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See detailDegradation of tyrosine in pig manure
Godefroid, J.; Antoine, P.; De Poorter, M. et al

Poster (1993, June)

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See detailDegré d'atteinte nerveuse périphérique dans la SLA, la SLP et la maladie de Kennedy
WANG, François-Charles ULg; Le Forestier, Nadine; GERARD, Pascale ULg et al

in Neurophysiologie Clinique = Clinical Neurophysiology (2006)

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See detailThe Degree of Correlation of Jovian and Saturnian Auroral Emissions With Solar Wind Conditions
Clarke, J. T.; Nichols, J.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, auroral emissions on Jupiter and Saturn are thought to be driven ... [more ▼]

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, auroral emissions on Jupiter and Saturn are thought to be driven primarily by internal processes, with the main energy source being the planets' rapid rotation. Limited evidence has suggested there might be some influence of the solar wind on Jupiter's aurorae, and indicated that auroral storms on Saturn can occur at times of solar wind pressure increases. To investigate in detail the dependence of auroral processes on solar wind conditions, a large campaign of observations of these planets has been undertaken using the Hubble Space Telescope, in association with measurements from planetary spacecraft and solar wind conditions both propagated from one AU and measured near each planet. The data indicate a consistent brightening of both the auroral emissions and Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) at Saturn close in time to the arrival of solar wind shocks and pressure increases, consistent with a direct physical relationship between Saturnian auroral processes and solar wind conditions. This correlation has been strengthened by the final campaign observations in Feb. 2008. At Jupiter the situation is less clear, with increases in total auroral power seen near the arrival of solar wind forward shocks, while little increase has been observed near reverse shocks. In addition, auroral dawn storms have been observed when there was little change in solar wind conditions. The data are consistent with some solar wind influence on some Jovian auroral processes, while the auroral activity also varies independently of the solar wind. This extensive data set will serve to constrain theoretical models for the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. [less ▲]

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See detailDegree of phosphorus saturation in agricultural loamy soils with a near-neutral pH
Renneson, Malorie ULg; Vandenberghe, Christophe ULg; Dufey, Joseph et al

in European Journal of Soil Science (2015), 66

The degree of phosphorus saturation (DPS) represents the ratio of sorbed phosphorus (P) to the P sorption capacity (PSC) of soils. In some countries, DPS is used to evaluate the risk of P loss and surface ... [more ▼]

The degree of phosphorus saturation (DPS) represents the ratio of sorbed phosphorus (P) to the P sorption capacity (PSC) of soils. In some countries, DPS is used to evaluate the risk of P loss and surface water eutrophication. This study investigated DPS measurement and prediction in neutral loamy soils fromWallonia, Belgium. A total of 57 agricultural topsoil samples subject to diverse P management were evaluated. No satisfactory relationship could be found between PSC determined by a one-point short-term isotherm in the laboratory and the sum of aluminium and iron extracted by oxalate (Alox +Feox). The equation PSC=a Alox +b pHw appeared to be more appropriate for estimating PSC in the soils studied. These soils had a near-neutral pH, and P fixation processes linked to the presence of calcium ions or carbonates were important. Comparisons of DPS with soil-test P and water-extracted P suggested that DPS could be a useful agronomic and/or environmental indicator. Our results also showed that DPS values between 20 and 30% corresponded to the agronomic optimum of soil P content. Consequently, DPS may be used as an indicator of P status in neutral soils, provided that the PSC assessment is adapted to the local soil characteristics. [less ▲]

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See detailDegree-scale GeV "Jets" from Active and Dead TeV Blazars
Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D.; Kachelriess, M. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2010), 719

We show that images of TeV blazars in the GeV energy band should contain, along with point-like sources, degree-scale jet-like extensions. These GeV extensions are the result of electromagnetic cascades ... [more ▼]

We show that images of TeV blazars in the GeV energy band should contain, along with point-like sources, degree-scale jet-like extensions. These GeV extensions are the result of electromagnetic cascades initiated by TeV γ-rays interacting with extragalactic background light and the deflection of the cascade electrons/positrons in extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs). Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the spectral and timing properties of the degree-scale extensions in simulated GeV band images of TeV blazars. We show that the brightness profile of such degree-scale extensions can be used to infer the light curve of the primary TeV γ-ray source over the past 10[SUP]7[/SUP] yr, i.e., over a time scale comparable to the lifetime of the parent active galactic nucleus. This implies that the degree-scale jet-like GeV emission could be detected not only near known active TeV blazars, but also from "TeV blazar remnants," whose central engines were switched off up to 10 million years ago. Since the brightness profile of the GeV "jets" depends on the strength and the structure of the EGMF, their observation provides additional information about the EGMF. [less ▲]

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See detailThe degree/rapidity of the metabolic deterioration following interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is influenced by the prevailing blood glucose Level.
Castillo, M. J.; Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1996), 81(5), 1975-8

This study aims at investigating the influence of the prevailing blood glucose level on the metabolic deterioration that follows a nocturnal interruption of a continuous sc insulin infusion (CSII ... [more ▼]

This study aims at investigating the influence of the prevailing blood glucose level on the metabolic deterioration that follows a nocturnal interruption of a continuous sc insulin infusion (CSII). Fifteen CSII-treated, C-peptide negative, diabetic patients have been studied CSII was interrupted from 2300 h to 0500 h. Blood was collected hourly from 2200 h to 0600 h. According to blood glucose (BG) levels at 2300 h, patients were classified as hypoglycemic (BG between 1.5 and 2.5 mmol/L, n = 5), normoglycemic (BG between 4.0 and 8.0 mmol/L, n = 5), or hyperglycemic (BG between 9.0 and 15.0 mmol/L, n = 5). At 2300 h, BG (mean +/- SEM) was 1.9 +/- 0.1, 6.2 +/- 0.7 and 11.2 +/- 1.0 mmol/L, respectively. After 6 h of CSII interruption, BG increased to 13.5 +/- 1.3, 14.1 +/- 1.2, and 19.4 +/- 1.2 mmol/L, respectively. At 2300 h, plasma 3-OH-butyrate levels were similar in the three groups (around 150 micromol/L). At 0500 h, significantly higher values were obtained for hyperglycemic (1460 +/- 127 micromol/L) than for normoglycemic (868 +/- 150 micromol/L) or hypoglycemic (837 +/- 80 micromol/L) patients. Enhanced lipolysis in initially hyperglycemic patients may contribute to accelerated ketogenesis and metabolic degradation. In conclusion, the metabolic deterioration that follows CSII interruption is influenced by the initial metabolic situation. Hypoglycemic patients deteriorate more rapidly, and hyperglycemic patients suffer a more important degradation. The latter are prone to rapid ketoacidosis if accidental CSII interruption occurs. [less ▲]

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See detailLes « degrés d’art » de la reproduction de tableaux : Proust et les prémices de l’industrie culturelle
Wicky, Erika ULg

in Image and Narrative (2014), 15(1),

Objets ambigus, hybrides entre la photographie et la peinture, accomplissant une tâche traditionnellement dévolue à la gravure, les reproductions photographiques de tableaux ont reçu, au XIXe siècle, un ... [more ▼]

Objets ambigus, hybrides entre la photographie et la peinture, accomplissant une tâche traditionnellement dévolue à la gravure, les reproductions photographiques de tableaux ont reçu, au XIXe siècle, un accueil témoignant d’une double tension entre art, document et industrie. Elles se sont trouvées au coeur de discours littéraires, critiques ou journalistiques qui tentaient de jauger leurs caractéristiques et leurs usages afin de déterminer non seulement leur valeur artistique et documentaire, mais aussi leur valeur sociale et commerciale. La réception de ces images nous renseigne sur la façon dont ont été accueillies ce qui nous apparaît aujourd’hui comme les prémices de l’industrie culturelle, ainsi que sur l’instauration des règles qui se sont établies pour régir la tarification, la circulation et la consommation des reproductions de tableaux, objets culturels et industriels affectés par des critères de valorisation différents de ceux appliqués aux oeuvres originales. C’est la logique et l’histoire de cette hiérarchie des reproductions de tableaux qu’il s’agit d’aborder en interrogeant le « degré d’art en plus » dont bénéficiait la gravure par rapport à la photographie, selon propos prêtés à la grand-mère du narrateur d’À la recherche du temps perdu de Proust. [less ▲]

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See detailDehiscence
Claeys, Stéphanie ULg

in Griffon, Dominique; Hamaide, Annick (Eds.) Complications in Small Animal Surgery (2016)

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See detailDéjà s'envole la fleur maigre, Paul Meyer, 1960. Sous le regard du témoin
Mélon, Marc-Emmanuel ULg

in Dujardin (Ed.) Regards sur le réel. Vingt documentaires du vingtième siècle (2013)

Analyse du film "Déjà s'envole la fleur maigre" de Paul Meyer (1960)

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See detail« Déjà », « aussi », « toujours » et « encore » … an en néo-égyptien
Winand, Jean ULg

in Grandet, P.; Gallois, Chr.; Pantalacci, L. (Eds.) Mélanges offerts à François Neveu (2008)

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See detailDekonstruktion und Weltschmerz. Die paradoxe Prosa Paul van Ostaijens
Spinoy, Erik ULg

in Missinne, Lut; Geeraedts, Loek (Eds.) Paul van Ostaijen, Die Avantgarde und Berlin (1998)

This chapter discusses the 'grotesque' prose written by modernist author Paul van Ostaijen during and after his stay in Berlin during the revolutionary postwar years.

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See detaildel 15N - del 13C relationships in suspended particles from the Gulf of Biscay
Dauby, Patrick ULg; Elskens, Marc

Conference (1996, July)

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See detailLe délai de prescription de l'action civile résultant d'une infraction : fin d'une controverse
Monville, Pierre ULg

in Revue de Jurisprudence de Liège, Mons et Bruxelles (2003)

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See detailDelay in feed access and spread of hatch: Importance of early nutrition
Willemsen, H.; Debonne, M.; Swennen, Q. et al

in World's Poultry Science Journal (2010), 66(2), 177-188

In a commercial hatchery, chicks (or poults) hatch over a 24-48 hour period. All chicks remain in the incubator until the majority of the chicks have emerged from the shell. Once removed from the ... [more ▼]

In a commercial hatchery, chicks (or poults) hatch over a 24-48 hour period. All chicks remain in the incubator until the majority of the chicks have emerged from the shell. Once removed from the incubator, the newly hatched chick has to undergo several hatchery treatments and is then transported before being placed on the broiler farm. This means that, under practical conditions, chicks are deprived of feed and water for up to 72 hours. In addition, the time of hatch within the hatching window and the spread of hatch cause variability in the amount of time that chicks are feed deprived. Literature on feed deprivation after hatch clearly demonstrates the detrimental effects of any delay in feed access on performance of the chicks with respect to growth, immune system activation, digestive enzyme stimulation and organ development. Improved management strategies, such as shortening the hatching window or the time to first feeding by specific management measures, provide an alternative in dealing with the negative effects caused by a delay in feed access. The development of pre-starter diets that better meet the needs of the newly hatched chicks or in ovo feeding to bridge the gap between hatch and first feeding provide other alternatives in overcoming these problems. However, speculation remains regarding the importance of in ovo or early feeding, or whether the in ovo or early feeding itself is responsible for the beneficial effects reported. The aim of the following review is to discuss the current status of research into early feeding and to stimulate future and further research regarding these topics. © World's Poultry Science Association 2010. [less ▲]

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See detailDelay in the execution of voluntary movement by electrical or magnetic brain stimulation in intact man. Evidence for the storage of motor programs in the brain.
Day, B. L.; Rothwell, J. C.; Thompson, P. D. et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (1989), 112 ( Pt 3)

Experiments were undertaken to study the effect on voluntary movement of an electrical or magnetic stimulus delivered to the brain through the scalp. Subjects were trained to flex or extend their wrist ... [more ▼]

Experiments were undertaken to study the effect on voluntary movement of an electrical or magnetic stimulus delivered to the brain through the scalp. Subjects were trained to flex or extend their wrist rapidly in response to an auditory tone. A single brain stimulus (electrical or magnetic) delivered after the tone and before the usual time of onset of the voluntary reaction could delay the execution of the movement for up to 150 ms, without affecting the pattern of the agonist and antagonist EMG bursts. The delay increased with increasing stimulus intensity and with stimuli which were applied nearer to the usual time of onset of the voluntary reaction. A stimulus given after the onset of the first voluntary agonist EMG burst only delayed the onset of the first antagonist and later EMG bursts. Movement was not delayed when similar experiments were performed with supramaximal stimulation of the median nerve instead of the brain stimulus. The delay following a cortical shock was not due to spinal motoneurons being inaccessible to descending input during the delay period since a second brain stimulus, given in the middle of the delay period, was capable of producing a direct muscle response. Neither could the delay be explained by the brain stimulus altering the time of the subject's intention to respond since a stimulus delivered to one hemisphere before an attempted simultaneous bilateral wrist movement produced a far greater delay of the contralateral than the ipsilateral movement. We suggest that the brain stimulus delayed movement by inhibiting a group of strategically placed neurons in the brain (probably in the motor cortex) which made them unresponsive for a brief period to the command signals they receive which initiate the motor program of agonist and antagonist muscle activity. The results have implications for the issues of the storage of motor programs, internal monitoring of central movement commands and the site of organization of the antagonist EMG burst. [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed and reduced coccolithophorid calcification under elevated PCO2
Delille, Bruno ULg; Harlay, Jérôme ULg; Zondervan, Ingrid et al

Poster (2004, May 10)

Numerous experiments to date have demonstrated that elevated PCO2 is detrimental to biogenic calcification rates. However, most of these experiments have been realized in batch or continuous cultures and ... [more ▼]

Numerous experiments to date have demonstrated that elevated PCO2 is detrimental to biogenic calcification rates. However, most of these experiments have been realized in batch or continuous cultures and give little information on the dynamics of calcification in natural conditions. The present work describes the development and decay of a nutrient-induced bloom of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi in a mesocosm experiment. The monitoring of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) and Total Alkalinity (TAlk) within the seawater enclosures allowed us to describe comprehensively day to day dynamics of both calcification and organic carbon production. Three atmospheric PCO2 conditions (glacial, present and next century) were simulated by bubbling CO2 mixtures, while total alkalinity was left to evolve from its present value. No conspicuous change of Net Community Production under elevated PCO2 was recorded while the production of inorganic carbon appeared to be affected in two ways. Firstly, the production rate of inorganic carbon appeared to be lowered by 40% in the next century PCO2 conditions, decreasing concomitantly the calcification to photosynthesis ratio from 0.75 (glacial conditions) to 0.45 (next century conditions). Secondly, the onset of calcification was delayed by 24~48h under elevated PCO2 conditions, reducing the overall length of calcification in the course of the bloom. These two effects would act to reduce the amount of precipitated CaCO3 by coccolithophorids in a High CO2 world [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed chlorophyll accumulation and pigment photodestruction in the epicotyls of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum)
Boddi, B.; Loudeche, R.; Franck, Fabrice ULg

in Physiologia Plantarum (2005), 125(3), 365-372

A comparison was performed of the tetrapyrrole transformations that occur upon irradiation of epicotyl or leaves of dark-grown Pisum sativum L. (var. Zsuzsi, Hungary). High performance liquid ... [more ▼]

A comparison was performed of the tetrapyrrole transformations that occur upon irradiation of epicotyl or leaves of dark-grown Pisum sativum L. (var. Zsuzsi, Hungary). High performance liquid chromatography analysis after continuous or flash-irradiation showed that the biosynthetic pathway from protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) to chlorophyll (Chl) a was markedly slowed down at the step of the reduction of geranylgeranyl(gg)-Chl to dihydrogeranylgeranyl (dhgg)-Chl in epicotyls, whereas phytyl-Chl was synthesized in leaves subjected to the same light treatments. Quantitative pigment analysis during continuous irradiations of different intensities also showed that significant Pchlide photodestruction occurred in epicotyls even under weak light. When both Pchlide and chlorophyllide and/or chlorophylls were present in epicotyls, Pchlide photodestruction was faster under 630-nm light than under 670-nm light, which indicates that this process is most efficiently promoted by Pchlide excitation. Pre-incubation of epicotyl segments with 10 mM ascorbate partly alleviated pigment photodestruction in white light. It is concluded that formation of photoactive Pchlide-Pchlide oxidoreductase complexes is important to prevent fast pigment photooxidation after Pchlide accumulation in the dark. [less ▲]

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