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Peer Reviewed
See detailCross-cultural differences in teaching strategies, opportunities-to-learn and achievement in reading
Lafontaine, Dominique ULg; Monseur, Christian ULg; Baye, Ariane ULg et al

Conference (2013, August 31)

Using the PISA 2009 data from 43 education systems, the present study aimed at exploring to what extent is reading achievement of 15 year-olds explained by variations in reading curriculum. Factorial ... [more ▼]

Using the PISA 2009 data from 43 education systems, the present study aimed at exploring to what extent is reading achievement of 15 year-olds explained by variations in reading curriculum. Factorial analyses have been performed on the “reading for school” (RFS) variables. Four factors were extracted; configural, metric and scalar invariance were checked for, showing that configural and metric invariance were met, whereas scalar invariance was not. Correlations in each country were then computed between the 4 RFS factors and reading achievement score. Finally, Multi-level analyses were used to estimate the school and student level variance in reading achievement explained in each country by the 4 RFS factors and the students’ socioeconomic and cultural background. Two of the factors (interpretation of literary texts and use of non-continuous texts) were positively related to reading achievement and one (use of functional texts) was negatively related to reading in most of the countries. Interestingly, the factor Traditional literature course was negatively linked with achievement in many countries, but positively related to reading in a number of Asian countries. The multilevel analyses showed that more than half of the between-school variance on average could be explained by the RFS factors (uniquely or jointly with background variables). The between-school variance explained by the RFS factors was larger in tracked educational systems, suggesting that curricular variations in the language courses linked to tracking might have an impact on reading even if reading is not usually taught as a specific subject to 15-year-olds students. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (4 ULg)
See detailThe Cross-Cultural Legacy: Critical and Creative Writings in Memory of Hena Maes-Jelinek
Collier, Gordon; Davis, Geoffrey; Delrez, Marc ULg et al

Book published by Brill/Rodopi (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCross-Cultural Patterns in the Work of Nicholas Jose
Delrez, Marc ULg

Conference (2000)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)
See detailCross-cultural perspectives on white-collar crime
Dantinne, Michaël ULg; Kellens, Georges ULg

in Buruma, Y.; Van Kempen, P. H.; Mertens, Th. (Eds.) Op het rechete pad (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (3 ULg)
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See detailCROSS-CULTURAL TRANSLATION, VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF THE FRENCH VERSION OF THE « PAIN BELIEFS QUESTIONNAIRE »
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Duvallon, Louise ULg; Roussel, N. et al

in Back to Specific Low Back Pain (2016, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (5 ULg)
See detailThe Cross-Dressed Caribbean: Writing, Politics, Sexualities
Ledent, Bénédicte ULg; Fumagalli, Maria Cristina; Del Valle Alcalá, Roberto

Book published by University of Virginia Press (2013)

Studies of sexuality in Caribbean culture are on the rise, focusing mainly on homosexuality and homophobia or on regional manifestations of normative and nonnormative sexualities. The Cross-Dressed ... [more ▼]

Studies of sexuality in Caribbean culture are on the rise, focusing mainly on homosexuality and homophobia or on regional manifestations of normative and nonnormative sexualities. The Cross-Dressed Caribbean extends this exploration by using the trope of transvestism not only to analyze texts and contexts from anglophone, francophone, Spanish, Dutch, and diasporic Caribbean literature and film, but also to highlight reinventions of sexuality and resistance to different forms of exploitation and oppression. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailCross-entropy based rare-event simulation for the identification of dangerous events in power systems
Belmudes, Florence ULg; Ernst, Damien ULg; Wehenkel, Louis ULg

in Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Probabilistic Methods Applied to Power Systems (PMAPS-08) (2008)

We propose in this paper a novel approach for identifying rare events that may endanger power system integrity. This approach is inspired by the rare-event simulation literature and, in particular, by the ... [more ▼]

We propose in this paper a novel approach for identifying rare events that may endanger power system integrity. This approach is inspired by the rare-event simulation literature and, in particular, by the cross-entropy (CE) method for rare event simulation. We propose a general framework for exploiting the CE method in the context of power system reliability evaluation, when a severity function defined on the set of possible events is available. The approach is illustrated on the IEEE 30 bus test system when instability mechanisms related to static voltage security are considered. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (7 ULg)
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See detailThe cross-entropy method for power system combinatorial optimization problems
Ernst, Damien ULg; Glavic, Mevludin; Stan, Guy-Bart et al

in Proceedings of the 2007 Power Tech (2007)

We present an application of a cross-entropy based combinatorial optimization method for solving some unit commitment problems. We report simulation results and analyze, under several perspectives ... [more ▼]

We present an application of a cross-entropy based combinatorial optimization method for solving some unit commitment problems. We report simulation results and analyze, under several perspectives (accuracy, computing times, ability to solve efficiently large-scale problems), the performances of the approach. [less ▲]

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See detailCross-entropy optimization of control policies with adaptive basis functions
Busoniu, Lucian; Ernst, Damien ULg; Babuska, Robert et al

in IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics-Part B: Cybernetics (2011), 41(1), 196-209

This paper introduces an algorithm for direct search of control policies in continuous-state, discrete-action Markov decision processes. The algorithm looks for the best closed-loop policy that can be ... [more ▼]

This paper introduces an algorithm for direct search of control policies in continuous-state, discrete-action Markov decision processes. The algorithm looks for the best closed-loop policy that can be represented using a given number of basis functions (BFs), where a discrete action is assigned to each BF. The type of the BFs and their number are specified in advance and determine the complexity of the representation. Considerable flexibility is achieved by optimizing the locations and shapes of the BFs, together with the action assignments. The optimization is carried out with the cross-entropy method and evaluates the policies by their empirical return from a representative set of initial states. The return for each representative state is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The resulting algorithm for crossentropy policy search with adaptive BFs is extensively evaluated in problems with two to six state variables, for which it reliably obtains good policies with only a small number of BFs. In these experiments, cross-entropy policy search requires vastly fewer BFs than value-function techniques with equidistant BFs, and outperforms policy search with a competing optimization algorithm called DIRECT. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCross-hand replantation: preliminary case report.
Kutz, J E; Sinclair, S W; Rao, V et al

in Journal of Microsurgery (1982), 3(4), 251-4

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See detailCross-linkable polythiophene diblock copolymers: toward high thermally stable organic solar cells
Ouhib, Farid ULg; Tomassetti, Mirco ULg; Manca, Jean et al

Conference (2013, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (8 ULg)
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See detailCross-linked pH sensitive polymer micelles for drug delivery systems
Cajot, Sébastien ULg; Jérôme, Christine ULg

Poster (2009, December 08)

Over the last decade, polymer micelles attracted an increasing interest in drug pharmaceutical research because they could be used as efficient drug delivery systems. Micelles of amphiphilic block ... [more ▼]

Over the last decade, polymer micelles attracted an increasing interest in drug pharmaceutical research because they could be used as efficient drug delivery systems. Micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers are supramolecular core-shell type assemblies of tens of nanometers in diameter. In principle, the micelles core is usually constructed with biodegradable hydrophobic polymers such as aliphatic polyesters, e.g. poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), which serves as a reservoir for the incorporation of various lipophilic drugs. Water soluble poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is most frequently used to build the micelle corona because it is very efficient in preventing protein adsorption at surfaces and in stabilizing the micelles in the blood compartment, giving rise to particles invisible to the body defence system (so-called stealthy or long circulating particles). The tumour targeting of a cytotoxic agent refers to the passive accumulation of polymer nanocarriers to solid tumours (EPR effect) followed by active internalization in tumor cells. The internalization of the drug is required for cell death because most cytotoxic drugs act intracellularly. Accordingly, polymer micelles are usually modified by specific ligands. No-specific ligands can be used if their exposition is modulated by the pH decrease typical of tumour tissues. The release of the drug is ruled by diffusion and degradation of the biodegradable polymer used as reservoir. Even if micelles get a high stability in aqueous media thanks to their low critical micellar concentration, the dissociation of micelles is not always preserved when they are injected in the blood compartment. The cross-linking of the core of micelles by disulfide bridges will provide the stability of micelles after the administration and will release the drugs intracellularly by enzymatic breaking of disulfide bridges. This work consists in the development of new macromolecular architectures for the targeting of tumour cells. pH sensitive copolymers able to micellize so as non-specific ligand like biotin is exposed on their surface in response to pH decrease typical for tumour tissues will be synthesized by the incorporation of pH-sensitive linkers, e.g. imine benzoïc linkers. In addition, the core of these new micelles will be cross-linked by disulfide bridges to prevent dissociation around healthy cells and trigger the drug release inside tumour cells. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 131 (17 ULg)
See detailCross-linked polymer micelles made of polyphosphate containing amphiphilic copolymers for drug delivery
Riva, Raphaël ULg; Vanslambrouck, Stéphanie ULg; Ergül, Zeynep ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 01)

In the pharmaceutical field, amphiphilic block copolymers are of great interest for the nanovectorization of active principles in Drug Delivery. Indeed, new drugs are synthesized each day but in too many ... [more ▼]

In the pharmaceutical field, amphiphilic block copolymers are of great interest for the nanovectorization of active principles in Drug Delivery. Indeed, new drugs are synthesized each day but in too many cases, their high hydrophobicity makes them useless because of the absence of an appropriated administration method. Typically, amphiphilic block copolymers present the remarkable property to self-assemble in water with formation, in most cases, of spherical micelles characterized by a hydrophobic core and a hydrophylic corona. Rapidly, their ability to encapsulate a hydrophobic drug in their hydrophiobic core was investigated to increase the solubility of the drug in aqueous media, prevent its degradation and decrease its toxicity. However, polymer micelles suffer of the main drawback to be unstable in diluted medium, leading to a premature release of the drug, when the concentration falls down the critical micellar concentration (CMC), which it is rapidly observed after intravenous injection. This work aims at reporting on the development of a drug delivery device based on a new amphiphilic block copolymers made of degradable polyphosphate and bioeliminable poly(ethylene oxide). Thanks to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and their structure similar to natural biomacromolecules, polyphosphates are appealing polymers for biomedical applications. In contrast to aliphatic polyesters, polyphosphate properties and functionality are easily tuned via the chemical nature of the lateral chains R. In order to get rid of the CMC, the crosslinking of the micelle’s core was realized by UV radiation, in order to fulfill the increasingly stringent requirements of biomedical applications. For this purpose, photo-cross-linkable groups were introduced on the polyphosphate backbone. The effect of the crosslinking rate on the drug loading and the drug release was evaluated using doxorubicin as model drug. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailCross-Modal Decoding of Neural Patterns Associated with Working Memory: Evidence for Attention-Based Accounts of Working Memory
Majerus, Steve ULg; Cowan, Nelson; Peters, Frédéric ULg et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2016), 26

Recent studies suggest common neural substrates involved in verbal and visual working memory (WM), interpreted as reflecting shared attention-based, short-term retention mechanisms. We used a machine ... [more ▼]

Recent studies suggest common neural substrates involved in verbal and visual working memory (WM), interpreted as reflecting shared attention-based, short-term retention mechanisms. We used a machine-learning approach to determine more directly the extent to which common neural patterns characterize retention in verbal WM and visual WM. Verbal WM was assessed via a standard delayed probe recognition task for letter sequences of variable length. Visual WM was assessed via a visual array WM task involving the maintenance of variable amounts of visual information in the focus of attention. We trained a classifier to distinguish neural activation patterns associated with high- and low-visual WM load and tested the ability of this classifier to predict verbal WM load (high–low) from their associated neural activation patterns, and vice versa. We observed significant between-task prediction of load effects during WM maintenance, in posterior parietal and superior frontal regions of the dorsal attention network; in contrast, between-task prediction in sensory processing cortices was restricted to the encoding stage. Furthermore, between-task prediction of load effects was strongest in those participants presenting the highest capacity for the visual WM task. This study provides novel evidence for common, attention-based neural patterns supporting verbal and visual WM. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (25 ULg)
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See detailCross-modal facilitation is not specific to self-face recognition
Brédart, Serge ULg

in Consciousness & Cognition (2004), 13(3), 610-612

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See detailCross-modal identification of six subregions within the left PMd and their functional characterization
Genon, Sarah ULg; Li, Hai; Fan, Lingzhong et al

Poster (2015, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 ULg)
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See detailCross-reactive T cell responses in HIV CRF01_AE and B'-infected intravenous drug users: implications for superinfection and vaccines.
Promadej-Lanier, Nattawan; Thielen, Caroline ULg; Hu, Dale J et al

in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses (2009), 25(1), 73-81

Abstract We previously observed limited cross-reactive T cell responses in two HIV-1-superinfected injection drug users (IDUs) before superinfection [Ramos A, et al.: J Virol 2002;76(15):7444-7452]. To ... [more ▼]

Abstract We previously observed limited cross-reactive T cell responses in two HIV-1-superinfected injection drug users (IDUs) before superinfection [Ramos A, et al.: J Virol 2002;76(15):7444-7452]. To elucidate the role of such responses in superinfection we examined cross-reactive T cell responses in IDUs infected with a single HIV-1 subtype. In this study, IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays were performed using recombinant vaccinia constructs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 43 IDUs singly infected with CRF01_AE or B' from the same cohort as the superinfected IDUs. PBMCs were from time points corresponding to pre- (early) or post- (late) superinfection in the superinfected IDUs. We observed that most singly infected IDUs had cross-reactivity in samples from early (84% of CRF01_AE and 78% of B'-infected IDUs) and late (96% of CRF_01AE and 77% of B'-infected IDUs) time points. Frequent homologous reactivity at early (67% of CRF-01AE and 100% of B') and late (84% of CRF01_AE-infected and 100% of B'-infected IDUs) time points was also observed. Cross-reactive responses were predominantly to Pol and were broader and higher in CRF01_AE than in B'-infected IDUs (medians of 825 vs. 90 and 585 vs. 60 spot-forming units/10(6) PBMCs at early and late time points, respectively). Our results show that cross-reactive responses were more prevalent with greater height and breadth in singly infected IDUs than previously observed in corresponding collection time points of superinfected IDU. Thus, low or absent cross-reactivity may have contributed to the previously observed superinfections. These data are relevant for understanding superinfection and improving vaccine design. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (3 ULg)