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See detailDoes one observe the honeybee colony collapse disorder in Europe ?
Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2007)

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See detailDoes ovarian surgery for endometriomas impair the ovarian response to gonadotropin?
Donnez, Jacques; Wyns, Christine; NISOLLE, Michelle ULg

in Fertility and Sterility (2001), 76(4), 662-5

Objective: To evaluate the ovarian response to stimulation conducted for IVF treatment in women who have undergone conservative surgery for endometriomas. Design: Retrospective study with prospective ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the ovarian response to stimulation conducted for IVF treatment in women who have undergone conservative surgery for endometriomas. Design: Retrospective study with prospective selection of participants and controls. Setting: University infertility clinic. Patient(s): A series of 374 women who underwent in vitro fertilization (IVF). The study group consisted of 85 patients with ovarian endometriomas who had undergone laparoscopic surgery in an attempt to become pregnant, but had failed within a year of surgery. The control group consisted of 289 patients with tubal factor infertility. Intervention(s): IVF-embryo transfer procedures. Main Outcome Measure(s): Stimulation parameters, fertilization, implantation, and pregnancy rates were analyzed in both groups. Result(s): There was no significant difference between the two groups in stimulation parameters or IVF outcome. Conclusion(s): A total of 820 cycles were analyzed. A similar IVF-ET outcome was observed in patients with endometriosis after ablation of endometriomas compared to women with tubal factors. In conclusion, endometrioma surgery by internal wall vaporization does not impair IVF outcome. The clinical pregnancy rate was respectively 37.4% and 34.6% in the endometriosis group and the control group. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes Personality Modulate Skin Conductance Responses to Emotional Stimuli?
Mardaga, S.; Hansenne, Michel ULg

in Journal of Individual Differences (2010), 31(3), 124-129

Several studies showed that personality modulates emotional responsiveness, though most of them used subjective ratings as the measure of emotion. The present study extends personality-emotion ... [more ▼]

Several studies showed that personality modulates emotional responsiveness, though most of them used subjective ratings as the measure of emotion. The present study extends personality-emotion relationship findings to psychophysiological methods, more precisely to skin conductance responses (SCRs). SCRs were recorded in 54 normal subjects following the presentation of neutral and emotional pictures. Results showed that half-recovery time was modulated by harm avoidance (HA) as a function of emotional valence: Low-HA subjects showed longer half-recovery time following the presentation of pleasant pictures relative to neutral ones, whereas high-HA subjects showed no extended half-recovery time. These results support the hypothesis that personality modulates some aspects of somatic emotional reactivity, and together with previous results, they suggest that this phenomenon is highly dependent upon the characteristics of the emotional material. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes pet ownership in infancy lead to asthma or allergy at school age? Pooled analysis of individual participant data from 11 European birth cohorts.
Lødrup Carlsen, Karin; Roll, Stephanie; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon et al

in PLoS ONE (2012)

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See detailDoes placebo based validation standards mimic well real batch products behaviour? A case study
Bouabidi, Abderrahim ULg; Talbi, M.; Bouklouze, A. et al

Poster (2010, September)

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See detailDoes plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 drive lymphangiogenesis?
Bruyere, Francoise; Melen-Lamalle, Laurence; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2010), 5(3), 9653

The purpose of this study is to explore the function of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) during pathological lymphangiogenesis. PAI-1, the main physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activators ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study is to explore the function of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) during pathological lymphangiogenesis. PAI-1, the main physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activators is involved in pathological angiogenesis at least by controlling extracellular proteolysis and by regulating endothelial cell survival and migration. Protease system's role in lymphangiogenesis is unknown yet. Thus, based on its important pro-angiogenic effect, we hypothesized that PAI-1 may regulate lymphangiogenesis associated at least with metastatic dissemination of cancer cells. To address this issue, we studied the impact of PAI-1 deficiency in various murine models of tumoral lymphangiogenesis. Wild-type PAI-1 proficient mice were used as controls. We provide for the first time evidence that PAI-1 is dispensable for tumoral lymphangiogenesis associated with breast cancers either induced by mammary carcinoma cell injection or spontaneously appearing in transgenic mice expressing the polyomavirus middle T antigen (PymT) under the control of a mouse mammary tumor virus long-terminal repeat promoter (MMTV-LTR). We also investigated inflammation-related lymphatic vessel recruitment by using two inflammatory models. PAI-1 deficiency did neither affect the development of lymphangioma nor burn-induced corneal lymphangiogenesis. These novel data suggest that vascular remodelling associated with lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis involve different molecular determinants. PAI-1 does not appear as a potential therapeutic target to counteract pathological lymphangiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes preoperative somatostatin analog treatment improve surgical cure rates in acromegaly? A new look at an old question.
Beckers, Albert ULg

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2008), 93(8), 2975-2977

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See detailDoes probabilistic modelling of linkage disequilibrium evolution improve the accuracy of QTL location in animal pedigree?
Cierco-Ayrolles, C.; Dejean, S.; Legarra, A. et al

in Genetics, Selection, Evolution (2010), 42

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See detailDoes processing speed protect from age-related decline in cognitive control ?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Poster (2012, October 27)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential influence of speed of processing abilities on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. The main results revealed significant effects of age on sensitivity to interference. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, when the groups are matched according to their processing speed (assessed by the Code task of the WAIS III, with both younger and older adults having a score comprised between 60 and 93), the effect of age on sensitivity to interference disappeared. In other words, when younger and older adults had similar speed of processing abilities, no age-related proactive control decline was observed. In conclusion, beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that speed of processing, a measure considered as reflecting the integrity of cognitive functioning during aging (Salthouse, 1996), influences the efficiency of proactive control in that population. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes processing speed protect from age-related decline in cognitive control?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Poster (2012, August 30)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. This study investigated the potential influence of speed of processing abilities on the ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. This study investigated the potential influence of speed of processing abilities on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. Main results revealed significant effects of age on interference sensitivity. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, when the groups are matched according to their processing speed (assessed by the Code task of the WAIS III, with both younger and older adults having a score comprised between 60 and 93), the effect of age on sensitivity to interference disappeared. In other words, when younger and older adults had similar speed of processing abilities, no age-related proactive control decline was observed. In conclusion, beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that speed of processing, a measure considered as reflecting the integrity of cognitive functioning during aging, influences the efficiency of proactive control in that population. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes processing speed protect from age-related decline in cognitive control?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012, October 27)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential influence of speed of processing abilities on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. The main results revealed significant effects of age on sensitivity to interference. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, when the groups are matched according to their processing speed (assessed by the Code task of the WAIS III, with both younger and older adults having a score comprised between 60 and 93), the effect of age on sensitivity to interference disappeared. In other words, when younger and older adults had similar speed of processing abilities, no age-related proactive control decline was observed. In conclusion, beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that speed of processing, a measure considered as reflecting the integrity of cognitive functioning during aging (Salthouse, 1996), influences the efficiency of proactive control in that population. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes proliferation status predict radiation response in human tumors?
Coucke, Philippe ULg

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1996), 40(Supp 1), 55

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See detailDoes propofol alter membrane fluidity at clinically relevant concentrations? An ESR spin label study
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Seret, Alain ULg; Hans, Pol ULg et al

in Biophysical Chemistry (2007), 129(1), 82-91

General anesthetics have been shown to perturb the membrane properties of excitable tissues. Due to their lipid solubility, anesthetics dissolve in every membrane, penetrate into organelles and interact ... [more ▼]

General anesthetics have been shown to perturb the membrane properties of excitable tissues. Due to their lipid solubility, anesthetics dissolve in every membrane, penetrate into organelles and interact with numerous cellular structures in multiple ways. Several studies indicate that anesthetics alter membrane fluidity and decrease the phase-transition temperature. However, the required concentrations to induce such effects on the properties of membrane lipids are by far higher than clinically relevant concentrations. In the present study, the fluidizing effect of the anesthetic agent propofol (2,6-diisopropyl phenol: PPF), a general anesthetic extensively used in clinical practice, has been investigated on liposome dimyristoyi-L-alpha phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cell (erythrocyte, Neuro-2a) membranes using electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) of nitroxide labeled fatty acid probes (5-, 16-doxyl stearic acid). A clear effect of PPF at concentrations higher than the clinically relevant ones was quantified both in liposome and cell membranes, while no evident fluidity effect was measured at the clinical PPF doses. However, absorption spectroscopy of merocyanine 540 (MC540) clearly indicates a PPF fluidizing capacity in liposome membrane even at these clinical concentrations. PPF may locally influence the structure and dynamics of membrane domains, through the formation of small-scale lipid domains, which would explain the lack of ESR information at low PPF concentrations. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes psychological characteristic influence physicians' communication styles? Impact of physicians' locus of control on interviews with a cancer patient and a relative
Libert, Yves; Merckaert, Isabelle; Reynaert, Christine et al

in Supportive Care in Cancer (2006), 14(3), 230-242

Context: Physicians' psychological characteristics may influence their communication styles and may thus interfere with patient-centred communication. Objective: Our aim was to test the hypothesis that ... [more ▼]

Context: Physicians' psychological characteristics may influence their communication styles and may thus interfere with patient-centred communication. Objective: Our aim was to test the hypothesis that, in interviews with a cancer patient and a relative, physicians with an "external" locus of control (LOC; who believe that life outcomes are controlled by external forces such as luck, fate or others) have a communication style different from that of physicians with an "internal" LOC (who believe that life outcomes are controlled by their own characteristics or actions). Design, setting, participants and intervention: Eighty-one voluntary physicians practising in the field of oncology were recorded while performing an actual and a simulated interview with a cancer patient and a relative. Main outcome measures: Physicians' communication skills were assessed using the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Physicians' LOC was assessed using the Rotter I-E scale. The communication skills of the upper and lower quartiles of physicians in respect of their scores on this scale were compared using Student's t test. Results: In actual interviews, physicians with an "external" LOC talked more to the relative (P=0.017) and used more utterances with an assessment function (P=0.010) than physicians with an "internal" LOC. In simulated interviews, physicians with an "external" LOC used less utterances that give premature information (P=0.031) and used more utterances with a supportive function, such as empathy and reassurance (P=0.029), than physicians with an "internal" LOC. Conclusion: These results provide evidence that physicians' LOC can influence their communication styles. Physicians' awareness of this influence constitutes a step towards a tailoring of their communication skills to every patient's and relative's concerns and needs and thus towards a patient-centred communication. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes pupil constriction under blue and green monochromatic light exposure change with age?
Daneault, V; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Hébert, M et al

Poster (2012, February)

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See detailDoes pupil constriction under blue and green monochromatic light exposure change with age?
Daneault*, Véronique; Vandewalle*, Gilles ULg; Hébert, Marc et al

in Journal of Biological Rhythms (2012), 27(3), 257-264

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See detailDoes radiation treatment delay affect survival in glioblastoma
Robe, Pierre ULg; Nguyen-Khac, Minh-Tuan ULg; Lenelle, Jacques ULg et al

in Surgical Neurology (2009), 72(5), 519

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See detailDoes radiation treatment delay affect survival in glioblastoma ?
Robe, Pierre ULg; Nguyen Khac, Minh-Tuan ULg; Lenelle, Jacques ULg et al

Conference (2009, March 21)

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See detailDoes radiotherapy have consequences on plasma concentration of toxic pollutants?
Charlier, Corinne ULg; Closon, Marie-Thérèse ULg; Plomteux, Guy ULg

in Bulletin of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology (2003), 70(1), 17-21

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)