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See detailDiscriminating between overshooting and rotational mixing in massive stars: any help from asteroseismology?
Miglio, Andrea ULg; Montalban Iglesias, Josefa ULg; Eggenberger, P. et al

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2009, July 01), 158

Chemical turbulent mixing induced by rotation can affect the internal distribution of μ near the energy-generating core of main-sequence stars, having an effect on the evolutionary tracks similar to that ... [more ▼]

Chemical turbulent mixing induced by rotation can affect the internal distribution of μ near the energy-generating core of main-sequence stars, having an effect on the evolutionary tracks similar to that of overshooting. However, this mixing also leads to a smoother chemical composition profile near the edge of the convective core, which is reflected in the behavior of the buoyancy frequency and, therefore, in the frequencies of gravity modes. We show that for rotational velocities typical of main-sequence B-type pulsating stars, the signature of a rotationally induced mixing significantly perturbs the spectrum of gravity modes and mixed modes, and can be distinguished from that of overshooting. The cases of high-order gravity modes in Slowly Pulsating B stars and of low-order g modes and mixed modes in β Cephei stars are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscriminating net ecosystem exchange between different vegetation plots in a heterogeneous forest
Aubinet, Marc ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Perrin, Dominique ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2005), 132(3-4), 315-328

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See detailDiscrimination between Alzheimer dementia and controls by automated analysis of multicenter FDG PET
Herholz, K.; Salmon, Eric ULg; Perani, D. et al

in Neuroimage (2002), 17(1), 302-316

A new diagnostic indicator of FDG PET scan abnormality, based on age-adjusted t statistics and an automated voxel-based procedure, is presented and validated in a large data set comprising 110 normal ... [more ▼]

A new diagnostic indicator of FDG PET scan abnormality, based on age-adjusted t statistics and an automated voxel-based procedure, is presented and validated in a large data set comprising 110 normal controls and 395 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) that were studied in eight participating centers. The effect of differences in spatial resolution of PET scanners was minimized effectively by filtering and masking. In controls FDG uptake declined significantly with age in anterior cingulate and frontolateral perisylvian cortex. In patients with probable AD decline of FDG uptake in posterior cingulate, temporoparietal, and prefrontal association cortex was related to dementia severity. These effects were clearly distinct from age effects in controls, suggesting that the disease process of AD is not related to normal aging. Women with probable AD had significantly more frontal metabolic impairment than men. The new indicator of metabolic abnormality in AD-related regions provided 93% sensitivity and specificity for distinction of mild to moderate probable AD from normals, and 84% sensitivity at 93% specificity for detection of very mild probable AD (defined by Mini Mental Score 24 or better). All regions related to AD severity were already affected in very mild AD, suggesting that all vulnerable areas are affected to a similar degree already at disease onset. Ventromedial frontal cortex was also abnormal. In conclusion, automated analysis of multicenter FDG PET is feasible, provides insights into AD pathophysiology, and can be used potentially as a sensitive biomarker for early AD diagnosis. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA). [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination between Bifidobacterium species from human and animal origin by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Bechoux, Nathalie ULg; Leonard, Tamara et al

in Journal of Food Protection (2004), 67(6), 1284-1288

Bifidobacteria are normal intestinal flora in humans and animals. The genus Bifidobacterium includes 31 species of significant host specificity. Taking into account their properties, we proposed to use ... [more ▼]

Bifidobacteria are normal intestinal flora in humans and animals. The genus Bifidobacterium includes 31 species of significant host specificity. Taking into account their properties, we proposed to use bifidobacteria as fecal contamination indicators. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism on the 16S rDNA gene was used to distinguish the different Bifidobacterium species. Sixty-four strains belonging to 13 different species were differentiated from animal or human origin using one or two restriction enzymes. Moreover, the primers used were specifics of the Bifidobacterium genus. Therefore, this method made it possible to determine both the presence of bifidobacteria in a sample and its origin of contamination. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination des crânes du campagnol des champs, Microtus arvalis (Pallas) et du campagnol souterrain, Pitymys subterraneus (de Sélys Longchamps) en l'absence de mandibule
Libois, Roland ULg

in Mammalia (1979), 43(1), 99-112

1799 skulls of common vole and 535 skulls of pine voles from different Belgian populations have been studied in three aspects: i) the pattern of the nasal-frontal and premaxillary-frontal sutures. This ... [more ▼]

1799 skulls of common vole and 535 skulls of pine voles from different Belgian populations have been studied in three aspects: i) the pattern of the nasal-frontal and premaxillary-frontal sutures. This pattern is an excellent criterion by which identify the both species, and it is almost always accurate. ii) the value of ratios between a skull's height and the length of its diastema. This technique enables one to discriminate between common vole specimens with ratios above 95 % and pine vole specimens below 86%. iii) the width of the interorbital constrition. This seems to be an equally good criterion of identification, even for young animals. Hovewer, in Europe, it seems to have a clinal variation, a finding which should be verified. For the Belgium populations studied, the values for the common vole range from 2.60 to 3.50 mm (mean 3.09 mm). In the pine vole they range from 3.30 to 4.00 mm (mean 3.65 mm). [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination en prix
Aliaj, Arjeta ULg

Master's dissertation (2010)

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See detailDiscrimination of animals treated with growth promoters
Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg; Degand, Guy ULg; Gaspar, Pol et al

in Meat Focus International (1993)

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See detailDiscrimination of epidemic and sporadic isolates of Serratia marcescens by three typing methods
Chetoui, Hafid; Delhalle, Edmond; Rousseaux, Danièle et al

Poster (1995, September)

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See detailDiscrimination of grassland species and their classification in botanical families by laboratory scale NIR hyperspectral imaging: preliminary results
Dale, Laura ULg; Thewis, André ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg et al

in Talanta (2013), 116

The objective of this study was to discriminate by a NIR line scan hyperspectral imaging, taxonomic plant families comprised of different grassland species. Plants were collected from semi-natural meadows ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to discriminate by a NIR line scan hyperspectral imaging, taxonomic plant families comprised of different grassland species. Plants were collected from semi-natural meadows of the National Apuseni Park, Apuseni Mountains, Gârda area (Romania) according to botanical families. Chemometric tools such as PLS-DA were used to discriminate distinct grassland species, and assign the different species to botanical families. Species within the Poacea family and Other Botanical Families could be distinguished (R2=0.91 and 0.90, respectively) with greater accuracy than those species in the Fabacea family (R2=0.60). A correct classification rate of 99% was obtained in the assignment of the various species to the proper family. Moreover a complete study based on wavelength selection has been performed in order to identify the chemical compound related to each botanical family and therefore to the possible toxicity of the plant. This work could be considered as a first step for the development of a complete procedure for the detection and quantification of possible toxic species in semi-natural meadows used by grazing animals. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination of Isobaric Leu/Ile Residues by MALDI In-source Decay Mass Spectrometry
Asakawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

in Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2013), 24(2), 297-300

MALDI in-source decay (ISD) has been used for the top-down sequencing of proteins. The use of 1,5-diaminonapthalene (1,5-DAN) gave strong intensity of w ions, which are informative fragments and can be ... [more ▼]

MALDI in-source decay (ISD) has been used for the top-down sequencing of proteins. The use of 1,5-diaminonapthalene (1,5-DAN) gave strong intensity of w ions, which are informative fragments and can be helpful for the distinction of the isobaric amino acids, Leu and Ile. Our data suggests that the w fragments are formed from z* radical fragment by unimolecular dissociation and high abundance of w ions in MALDI-ISD with 1,5-DAN can be understood as resulting from the low collision rate in the MALDI plume. The MALDI-ISD with 1,5-DAN could be a useful method for the top-down sequencing of proteins including discrimination of Leu and Ile near the C-terminal end. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination of parasitized aphids by a hoverfly predator: effects on larval performance, foraging, and oviposition behavior
Almohamad, Raki; Verheggen, François ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

in Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata (2008), 128(1), 73-80

The choice of oviposition site by female aphidophagous predators is crucial for offspring performance, especially in hoverflies whose newly hatched larvae are unable to move over large distance. Predator ... [more ▼]

The choice of oviposition site by female aphidophagous predators is crucial for offspring performance, especially in hoverflies whose newly hatched larvae are unable to move over large distance. Predator and parasitoid interactions within the aphidophagous guild are likely to be very important in influencing the choices made by predatory hoverfly females. In the present study, the foraging and oviposition behavior of the aphidophagous hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus DeGeer (Diptera: Syrphidae) was investigated with respect to the parasitized state of its aphid prey, Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Homoptera: Aphididae), that were parasitized by Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae). We also recorded the number of eggs laid by hoverfly females when subjected to parasitized aphids. Furthermore, we studied the influence of being fed with parasitized aphids on hoverfly larval performance. Hoverfly females did not exhibit any preference for plants infested with unparasitized or aphids parasitized for 7 days. On the other hand, plants infested with mummies or exuvia were less attractive for E. balteatus. These results were correlated with (i) the number of eggs laid by E. balteatus females and (ii) larval performance. Thus, our results demonstrate that E. balteatus behavior is affected by parasitoid presence through their exploitation of aphid colonies. Indeed, hoverfly predators select their prey according to the developmental state of the parasitoid larvae. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination of pure grassland species using NIR Hyperspectral Imaging
Dale, Laura ULg; Bogdan, Anca Dorina; Pacurar, Florin Simion et al

Poster (2012, June 03)

The objective of this study was to discriminate by hyperspectral imaging system, SWIR ImSpector N25E, different pure grassland species (Festuca rubra L., Trifolium repens L., Agrostis capillaris L ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to discriminate by hyperspectral imaging system, SWIR ImSpector N25E, different pure grassland species (Festuca rubra L., Trifolium repens L., Agrostis capillaris L., Hieracium aurantiacum L., Arnica montana L.) into grassland species mixtures. All the samples were collected from natural meadows of the National Apuseni Park, Apuseni Mountains, Gârda area (Romania). The samples were air-dried, then prepared using the protocol for NIRS analysis adapted on the scanning linear system. For images acquisition, the Hyper See program was used. Then a model build under MatLab (PLS–DA) was used to discriminate pure species from the mixtures of two or three species. This analysis was carried out in order to see, on images obtained previously from the floristic composition of experimental parcels, if the pure species are or are not recognized according to the spectral data base. More than 99% correct predictions for species discrimination were obtained. This study should guide us to verify if a toxic species is present or not in natural meadows used as food for animals. The floristic composition of a meadow can be determinate only if we have in the data base, spectra for each identified species, as being part of the mixture. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination of shifts in a soil microbial community assosciated with TNT-contamination using a functional ANOVA of 16S rRNA hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays
Eyers; Smoot, J. C.; Smoot, L. M. et al

in Environmental Science & Technology (2006), 40

A functional ANOVA analysis of the thermal dissociation of RNA hybridized to DNA microarrays was used to improve discrimination between two soil microbial communities. Following hybridization of in vitro ... [more ▼]

A functional ANOVA analysis of the thermal dissociation of RNA hybridized to DNA microarrays was used to improve discrimination between two soil microbial communities. Following hybridization of in vitro transcribed 16S rRNA derived from uncontaminated and 2,4,6- trinitrotoluene contaminated soils to an oligonucleotide microarray containing group- and species-specific perfect match (PM) probes and mismatch (MM) variants, thermal dissociation was used to analyze the nucleic acid bound to each PM-MM probe set. Functional ANOVA of the dissociation curves generally discriminated PM-MM probe sets when Td values (temperature at 50% probe-target dissociation) could not. Maximum discrimination for many PM and MM probes often occurred at temperatures greater than theTd. Comparison of signal intensities measured prior to dissociation analysis from hybridizations of the two soil samples revealed significant differences in domain-, group-, and species-specific probes. Functional ANOVA showed significantly different dissociation curves for 11 PM probes when hybridizations from the two soil samples were compared, even though initial signal intensities for 3 of the 11 did not vary. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination of two geographically distinct populations of sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax, using stable isotopic signatures of mercury (δ202Hg, Δ199Hg)
Cransveld, Alice ULg; Amouroux, David; Koutrakis, Emmanuil et al

Poster (2014, May 15)

Despite the reduction of mercury (Hg) emissions in Europe in the last decades, Hg emissions are increasing worldwide and concentrations found in some marine predators remain high. This raises questions on ... [more ▼]

Despite the reduction of mercury (Hg) emissions in Europe in the last decades, Hg emissions are increasing worldwide and concentrations found in some marine predators remain high. This raises questions on mercury's biogeochemical cycle at both local and global scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility to use mercury isotopic signature in fish as a tool to discriminate different polluted areas and potential pollution sources. Indeed, Hg can exhibit both mass-dependent (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF). While MDF may occur during biological cycling inter alia and could be used to understand bioaccumulation processes, MIF provides a unique fingerprint of specific chemical pathways, such as photochemical transformations. In this context, information provided by Hg isotopes would help to improve environmental management strategies. A preliminary set of four and ten juvenile common sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax were collected from the North Sea and the Aegean Sea respectively. T-Hg was analysed by direct mercury analyser (DMA), speciation by gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (GC-ICP-MS) and Hg isotope analysis were performed using cold vapour generation with multicollector ICP-MS. Total Hg concentrations in all tissues were higher in individuals from the North Sea ( Hgtot muscle=1,14 ± 0,48 mg.kg-1 dw) than from Greece (0,60 ± 0,06 mg.kg-1 dw). Speciation analysis shows that MeHg is the predominant form of Hg in muscle (89% MeHg on average) but not in liver (51% MeHg on average). Isotopic mass dependent values (δ202Hg) values were always higher in muscle than in liver and related to Hg species distribution. For mass independent isotopic signature, sea bass from the Aegean Sea had a systematically higher Δ199Hg value than individuals from the North sea (e.g.: 0,56 ± 0,05‰ and 0,32 ± 0,06‰ respectively in muscle). While mass dependent isotopic signature probably reflects some internal Hg metabolism, mass independent isotopic signature seems definitely site dependent. Such isotopic discrimination might be in agreement with difference in both mercury sources and cycling in the North and Aegean Seas. These preliminary results indicate that Hg isotopes may thus help to discriminate fish from different areas. This promising outcome must be further confirmed by extending the number of individuals and locations to be investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination positive et mobilité scolaire
Bouchat, Thérèse-Marie; Delvaux, Bernard; Hindryckx, Geneviève ULg

Report (2005)

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See detailDiscrimination self/non-self
Heinen, Ernst ULg

in Encyclopedia of Life Sciences (2005)

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See detailDiscrimination thresholds of the reverberation in large volumes by naïve listeners
Billon, Alexis ULg; Embrechts, Jean-Jacques ULg

in Proceedings of the Acoustics 2012 Nantes conference (2012, April)

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