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See detailDeriving Risk Appetite and translating it into a meaningful set of limits
Hübner, Georges ULg; Nord, Andrew; Smith, Brian

Conference (2009, January)

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See detailDerjaguin-Broekhoff-de Boer analysis of adsorption in very disordered mesopores using probabilistic models
Gommes, Cédric ULg

Poster (2015, May)

Our current ability to produce mesoporous materials with ordered morphology has raised fascinating questions about the impact of geometrical disorder on adsorption and desorption states [1]. Many recent ... [more ▼]

Our current ability to produce mesoporous materials with ordered morphology has raised fascinating questions about the impact of geometrical disorder on adsorption and desorption states [1]. Many recent works have investigated the role of mild elements of disorder, such as local constriction or corrugation superimposed to otherwise geometrically ideal cylindrical pores [2,3]. These works have notably shown that elements of disorder may act as nucleation sites and destabilize vapor-like metastable states. The relevance of these perturbation-like results to fundamentally disordered materials, such as gels, is unclear. In particular, do vapor-like metastable states exist at all in this type of very disordered material? In the present communication, we address this question using probabilistic models to investigate the role of disorder. We generalize the classical Gaussian field models of porous materials [4] and use them to analyze adsorption and desorption in the Derjaguin-Broekhof-de Boer approximation. Our approach differs from earlier contributions in that both the adsorbent and the adsorbate are described in terms of probabilities [5]. This enables us to analyze the adsorbate configuration in very disordered solids using a low-dimensional yet realistic configuration space. We notably show that vapor-like metastable states are unlikely in gel-like disordered materials. [1] D.Wallacher, N. Künzner, D. Kovalev, N. Knorr, K. Knorr, Capillary condensation in linear mesopores of different shape, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (2004) 195704; [2] B. Coasne, A. Galarneau, F. Di Renzo, R.M.J. Pellenq, Effect of morphological defects on gas adsorption in nanoporous silicas, J. Phys. Chem. C 111 (2007) 15759; [3] C.J. Gommes, Adsorption, capillary bridge formation, and cavitation in SBA-15 corrugated mesopores: A Derjaguin-Broekhoff-de Boer analysis, Langmuir 28 (2012) 5101-5115; [4] R.J. Pellenq, P. levitz, Capillary condensation in a disordered mesoporous medium: A grand canonical Monte Carlo study, Molecular Physics 100 (2002) 2059;[5] C.J. Gommes, A.P. Roberts, in preparation. [less ▲]

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See detailDermal Dendritic Cells in Anogenital Warty Lesions Unresponsive to an Immune-Response Modifier
Arrese, J.; Paquet, Philippe ULg; Claessens, N. et al

in Journal of Cutaneous Pathology (2001), 28(3), 131-4

BACKGROUND: Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are responsible for a variety of proliferative epithelial lesions including anogenital condylomas. These lesions may regress during treatment with an immune ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are responsible for a variety of proliferative epithelial lesions including anogenital condylomas. These lesions may regress during treatment with an immune-response modifier such as imiquimod. The release of specific cytokines from the monocyte-macrophage lineage induces a cascade of events abating the HPV replication. METHOD: A total of 14 persistent warty anogenital lesions were excised 4 to 7 weeks after completing a 4-month imiquimod treatment. Another series of 25 untreated condylomas and 8 bowenoid papulosis served as controls. All examined lesions had been excised in otherwise healthy individuals with a normal immune status. Lesions were examined for the presence of Langerhans cells and subpopulations of the monocyte/macrophage/dendrocyte lineage using immunohistochemical detection of L1-protein, CD68, lysozyme and Factor-XIIIa. CD45R0-positive T lymphocytes were also identified. HPV capsid antigens and genotypes were searched for using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively. RESULTS: The persistent although treated anogenital lesions were identified as 10 viral condylomas, 3 bowenoid papulosis and 1 basal cell carcinoma. The inflammatory cell densities and distributions were similar in the untreated and imiquimod-resistant condylomas with the exception of Factor XIIIa-positive dendrocytes. These dermal dendritic cells were slim and rare in all imiquimod-resistant lesions. In contrast, about two-thirds of the untreated condylomas were enriched in these cells. CONCLUSION: As dermal dendritic cells play a role in the immune surveillance, their low densities in some lesions might be a key feature responsible for low cytokine local production and failure of imiquimod treatment. The combined apparent lack of Langerhans cell activation might suggest that both intraepidermal and intradermal compartments of antigen-presenting cells are affected in imiquimod-resistant lesions. [less ▲]

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See detailDermal dendrocyte ballooning.
Quatresooz, Pascale ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in American Journal of Clinical Dermatology (2006), 7(6), 391-2

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See detailDermal Dendrocytes and Photochemotherapy
Pierard, Gérald ULg; Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Arrese Estrada, Jorge ULg et al

in Virchows Archiv. A : Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology (1991), 418(4), 311-314

We studied the fate of dermal dendrocytes in patients treated with psoralens and ultraviolet light by combining immunohistochemistry and computerized image analysis. Factor-XIIIa-positive dermal ... [more ▼]

We studied the fate of dermal dendrocytes in patients treated with psoralens and ultraviolet light by combining immunohistochemistry and computerized image analysis. Factor-XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were found to be altered in these patients. When compared with controls, dermal dendrocytes were often increased in number and had an uneven size and tissue distribution. Their cytoplasm was occasionally fragmented. These changes were more pronounced when early photosclerosis was present. The alterations described probably reflect vascular changes, and may be responsible for immunomodulating actions and disorder of the connective tissue structure induced by ultraviolet light. [less ▲]

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See detailDermal ultrastructure in collagen VI myopathy.
Hermanns-Lê, Trinh ULg; PIERARD, Gérald ULg; Franchimont, Claudine ULg et al

in Ultrastructural Pathology (2013)

The COL VI mutations are responsible for a spectrum of myopathies. The authors report cutaneous ultrastructural alterations in a patient with COL6A2 myopathy. The changes include variations in size of ... [more ▼]

The COL VI mutations are responsible for a spectrum of myopathies. The authors report cutaneous ultrastructural alterations in a patient with COL6A2 myopathy. The changes include variations in size of collagen fibrils, flower-like sections of collagen fibrils, as well as thickening of vessel and nerve basement membranes. Electron microscopy of a skin biopsy contributes to the diagnosis of COL VI myopathies. [less ▲]

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See detailDermal ultrastructure in low Beighton score members of 17 families with hypermobile-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
Hermanns-Lê, Trinh ULg; REGINSTER, Marie-Annick ULg; Franchimont, Claudine ULg et al

in Journal of Biomedicine & Biotechnology (2012), 2012

The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH) and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural ... [more ▼]

The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH) and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatite actinique chronique severe traitee par ciclosporine: 2 cas
Paquet, Philippe ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie (2001), 128(1), 42-5

INTRODUCTION: The treatment of the severe forms of photodermatoses often requires potent systemic immunosuppressive drugs. We report two patients suffering from severe photodermatitis successfully treated ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: The treatment of the severe forms of photodermatoses often requires potent systemic immunosuppressive drugs. We report two patients suffering from severe photodermatitis successfully treated with oral cyclosporine. CASES REPORT: A 58-year-old man developed severe pruritic eczematous reactions for several years on light-exposed and light-protected skin following each sun exposure. A 66-year-old man showed similar lesions restricted to the head and neck. The clinical presentation and evolution as well as histologic, immunohistologic, allergologic and photobiologic assessments suggested the diagnosis of actinic reticuloid and persistent light reactivity, respectively. The lesions of both patients did not respond to a high dose regimen of systemic corticosteroids (methylprednisolone 1 mg/kg/day) for several weeks. The severity of cutaneous lesions and pruritus required another potent immunosuppressive treatment. Oral cyclosporine at the maximum daily dose of 4 mg/kg was given for three months. A rapid improvement of the pruritus and skin lesions occurred in the two patients, without significant side-effect. The first patient experienced recurrent lesions after termination of cyclosporine treatment during summer time. The other patient did not develop new skin eruption for 3 years after stopping the initial treatment with cyclosporine. DISCUSSION: Low-dose oral cyclosporine is a quick-acting and well tolerated symptomatic treatment of severe photodermatoses resistant to other systemic immunosuppressive drugs. However, therapeutic results do not consistently exhibit long-standing remanent effect. [less ▲]

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See detailUne dermatite atopique sensible à un antifongique IBE.
Franchimont, Claudine ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Dermatologie Actualité (2003), 75

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See detailDermatitis in a horse associated with the poultry mite (Dermanyssus gallinae)
Mignon, Bernard ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg

in Veterinary Dermatology (2008), 19(1), 38-43

This is the first documented case report of dermatitis associated with the poultry mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) in a horse. It occurred in a 16-year-old horse that was in contact with domestic hens ... [more ▼]

This is the first documented case report of dermatitis associated with the poultry mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) in a horse. It occurred in a 16-year-old horse that was in contact with domestic hens. Clinical signs consisted of severe pruritus, with self-induced hair loss mainly on the head. Despite the multiple skin scrapings performed during both day- and nighttime, mites were only isolated from the in-contact poultry and from the horse's environment, and not the horse. The animal was treated using a 2% permethrin solution, sprayed on the entire body once a week for 4 weeks, and by decontamination of the horse's immediate environment. Although eradication of the mites and elimination of further contact between the horse and the poultry were not achievable, recurrence of dermatitis was prevented by regular applications of permethrin on the horse and biannual decontamination of the horse's stable. [less ▲]

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See detail"Dermato-couture": points de suture utiles en chirurgie dermatologique
Jacquemin, Gael; Richert, Bertrand ULg; de LA BRASSINNE, Michel ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2003), 58(2), 88-94

Dermatologists performing skin surgery mostly use the square knot. Other underused or even forgotten suturing techniques may still be helpful in some instances. We shall emphasize some simple techniques ... [more ▼]

Dermatologists performing skin surgery mostly use the square knot. Other underused or even forgotten suturing techniques may still be helpful in some instances. We shall emphasize some simple techniques such as the horizontal mattress suture, the “cross stitch”, the “corner stitch” (half buried mattress suture), the buried dermal suture, the buried vertical mattress suture, the continuous mattress suture and the running intradermal suture. In given circumstances, all of them may improve suturing and promote healing. Technical aspects, advantages and disadvantages of each type of suture will be briefly described. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatologic Manifestations of the LEOPARD Syndrome
CAO, Sandrine ULg; NIKKELS, Arjen ULg

in The Open Dermatology Journal (2013), 7

The LEOPARD syndrome is an exceptional autosomal dominant genetic disease with a missence mutation of the PTPN11 gene in more than 90% of the cases. The principal clinical manifestations include extensive ... [more ▼]

The LEOPARD syndrome is an exceptional autosomal dominant genetic disease with a missence mutation of the PTPN11 gene in more than 90% of the cases. The principal clinical manifestations include extensive lentiginosis, heart conduction abnormalities, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonary stenosis, genital anomalies, mental retardation, growth retardation and deafness. A woman with a LEOPARD syndrome illustrates the progressive development of melanocytic nevi. In fact, the majority of lentigines are actually melanocytic nevi. Seqential digital demroscopy evidences progressive growth of some melanocytic lesions. The ever-increasing number of melanocytic nevi in the LEOPARD syndrome is a risk factor for melanoma and full body photography and dermoscopy are recommended for follow-up. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatological manifestations of varicella
EL HAYDERI, Lara ULg; NIKKELS, Arjen ULg

in Berhardt, Leon V. (Ed.) Advances in Medicine and Biology (2013)

The Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for chickenpox and herpes zoster (HZ). VZV displays neuro- and epidermotropism, although other cells lines may be infected. A permissive type of VZV ... [more ▼]

The Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for chickenpox and herpes zoster (HZ). VZV displays neuro- and epidermotropism, although other cells lines may be infected. A permissive type of VZV infection in the epidermal and/or infundibular keratinocytes forms the majority of the skin lesions. This infections leads to intra-epidermal blistering, clinically characterized by vesicular lesions. During varicella, the haematogenous dissemination of VZV virions infects the dermal endothelial cells, which in their turn infect dermal dendrocytes who transport he virions to the keratinocytes of the basal layer. During HZ, the VZV virions arrive in the keratinocytes after release by the free nerve endings in close contact with the basal keratinocytes. The skin-associated immune system (SALT) furthermore determines the outcome of the virus/host cell relation. The spectrum of the VZV-related skin infections is presented with their pathogenic mechanisms, including lichenoid HZ, granulomatous HZ, verrucous HZ and follicular HZ. It is important to be aware of these manifestations of the VZV, in particular as VZV may present serious morbidity int eh immunocompromised patient. [less ▲]

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See detailDermatologie et Rhumatologie.
Quatresooz, Pascale ULg

Scientific conference (2007)

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See detailLes dermatomycoses de l'estran.
CAUCANAS, Marie ULg; FRANCHIMONT, Claudine ULg; PIERARD, Gérald ULg

in Dermatologie Actualité (2011), 127

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See detailDermatophylose équine: revue à partir d'un cas clinique
Vandenput, Sandrina ULg; Manteca, C.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1996), 140(2), 125-129

From a clinical case of equine dermatophilosis, a short review of literature is proposed. The aetiology, causal factors, symptoms and lesions are brievely reviewed. Therapeutics and prophylaxis are ... [more ▼]

From a clinical case of equine dermatophilosis, a short review of literature is proposed. The aetiology, causal factors, symptoms and lesions are brievely reviewed. Therapeutics and prophylaxis are outlined. [less ▲]

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See detailThe dermatophyte species Arthroderma benhamiae: intraspecies variability and mating behaviour
Symoens, F; Jousson, O; Packeu, A et al

in Journal of Medical Microbiology (2013), 62

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See detailDermatophytes and Dermatophytoses
Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Mignon, Bernard ULg

in Mycopathologia (2008), 166(5-6), 235-424

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See detailDermatophytes as Saprophytes and Pathogens
Monod, M; Mignon, Bernard ULg; Staib, P

in Sullivan, DJ; Moran, GP (Eds.) Human Pathogenic Fungi: Molecular Biology and Pathogenic Mechanisms (2014)

Dermatophytes infect the stratum corneum, nails and hair and are the most common agents of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. At present the genome of seven species has been sequenced. Between 22 ... [more ▼]

Dermatophytes infect the stratum corneum, nails and hair and are the most common agents of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. At present the genome of seven species has been sequenced. Between 22.5 and 24 Mb, the dermatophyte genomes are smaller in size than those of Coccidioides spp., Histoplasma spp. and Aspergillus spp. They are enriched for particular families of genes encoding secreted proteases, fungal specific kinases and proteins containing the LysM domain that is known to bind chitin. Different tools were recently developed to improve genetic analyses of dermatophytes, including efficient systems for targeted gene inactivation, gene silencing and broad transcriptional profiling techniques. Unexpectedly, gene expression profiles in the skin and hair of infected guinea pigs were found to be very different from those during in vitro growth using hard keratin as a substrate. Instead of the major in vitro expressed protease genes, others were found to only be activated in the skin of infected animals. In other words, the expression of putative virulence genes in dermatophytoses is more complex than previously assumed and likely depends on the site and type of infection. Further broad transcriptional profiling approaches during infections will give new insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of dermatophytes. [less ▲]

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