Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of basement membrane antigens in glomeruli of mice with autoimmune glomerulonephritis.
Matsuo, S.; Brentjens, J. R.; Andres, G. et al

in American Journal of Pathology (1986), 122(1), 36-49

Glomerulonephritis was induced in mice by the repeated injection of human glomeruli or purified glomerular basement membrane. The glomerular basement membranes of nephritic animals were observed to ... [more ▼]

Glomerulonephritis was induced in mice by the repeated injection of human glomeruli or purified glomerular basement membrane. The glomerular basement membranes of nephritic animals were observed to develop subepithelial extensions, "spikes." Although normally Type IV collagen is found throughout the full thickness of basement membranes, the "spikes" reacted with antibodies to laminin but not with antibodies to Type IV collagen. It is proposed that in murine autoimmune glomerulonephritis, the visceral epithelial cells produce an excess of laminin. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDISTRIBUTION OF CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF STREPTOCOCCUS AGALACTIAE STRAINS FROM URUGUAY. MULTIPLEX PCR VERSUS CONVENTIONAL CAPSULAR SEROTYPING
Rodriguez Cuns, Grisel ULg; BOREUX, Raphaël ULg; ADAMS, Pauline et al

in XIX Lancefield International Symposium on Streptococci and Streptococcal Diseases, Program and Abstract book (2014, November 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULg)
See detailDistribution of Carabid beetles in a belgian peat bog : preliminary results
Dufrêne, Marc ULg

in Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica (1987), 22

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of Cd, Zn and Cu in liver and gills of the eel Anguilla anguilla with special reference to metallothioneins.
Lambot, Françoise ULg; Gerday, Charles ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. C : Comparative Pharmacology and Toxicology (1978), 61

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDistribution of cyanide content in the lima bean in relation with the intraspecific classification and the seed coat pigmentation.
Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg; Barthelemy, Jean-Paul ULg; Ndungo, V. et al

in Annual report of the Bean Improvement Cooperative (1990), 33

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of different collagen types and fibronectin in neurofibromatosis tumours.
Peltonen, J.; Aho, H.; Halme, T. et al

in Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica, et Immunologica Scandinavica. Section A-Pathology (1984), 92(5), 345-52

Collagen types I, III, IV and V and fibronectin were localized in neurofibromas from six patients with von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis (NF) using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and peroxidase ... [more ▼]

Collagen types I, III, IV and V and fibronectin were localized in neurofibromas from six patients with von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis (NF) using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP) techniques. Type I and III collagens were abundantly and rather evenly present in the tumours and formed a continuous network, but were absent from the capillary endothelial walls and were sparse in the perineurium of the occasional nerve fascicles. The type III/type I + type III collagen ratio in neurofibromas varied from 17.4% to 37.3% when estimated with cyanogen bromide peptide analysis. Fibronectin was detected in areas where type I and III collagens were present but was most intensively stained in the vascular walls and perineurium. Type IV collagen was detected at the dermo-epidermal junction of the skin overlying the tumours, in the endothelial cells of the capillaries, the perineurium and endoneurium. Furthermore, in the tumourous stroma there was plenty of type IV collagen appearing as a discontinuous patchy pattern suggesting abundant basement membrane material associated with cells forming the tumours. Type V collagen distribution was very similar to that of type IV collagen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of EFHC1 or myoclonin 1 in mouse neural structures
Leon, Christine ULg; de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Chanas, Grazyna et al

in Epilepsy Research (2010), 88

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of Estrogen Receptors in the Brain of the Japanese Quail: An Immunocytochemical Study
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Gahr, M.; Surlemont, C.

in Brain Research (1989), 501(2), 205-14

The distribution of estrogen receptors in the quail brain was investigated by immunocytochemistry using the monoclonal antibody H222SPy raised against estrogen receptors that had been isolated from a ... [more ▼]

The distribution of estrogen receptors in the quail brain was investigated by immunocytochemistry using the monoclonal antibody H222SPy raised against estrogen receptors that had been isolated from a human mammary tumor. Nuclei which contained cells labeled for estrogen receptor were identified in the telencephalon, diencephalon and mesencephalon. In particular, a high percentage of labeled cells was observed in the lateral septum, the nucleus accumbens, the preoptic medial nucleus, the supraoptic nuclei, the anterior medial hypothalamus, the paraventricular magnocellular nucleus, the caudal parts of the lateral hypothalamus and in the whole tuberal and infundibular area. A small number of weakly labeled cells was also observed in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Although most of the positive cells were observed in the hypothalamic and preoptic area, a few areas were also labeled in other brain regions. This was particularly the case for the nucleus taeniae, the nucleus intercollicularis and the central gray. The distribution of labeled cells in this study closely matched with the distribution of cells which accumulated radioactivity following injection of tritiated estradiol in a previous study. The distribution of cells labeled by immunocytochemistry was similar in males and females and no evidence for a quantitative dimorphism in the percentage of labeled cells could be obtained. All nuclei containing cells labeled for estrogen receptors also contain significant levels of aromatase with the exception of the ICo. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of euphausiid larvae along the coast of East Antarctica in the Dumont d’Urville Sea (139–145°E) during summer 2004
Vallet, Carole; Koubbi, Philippe; Sultan, Emmanuëlle et al

in Antarctic Science (2009), 21(03), 197-207

The distribution of euphausiid larvae along the coast of Terre Adélie, Antarctica, was assessed using oblique tows of a double-framed bongo net at 38 stations during summer 2004. Larvae of Euphausia ... [more ▼]

The distribution of euphausiid larvae along the coast of Terre Adélie, Antarctica, was assessed using oblique tows of a double-framed bongo net at 38 stations during summer 2004. Larvae of Euphausia crystallorophias and Thysanoessa macrura were observed. For E. crystallorophias larvae, the calyptopis I stage was dominant along the coast, while the most commonly observed stage of T. macrura was the furcilia. The distribution of E. crystallorophias larvae were correlated with abiotic factors, including depth and sea surface salinity, whereas those of T. macrura larvae were correlated with biotic factors, especially chlorophyll a and nitrate. Developmental stages of both species increased in age from west to east in the survey area, with younger developmental stages (metanauplius and calyptopis I) in the western part of the region and older stages (calyptopis II and III and furcilia I to VI) in the eastern part near the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT). It is suggested that these patterns could be linked with the water circulation and wind: near the MGT gyres could concentrate all developmental stages of both species near the coast, while katabatic winds near Dumont d'Urville will promote larval advection seawards, with younger stages near the coast and older stages further offshore. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (7 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of extracellular matrix glycoproteins during normal development of human kidney. An immunohistochemical study.
Mounier, F.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Gubler, M. C.

in Laboratory Investigation : Journal of Technical Methods & Pathology (1986), 54(4), 394-401

The distribution of types I, III, and IV collagens, fibronectin, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan during human fetal kidney development has been studied by indirect immunofluorescence ... [more ▼]

The distribution of types I, III, and IV collagens, fibronectin, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan during human fetal kidney development has been studied by indirect immunofluorescence. Fibronectin and interstitial collagens types I and III are present in undifferentiated mesenchyme, whereas the intrinsic basement membrane components, type IV collagen, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan are not detected. In differentiated cortex, types I and III collagens are detected only as interstitial connective fibers, whereas fibronectin is found in both interstitium and glomeruli where its distribution is dependent on the stage of maturation. It is found in both the mesangium and along capillary walls of immature glomeruli, and principally in the mesangium of mature ones. Basement membrane components delineated the branching ureteric bud. They also outlined the structures of the earliest stage of nephrogenesis (epithelial differentiation). In mature nephrons, they are found along glomerular, capsular, and tubular basement membranes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) in abdominal aortic aneurysm: High accumulation in macrophages seen on PET Imaging and immunohistology
Defawe, O. D.; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg et al

in Clinical Nuclear Medicine (2005), 30(5), 340-341

A 68-year-old man was hospitalized for unstable angina and underwent emergency coronary artery bypass surgery. During the operation, a pulsatile large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was discovered. To ... [more ▼]

A 68-year-old man was hospitalized for unstable angina and underwent emergency coronary artery bypass surgery. During the operation, a pulsatile large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was discovered. To define the optimal treatment of the abdominal aneurysm, after bypass surgery, CT scans and positron emission tomography (PET) were performed, as we routinely do. PET imaging combined with immunohistologic examination showed a region of increased F-18 FDG uptake corresponding to an inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic wall in contrast to the thrombus in the aneurysm (devoid of inflammatory cells). The luminal area showed midlevel F-18 FDG uptake corresponding to circulating mediators. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of fibronectin and collagen during mouse limb and palate development.
Silver, M. H.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Pratt, R. M.

in Differentiation : Research in Biological Diversity (1981), 18(3), 141-9

Indirect immunofluorescence has been used to study the distribution of fibronectin and collagen types I, II, and III in the developing primary and secondary palatal processes and forelimb buds of the ... [more ▼]

Indirect immunofluorescence has been used to study the distribution of fibronectin and collagen types I, II, and III in the developing primary and secondary palatal processes and forelimb buds of the Swiss Webster (NIH) mouse. In the palatal processes fibronectin and types I and III collagen are distributed throughout the mesenchyme. Fibronectin is present in the basement membrane, while types I and III collagen are localized in a linear, discontinuous fashion beneath the basement membrane. Fibronectin is not observed in the epithelium, including the presumptive fusion areas. In the forelimb bud these components show a similar distribution prior to chondrogenesis (early day 11). When chondrogenesis commences (late day 11 or early day 12) fibronectin and, to a lesser degree, types I and III collagen are apparently concentrated in the core mesenchyme, suggesting that fibronectin has a role in initiating chondrogenesis, perhaps by increasing cellular aggregation. Type II collagen is observed only in chondrogenic regions. The codistribution of fibronectin and types I and III collagen supports in vitro studies which indicate that cells use fibronectin to bind to collagen in the matrix. The developing chondrogenic regions appear to lose fibronectin gradually, concomitant with the appearance of type II collagen, suggesting that fibronectin is not involved in the maintenance of functional chondrocytes in their matrices. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistribution of freshwater snails in family-based VAC ponds and associated waterbosied with special reference to intermediate hosts of fish-borne zoonotic trematides in Nam Dinh province, Vietnam
Bui Thi, Dung ULg

in Acta Tropica (2010), 116

Fish-borne zoonotic trematodes, such as Clonorchis sinensis, heterophyids and others, constitute a public health concern in parts of northern Vietnam and infections with these trematodes are often thought ... [more ▼]

Fish-borne zoonotic trematodes, such as Clonorchis sinensis, heterophyids and others, constitute a public health concern in parts of northern Vietnam and infections with these trematodes are often thought to be linked to fish culture. One common fish culture system is the integrated fish-livestock (VAC) ponds where individual households have 1 or more ponds. Fish fry, mainly of various carp species, pro-duced in hatcheries, not necessarily local, are introduced into nursery ponds and after approximately 6 weeks, juvenile fishes are transferred to household ponds, referred to as grow-out ponds. Grow-out ponds are usually fertilized with organic debris, including animal excreta, to stimulate algal growth and subsequently fish growth. This paper describes the distribution of freshwater snails and occurrence of trematode infections in these in VAC ponds and associated habitats as part of a major study on risk factors of FZT infections in cultured fish in two communes, Nghia Lac and Nghia Phu, Nghia Hung District, Nam Dinh Province. The area is under intense rice cultivation with an extensive canal network supplying fields and also household VAC ponds. A total of 16 snail species was found and four were widely distributed i.e. Angulyagra polyzonata, Melanoides tuberculata, Bithynia fuchsiana and Pomacea insularum. Snail diver-sity and counts were higher in nursery ponds than in grow-out ponds. Species of the families Thiaridae and Viviparidae were more abundant than other species in VAC ponds while species of the Bithyniidae, Stenothyridae and Planorbidae dominated in rice fields and small canals. Trematode infections were found in eight snail species and among these M. tuberculata had the highest overall prevalence of infec-tion (13.28%). No trematode infections were found in species of the Viviparidae and Ampullaridae except for metacercariae. Parapleurolophocercous and pleurolophocercous cercariae constituted the most com-mon type of cercariae recovered, contributing 40.6% of all infections followed by echinostome cercariae (35.0%) and xiphidiocercariae (17.3%). Bithynia fuschiana and M. tuberculata had the most diverse trema-tode fauna. C. sinensis was not recorded in this study. The VAC pond system in this area, is very important for transmission of minute intestinal trematodes while they play little role in transmission of C. sinensis as its intermediate hosts, bithynid snails, rarely occur in these ponds. From a public health perspective this is positive as the effects of infections with intestinal trematodes are considered mild. On the other hand it is possible that even such subtle effects could have importance in public health as transmission is very intense in the area. And this in combination with the aquaculture importance, reduced marketability of fishes with high metacercariae loads, warrants that control efforts against these trematodes are initiated to reduce transmission in this production system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (8 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDistribution of glycogen during the development of the organ of Corti
Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Cloes, Marie ULg; Johnen, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2011, January 31)

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far from being elucidated. Using cytochemical methods at the light and ... [more ▼]

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far from being elucidated. Using cytochemical methods at the light and electron microscope levels, we examined the spatiotemporal distribution of polysaccharides during the development of the organ of Corti in rats from embryonic day 16 (E16) to postnatal day 15 (P15). At E16, small polysaccharide inclusions were detected in the cytoplasm of the future inner pillar cells by electron microscope only. These inclusions became obvious at the light microscope level at E17. At E19, the polysaccharide deposits were important within the inner pillar cells and they arose in the Hensen cells cytoplasm. Polysaccharide accumulations also appeared in the outer pillar cells and the Deiters cells from P3-P4. As the organ of Corti developed, the amount of polysaccharide inclusions within the inner and outer pillar cells decreased. At P15, large amount of polysaccharide deposits were visible in the Deiters cells whereas they had almost disappeared from the inner and outer pillar cells. Finally, we showed that the polysaccharide deposits present in the developing organ of Corti are PAS-positive and can be digested with a salivary amylase, suggesting that they are essentially constituted of glycogen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (11 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe distribution of hot hydrogen atoms produced by electron and proton precipitation in the Jovian aurora
Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1996), 101

The energy distribution functions of nonthermal thermospheric hydrogen atoms are calculated for electron and proton precipitation in the Jovian aurora. A numerical model taking into account the production ... [more ▼]

The energy distribution functions of nonthermal thermospheric hydrogen atoms are calculated for electron and proton precipitation in the Jovian aurora. A numerical model taking into account the production, elastic and inelastic relaxation and transport processes for hot H atoms is developed. This model is based on a Monte Carlo solution of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation for hot H atoms produced by electron and proton impact on H and H[SUB]2[/SUB] and exothermic chemical reactions. The distribution functions show a much higher energy tail for proton than electron precipitation. It is shown that the steady state flux of hot atoms (E>=2 eV) is essentially isotropic. The peak and column hot H densities are about 3×10[SUP]5[/SUP] cm[SUP]-3[/SUP] and 1×10[SUP]14[/SUP] cm[SUP]-3[/SUP] for a 100 erg cm[SUP]-2[/SUP]s[SUP]-1[/SUP] precipitation combining hard (22 keV) and soft (0.2 keV) electrons mixed with a 10 erg cm[SUP]-2[/SUP]s[SUP]-1[/SUP] flux of soft (0.3 keV) protons. These column densities, coupled with the wide range of hot H atom energies, may play an important role in the formation of the Lyman alpha line profile. Multiple scattering in the wings of the Ly alpha line by the fast H atoms is shown to partly account for the broad Ly alpha profile observed in the Jovian aurora with the Hubble space telescope. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)