA-3, cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) may also play an important role in airway inflammation. The purpose of this study was to measure DNA binding activity of these transcription factors in the airways of horses with RAO and to compare it to pulmonary function and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cytology. Seven horses with RAO and six control animals were studied during a moldy hay challenge and after 2 months at pasture. Pulmonary function, BALF cytology and transcription factors' activities in bronchial brushings were measured during hay and pasture exposures. During moldy hay challenge, RAO-affected horses developed severe airway obstruction and inflammation and a significantly higher airway AP-1 binding activity than in controls. After 2 months on pasture, pulmonary function and airway AP-1 binding activity were not different between RAO and control horses. The DNA binding activity of CREB in airways of RAO-affected horses increased significantly after 2 months at pasture and became higher than in controls. A significant positive correlation was detected between AP-1 binding activity and indicators of airway obstruction and inflammation. Airway GATA-3, CEBP and CREB binding activities were negatively correlated with indices of airway obstruction. However, contrarily to CREB binding activity, GATA-3 and CEBP binding activities were not different between RAO and control horses and were unaffected by changes in environment. These data support the view that AP-1 and CREB play a role in modulating airway inflammation in horses with RAO [less ▲]

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See detailDNA Computing Circuits Using Libraries of DNAzyme Subunits
Elbaz, J.; Lioubashevskia, O.; Remacle, Françoise ULg et al

in Nature Nanotechnology (2010), 5

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (0 ULg)
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See detailDNA fingerprinting in domestic animals using four different minisatellite probes.
Georges, Michel ULg; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie ULg; Castelli, M. et al

in CytoGenetics & Cell Genetics (1988), 47(3), 127-31

Four probes known to allow DNA fingerprinting in the human (M13, Jeffreys' core sequence, the human alpha globin hypervariable region [HVR], and a mouse probe related to the Drosophila Per gene) were ... [more ▼]

Four probes known to allow DNA fingerprinting in the human (M13, Jeffreys' core sequence, the human alpha globin hypervariable region [HVR], and a mouse probe related to the Drosophila Per gene) were checked for their ability to reveal "genetic bar codes" in cattle, horses, pigs, dogs, chickens, and a European cyprinid fish, the barbel (Barbus barbus L.). Individual-specific patterns were obtained in cattle using M13, Jeffreys' core sequence, and the alpha globin HVR, in horses, dogs, and pigs using M13, Jeffreys' core sequence, and the Per probe, and in chicken and fish using the four different probes. Although we observed a considerable heterogeneity in the extent of interindividual variation, depending on the particular probe-species combination, the fingerprints are polymorphic enough to be used efficiently in animal identification, paternity testing, and as a source of genetic markers for linkage analysis. These markers should substantially accelerate the mapping of genes affecting economically important traits. [less ▲]

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See detailDNA Fingerprinting in Man Using a Mouse Probe Related to Part of the Drosophila 'Per' Gene
Georges, Michel ULg; Cochaux, P.; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie ULg et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (1987), 15(17), 7193

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See detailDNA fingerprinting using Diversilab system for genotyping characterization of Microsporum audouinii and Trichophyton violaceum
SACHELI, Rosalie ULg; DIMO, Lauryl; GRAIDE, Hélène ULg et al

in Mycoses (2013, October 01), 56(Supplement S3), 99

Objectives: To investigate the epidemiological determinants responsible for the high number of anthropophilic dermatophytes received by the National Reference Center for Mycosis of Liege (NRCL) during the ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To investigate the epidemiological determinants responsible for the high number of anthropophilic dermatophytes received by the National Reference Center for Mycosis of Liege (NRCL) during the year 2012. To perform a genotypic characterization by the Diversilab® system focusing on the two main isolated species, Microsporum audouinii and Trichophyton violaceum. To present a preliminary study preceding the national survey launched in 2013. Methods: A total of 51 strains of M. audouinii (50 clinical + 1 reference (ref.) strains) and 15 strains of T. violaceum (14 clinical + 1 ref. strain) originating from different locations through Belgium were included in the study. The fungal strains were first cultivated on Malt agar, then sub-cultured in Sabouraud liquid medium (Fluka). The grown mycelium was processed for DNA extraction following recommendations of the manufacturer (Ultra Clean® DNA Microbial isolation kit, MoBio laboratories). Genotypic analysis was performed using the DiversiLab® system (BioMérieux) for DNA fingerprinting and analysis. Results: Regarding M. audouinii, four different genotypic groups of strains were separated. Group 1 includes 11 strains and is only found in the Liège surroundings. Group 2 includes only one strain with little differences compared to group 1 and collected from the Liège area. These two groups may be related to each other. Group 3 contains 36 strains and the reference strain. This genotype is distributed in different Belgium locations. The last group, group 4, contains only 3 isolates sharing low similarities in comparison with the 3 other groups. Concerning T. violaceum, 6 different genotypic groups with a mixed geographical distribution were determined. Group 1 includes 8 clinical isolates and the ref. strain. The other five isolates are all different and seem not to be related to each other. Conclusion: The automated typing DiversiLab® system proved to be an easy and efficient method to investigate the molecular epidemiology of dermatophytes infections. Preliminary results of the study show that, through Belgium, several groups of isolates co-exist for M. audouinii and T. violaceum providing evidence of genetic heterogeneity. This variation can be related to acquired mutations due to environmental adaptation. Further investigations are necessary to better understand the impact of this genotypic variation. [less ▲]

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