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See detailCustomizing an adaptive case management software in a GMP production lab as a quality management system for clinical trial PET radiopharmaceuticals development and production
Aerts, Joël ULiege; Renard; Léonard, Marc ULiege et al

Poster (2013)

The Cyclotron Research Centre (CRC) of the University of Liège develops and produces innovative radiopharmaceuticals for research and clinical diagnostic applications in humans. We report our recent ... [more ▼]

The Cyclotron Research Centre (CRC) of the University of Liège develops and produces innovative radiopharmaceuticals for research and clinical diagnostic applications in humans. We report our recent experience in the implementation of an adaptive case management software as a tool of tractability and quality management in our GMP1 facility. [less ▲]

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See detailCustomizing mesoscale self-assembly with three-dimensional printing
Poty, Martin ULiege; Lumay, Geoffroy ULiege; Vandewalle, Nicolas ULiege

in New Journal of Physics (2014)

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See detailCustoms and Catch-All implementation: Catch-All Controls -Theory and Practice
Chatelus, Renaud ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

This paper presents the main issues of the enforcement of "catch all" close in export control regulations and specifically in relations to customs processes in the context of Mexico

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See detailCustoms perspective on Strategic Trade Control
Chatelus, Renaud ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

Le lecture is about the Customs perspective on Strategic Trade Control and in particular the ability to intercept illegal shipments of dual use items

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULiège)
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See detailCusum techniques in clinical chemistry quality control
Albert, Adelin ULiege

in Clinical research centre (1972)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (3 ULiège)
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See detailCutaneous adverse reactions following anti-infective vaccinations.
Nikkels, Arjen ULiege; Tassoudji, Nazli ULiege; Pierard, Gérald ULiege

in American Journal of Clinical Dermatology (2005), 6(2), 79-87

Although widely administered, anti-infective vaccinations are rarely responsible for cutaneous adverse effects. In this context, hepatitis B and bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccines are the most frequently ... [more ▼]

Although widely administered, anti-infective vaccinations are rarely responsible for cutaneous adverse effects. In this context, hepatitis B and bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccines are the most frequently incriminated products. Cutaneous adverse effects are less frequently encountered following administration of vaccines against varicella, diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis (primary and booster doses), measles, poliomyelitis, rubella, pneumococcus, tick-borne encephalitis, smallpox, Meningococcus and influenza. The adverse effects can occur at the site of or at a distance from the injection. The patho-mechanisms of local adverse cutaneous reactions include predominantly nonspecific lymphoid or granulomatous reactions. Allergic reactions to the vaccine strain, adjuvants, conservatives or other components are less frequently involved in local vaccine adverse effects. Systemic reactions are mainly mediated by immediate type or immune complex-related allergic reactions to toxoid-, ovalbumin-, gelatin- or pneumococcal-containing vaccines. Systemic reactions are sometimes related to a specific vaccine strain. Other cutaneous reactions may also occur through unknown patho-mechanisms. No vaccine type or strain is specifically associated with a particular type of cutaneous adverse effect. This article presents seven case reports of cutaneous adverse effects following anti-infective vaccination then reviews the relevant literature on this subject. [less ▲]

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See detailCutaneous and basophilic sensitivity to substance P and gastrin in non-atopic versus atopic subjects.
Louis, Renaud ULiege; Radermecker, Maurice ULiege

in Allergy (1991), 46(1), 30-4

We compared the cutaneous reaction to intradermal injection of substance P, gastrin and histamine in asymptomatic atopic subjects with a history of hay fever and/or asthma versus non-atopic healthy ... [more ▼]

We compared the cutaneous reaction to intradermal injection of substance P, gastrin and histamine in asymptomatic atopic subjects with a history of hay fever and/or asthma versus non-atopic healthy volunteers. We also studied in these two groups the basophilic histamine release induced by substance P and gastrin with that obtained with anti-human IgE and Con A. Intradermal injection of substance P (3-300 pM) and gastrin (3-30 pM) caused a wheal and flare reaction which was comparable in both groups of subjects. Substance P 10(-4)M caused a mean basophilic histamine release of about 15% in atopic and non-atopic subjects. Gastrin was not effective in this model. Anti-IgE and Con A-induced histamine release was significantly higher in atopic than in non-atopic volunteers. [less ▲]

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See detailCutaneous and preputial candidiasis in a guinea pig
Mignon, Bernard ULiege; Losson, Bertrand ULiege

Conference (2001)

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See detailCutaneous epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma in the cat: a review of the literature and five new cases.
Fontaine, Jacques ULiege; Heimann, Marianne; Day, Michael J

in Veterinary Dermatology (2011), Volume 22(5), 454461

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See detailCutaneous infection by Alternaria infectoria in a renal transplant patient.
Segner, S.; JOURET, François ULiege; Durant, J.-F. et al

in Transplant Infectious Disease : An Official Journal of the Transplantation Society (2009), 11(4), 330-2

Skin lesions are common in renal transplant recipients (RTR) and the clinical distinction of malignancy versus infection may be difficult in this patient population, with the need for further histological ... [more ▼]

Skin lesions are common in renal transplant recipients (RTR) and the clinical distinction of malignancy versus infection may be difficult in this patient population, with the need for further histological and biological investigations. We report here on a 73-year-old male RTR who presented with Alternaria infectoria phaeohyphomycosis of 1 year's duration. Mycological cultures were negative, and the diagnosis was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and direct sequencing. The extension of the lesion under itraconazole treatment required its surgical excision. Alternaria are ubiquitous plant-inhabiting saprobes, which are increasingly associated with opportunistic phaeohyphomycosis in immunocompromised individuals. [less ▲]

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See detailCutaneous involvement in multiple myeloma: a multi-institutional retrospective study of 53 patients
Jurczyszyn, A.; Olszewska-Szopa, M.; Hungria, V. et al

in Leukemia & Lymphoma (2016), 57(9 2071-6), 2071-6

Skin infiltration in multiple myeloma (skin MM) is a rare clinical problem. Only a few cases of skin involvement have been reported, primarily in single case reports. We analyzed and present the clinical ... [more ▼]

Skin infiltration in multiple myeloma (skin MM) is a rare clinical problem. Only a few cases of skin involvement have been reported, primarily in single case reports. We analyzed and present the clinical outcomes, immunohistochemistry and cytogenetic features, and relevant laboratory data on 53 biopsy-proven skin MM cases. The median time from MM diagnosis to skin involvement was 2 years. There appears to be an overrepresentation of immunoglobulin class A (IgA) and light chain disease in skin MM. We found no correlation between CD56 negative MM and skin infiltration. We found that skin MM patients presented in all MM stages (i.e. ISS stages I to III), and there was no preferential cytogenetic abnormality. Patients with skin MM carry a very poor prognosis with a median overall survival (OS) of 8.5 months as time from skin involvement. Moreover, patients with IgA disease and plasmablastic morphology appear to have a worse OS. [less ▲]

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See detailCutaneous Melanocytomas: Variants and Caveats
Pierard, Gérald ULiege; Franchimont, Claudine ULiege

in Austin Journal of Cancer and Clinical Research (2015), 2(3), 1035

There is a regular improvement in the early clinical disclosure of various atypical melanocytic neoplasms (AMN). The histopathological examination of AMN remains mandatory for establishing their diagnosis ... [more ▼]

There is a regular improvement in the early clinical disclosure of various atypical melanocytic neoplasms (AMN). The histopathological examination of AMN remains mandatory for establishing their diagnosis and proper management. Panels of experts in AMN diagnosis report only moderate agreement in a diversity of puzzling cases. Some AMN have been differently designated in the literature including atypical Spitz tumor, metastasizing Spitz tumor, borderline and intermediate melanocytic tumor, malignant Spitz nevus and pigmented epithelioid melanocytoma or animal-type melanoma. Some acronyms have been further offered such as MELTUMP (after “melanocytic tumor of uncertain malignant potential”) and STUMP (after “Spitzoid melanocytic tumor of uncertain malignant potential”). In this review, such AMN at the exclusion of cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) variants, are grouped under the tentative broad heading cutaneous melanocytoma. These lesions typically follow an indolent course, although they exhibit an atypical and sometimes worrisome patterns or cytologic aspects. Rare cases of cutaneous melanocytomas progress to locoregional clusters of lesions (agminate lesions), and even to regional lymph nodes. At times, the distinction between a cutaneous melanocytoma and MM remains problematic and even proves to be merely impossible. However, multipronged immunohistochemistry helps assessing the malignancy risk. [less ▲]

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See detailCutaneous mucormycosis.
Flagothier, Caroline ULiege; Arrese Estrada, Jorge ULiege; Quatresooz, Pascale ULiege et al

in Journal de Mycologie Médicale (2006), 16

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See detailCutaneous myospherulosis and membranous lipodystrophy: extensive presentation in a patient with severe steroid-induced dermal atrophy.
Flagothier, Caroline ULiege; Pierard, Gérald ULiege; Quatresooz, Pascale ULiege

in Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & Venereology (2006), 20(4), 457-60

Myospherulosis is a rare disorder that may develop in various organs including the skin. It is characterized by a typical histological presentation resulting from the interaction between erythrocytes and ... [more ▼]

Myospherulosis is a rare disorder that may develop in various organs including the skin. It is characterized by a typical histological presentation resulting from the interaction between erythrocytes and lipids. We present a case of cutaneous myospherulosis associated with membranous lipodystrophy. The lesions were supervening on severe steroid-induced skin atrophy upon which ointments had been applied. [less ▲]

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See detailCutaneous papules in a patient with AIDS.
Quatresooz, Pascale ULiege; Franchimont, Claudine ULiege; Paquet, Philippe ULiege et al

in Dermatology Reports (2010), 2(e2), 4-5

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See detailCutaneous psammomatous melanotic schwannoma: non-recurrence with surgical excision.
Claessens, Nadine; Heymans, Olivier; Arrese Estrada, Jorge ULiege et al

in American Journal of Clinical Dermatology (2003), 4(11), 799-802

BACKGROUND: Melanotic schwannoma is a pigmented nerve tumor that may be located in the skin and express local aggressivity. This tumor may occur singly. It may also be part of the Carney complex which ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Melanotic schwannoma is a pigmented nerve tumor that may be located in the skin and express local aggressivity. This tumor may occur singly. It may also be part of the Carney complex which consists of various, but specific, tumors. OBJECTIVE: We report two cases of subcutaneous melanotic schwannoma localized on the trunk in two men aged 37 and 45 years. METHODS: Conventional histology and immunohistochemistry were performed. RESULTS: One melanotic schwannoma was associated with a cutaneous atypical myxoma and multiple melanocytic lesions, all being part of the Carney complex. The other case had no associated signs. In both cases, the melanotic schwannoma was completely excised and did not recur. CONCLUSION: Melanotic schwannoma is rare and curable by surgery. It must not be confused with malignant melanoma and other pigmented neoplasms. The Carney complex should be carefully ruled out. [less ▲]

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See detailCutaneous side effects of antiosteoporosis treatments
Musette, P.; Kaufman, J.-M.; Rizzoli, R. et al

in Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease (2011), 3(1), 31-41

Cutaneous adverse reactions are reported for many therapeutic agents and, in general, are observed in between 0% and 8% of treated patients depending on the drug. Antiosteoporotic agents are considered to ... [more ▼]

Cutaneous adverse reactions are reported for many therapeutic agents and, in general, are observed in between 0% and 8% of treated patients depending on the drug. Antiosteoporotic agents are considered to be safe in terms of cutaneous effects, however there have been a number of case reports of cutaneous adverse reactions which warrant consideration. This was the subject of a working group meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis in April 2009, which focused on the impact of cutaneous adverse reactions and drug-induced hypersensitivity in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This position paper was drafted following these discussions and includes a flowchart for their recognition. Cutaneous adverse reactions observed with antiosteoporotic agents were reviewed and included information from case reports, regulatory documents and pharmacovigilance. These reactions ranged from benign effects including exanthematous or maculopapular eruption (drug rash), photosensitivity and urticaria, to the severe and potentially life-threatening reactions of angioedema, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. A review of the available evidence demonstrates that cutaneous adverse reactions occur with all commonly used antiosteoporotic treatments. Notably, there are reports of Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis for bisphosphonates, and of DRESS and toxic epidermal necrolysis for strontium ranelate. These severe reactions remain very rare (<1 in 10,000 cases). In general, with proper management and early recognition, including immediate and permanent withdrawal of the culprit agent, accompanied by hospitalization, rehydration and systemic corticosteroids if necessary, the prognosis is positive. © The Author(s), 2011. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULiège)