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See detailDermatitis in a horse associated with the poultry mite (Dermanyssus gallinae)
Mignon, Bernard ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg

in Veterinary Dermatology (2008), 19(1), 38-43

This is the first documented case report of dermatitis associated with the poultry mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) in a horse. It occurred in a 16-year-old horse that was in contact with domestic hens ... [more ▼]

This is the first documented case report of dermatitis associated with the poultry mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) in a horse. It occurred in a 16-year-old horse that was in contact with domestic hens. Clinical signs consisted of severe pruritus, with self-induced hair loss mainly on the head. Despite the multiple skin scrapings performed during both day- and nighttime, mites were only isolated from the in-contact poultry and from the horse's environment, and not the horse. The animal was treated using a 2% permethrin solution, sprayed on the entire body once a week for 4 weeks, and by decontamination of the horse's immediate environment. Although eradication of the mites and elimination of further contact between the horse and the poultry were not achievable, recurrence of dermatitis was prevented by regular applications of permethrin on the horse and biannual decontamination of the horse's stable. [less ▲]

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See detail"Dermato-couture": points de suture utiles en chirurgie dermatologique
Jacquemin, Gael; Richert, Bertrand ULg; de LA BRASSINNE, Michel ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2003), 58(2), 88-94

Dermatologists performing skin surgery mostly use the square knot. Other underused or even forgotten suturing techniques may still be helpful in some instances. We shall emphasize some simple techniques ... [more ▼]

Dermatologists performing skin surgery mostly use the square knot. Other underused or even forgotten suturing techniques may still be helpful in some instances. We shall emphasize some simple techniques such as the horizontal mattress suture, the “cross stitch”, the “corner stitch” (half buried mattress suture), the buried dermal suture, the buried vertical mattress suture, the continuous mattress suture and the running intradermal suture. In given circumstances, all of them may improve suturing and promote healing. Technical aspects, advantages and disadvantages of each type of suture will be briefly described. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatologic Manifestations of the LEOPARD Syndrome
CAO, Sandrine ULg; NIKKELS, Arjen ULg

in The Open Dermatology Journal (2013), 7

The LEOPARD syndrome is an exceptional autosomal dominant genetic disease with a missence mutation of the PTPN11 gene in more than 90% of the cases. The principal clinical manifestations include extensive ... [more ▼]

The LEOPARD syndrome is an exceptional autosomal dominant genetic disease with a missence mutation of the PTPN11 gene in more than 90% of the cases. The principal clinical manifestations include extensive lentiginosis, heart conduction abnormalities, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonary stenosis, genital anomalies, mental retardation, growth retardation and deafness. A woman with a LEOPARD syndrome illustrates the progressive development of melanocytic nevi. In fact, the majority of lentigines are actually melanocytic nevi. Seqential digital demroscopy evidences progressive growth of some melanocytic lesions. The ever-increasing number of melanocytic nevi in the LEOPARD syndrome is a risk factor for melanoma and full body photography and dermoscopy are recommended for follow-up. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatological manifestations of varicella
EL HAYDERI, Lara ULg; NIKKELS, Arjen ULg

in Berhardt, Leon V. (Ed.) Advances in Medicine and Biology (2013)

The Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for chickenpox and herpes zoster (HZ). VZV displays neuro- and epidermotropism, although other cells lines may be infected. A permissive type of VZV ... [more ▼]

The Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for chickenpox and herpes zoster (HZ). VZV displays neuro- and epidermotropism, although other cells lines may be infected. A permissive type of VZV infection in the epidermal and/or infundibular keratinocytes forms the majority of the skin lesions. This infections leads to intra-epidermal blistering, clinically characterized by vesicular lesions. During varicella, the haematogenous dissemination of VZV virions infects the dermal endothelial cells, which in their turn infect dermal dendrocytes who transport he virions to the keratinocytes of the basal layer. During HZ, the VZV virions arrive in the keratinocytes after release by the free nerve endings in close contact with the basal keratinocytes. The skin-associated immune system (SALT) furthermore determines the outcome of the virus/host cell relation. The spectrum of the VZV-related skin infections is presented with their pathogenic mechanisms, including lichenoid HZ, granulomatous HZ, verrucous HZ and follicular HZ. It is important to be aware of these manifestations of the VZV, in particular as VZV may present serious morbidity int eh immunocompromised patient. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatologie et Rhumatologie.
Quatresooz, Pascale ULg

Scientific conference (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
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See detailLes dermatomycoses de l'estran.
CAUCANAS, Marie ULg; FRANCHIMONT, Claudine ULg; PIERARD, Gérald ULg

in Dermatologie Actualité (2011), 127

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See detailDermatophylose équine: revue à partir d'un cas clinique
Vandenput, Sandrina ULg; Manteca, C.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1996), 140(2), 125-129

From a clinical case of equine dermatophilosis, a short review of literature is proposed. The aetiology, causal factors, symptoms and lesions are brievely reviewed. Therapeutics and prophylaxis are ... [more ▼]

From a clinical case of equine dermatophilosis, a short review of literature is proposed. The aetiology, causal factors, symptoms and lesions are brievely reviewed. Therapeutics and prophylaxis are outlined. [less ▲]

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See detailThe dermatophyte species Arthroderma benhamiae: intraspecies variability and mating behaviour
Symoens, F; Jousson, O; Packeu, A et al

in Journal of Medical Microbiology (2013), 62

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See detailDermatophytes and Dermatophytoses
Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Mignon, Bernard ULg

in Mycopathologia (2008), 166(5-6), 235-424

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See detailDermatophytes as Saprophytes and Pathogens
Monod, M; Mignon, Bernard ULg; Staib, P

in Sullivan, DJ; Moran, GP (Eds.) Human Pathogenic Fungi: Molecular Biology and Pathogenic Mechanisms (2014)

Dermatophytes infect the stratum corneum, nails and hair and are the most common agents of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. At present the genome of seven species has been sequenced. Between 22 ... [more ▼]

Dermatophytes infect the stratum corneum, nails and hair and are the most common agents of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. At present the genome of seven species has been sequenced. Between 22.5 and 24 Mb, the dermatophyte genomes are smaller in size than those of Coccidioides spp., Histoplasma spp. and Aspergillus spp. They are enriched for particular families of genes encoding secreted proteases, fungal specific kinases and proteins containing the LysM domain that is known to bind chitin. Different tools were recently developed to improve genetic analyses of dermatophytes, including efficient systems for targeted gene inactivation, gene silencing and broad transcriptional profiling techniques. Unexpectedly, gene expression profiles in the skin and hair of infected guinea pigs were found to be very different from those during in vitro growth using hard keratin as a substrate. Instead of the major in vitro expressed protease genes, others were found to only be activated in the skin of infected animals. In other words, the expression of putative virulence genes in dermatophytoses is more complex than previously assumed and likely depends on the site and type of infection. Further broad transcriptional profiling approaches during infections will give new insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of dermatophytes. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatophytes transmis par les animaux domestiques
Monod, M; Fratti, B; Mignon, Bernard ULg et al

in Revue Médicale Suisse (2014), 10

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See detailDermatophyties
Mignon, Bernard ULg

in Guaguère E., Prélaud P. (Ed.) Guide pratique de dermatologie canine (2006)

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See detailDermatophytoses - Mise au point
Mignon, Bernard ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2004)

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See detailDermatophytoses : actualités épidémiologiques et diagnostiques
Mignon, Bernard ULg

in Pratique Vet (2010), 45

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See detailDermatophytosis in cats : ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Frymus; Gruffydd-Jones, T.; Pennisi, M.G. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2013), 15

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See detailDermatophytosis, Trends in Epidemiolgy and Diagnostic Approach
HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre ULg; SACHELI, Rosalie ULg

in Current Fungal Infections report (2015), 9(3), 164-179

Dermatophytes are among the common fungal agents implicated in superficial skin infections. The anthropophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum is still the most frequent causative agent worldwide but the ... [more ▼]

Dermatophytes are among the common fungal agents implicated in superficial skin infections. The anthropophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum is still the most frequent causative agent worldwide but the prevalence of several species of dermatophytes varies through different areas around the world. This review summarizes the current status of dermatophytes infection in Europe, Africa, Asia and America and gives an overview of the molecular biology laboratory methods currently available for the diagnosis of dermatomycoses. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatophytosis: efficacy of commercial vaccines?
Mignon, Bernard ULg

in Proceedings of the 5th World Congress of Veterinary Dermatology (2004)

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See detailLa dermatoporose, un "vintage" de l'atrophodermie et de la "peau transparente".
FRANCHIMONT, Claudine ULg; Hermanns, J.F.; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69

Le vieillissement de la peau se marque à terme par une atrophodermie, parfois sévère. La corticothérapie, qu’elle soit systémique ou topique, exerce un effet atrophiant qui copie l’effet du grand âge. Cet ... [more ▼]

Le vieillissement de la peau se marque à terme par une atrophodermie, parfois sévère. La corticothérapie, qu’elle soit systémique ou topique, exerce un effet atrophiant qui copie l’effet du grand âge. Cet état d’atrophodermie a été décrit comme la «peau transparente» il y a une quarantaine d’années, et il a reçu plus récemment la nouvelle dénomination de dermatoporose. Il est connu de longue date que cet état entraîne des conséquences cliniques parfois majeures qui conduisent à des lésions diverses sous forme de purpura de Bateman, de cicatrices stellaires, et de plaies faisant suite à des traumatismes mineurs. [less ▲]

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See detailLes dermatoses les plus fréquentes chez le chiot
Mignon, Bernard ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2005)

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See detailLes dermatoses linéaires.
Thirion, L.; Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2006), 61(10), 719-23

Some typical distributions of skin lesions represent a helpful sign for the differential diagnosis in dermatology. Indeed, some dermatoses, affecting the skin, nails or mucosae, display an annular or ... [more ▼]

Some typical distributions of skin lesions represent a helpful sign for the differential diagnosis in dermatology. Indeed, some dermatoses, affecting the skin, nails or mucosae, display an annular or linear disposition. The linear pattern can be explained by several factors. The dermatosis can follow either a nerve traject, vascular or lymphatic vessels, or embryological lines. Exogenous factors, including traumatisms or automutilations, can also contribute to this particular distribution. In this review, the principal linear dermatoses are discussed together with their pathogenesis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (4 ULg)