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Peer Reviewed
See detailDopamine D4 selective ligands as potential antipsychotics
Liégeois, Jean-François ULg; Bruhwyler, J.

in Awouters, Frank (Ed.) Proceedings of the XIVth International Symposium on Medicinal Chemistry (1997)

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See detailDopamine et dépression: le neurotransmetteur oublié.
Pitchot, William ULg; Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

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See detailDopamine modulates male sexual behavior in Japanese quail in part via actions on noradrenergic receptors
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Dejace, C.; Ball, G. F. et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2005), 163(1), 42-57

In rats, dopamine (DA) facilitates male sexual behavior through its combined action on D1- and D2-like receptors, in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) as well as other brain areas. In Japanese quail ... [more ▼]

In rats, dopamine (DA) facilitates male sexual behavior through its combined action on D1- and D2-like receptors, in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) as well as other brain areas. In Japanese quail, systemic injections of dopaminergic drugs suggested a similar pharmacology but central injections have never been performed. Recent electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that DA effects in the MPOA of quail are mediated mainly through the activation of alpha(2)-noradrenergic receptors. Previous studies of DA action on behavior used specific dopaminergic agonists/antagonists and therefore unintentionally avoided the potential cross-reaction with a-receptors. The present study was thus designed to investigate directly the effects of DA on male sexual behavior and to test whether the interaction of DA with heterologous receptors affects this behavior. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of DA or NE inhibited copulation in a dose-dependent manner. Systemic injections of yohimbine, an alpha(2)-noradrenergic antagonist, modulated copulation in a bimodal manner depending on the dose injected. Interestingly, a behaviorally ineffective dose of yohimbine markedly reduced the inhibitory effects of DA when injected 15 min before. Together, these results show for the first time that i.c.v. injections of DA itself inhibit male sexual behavior in quail and suggest that the interaction of DA with alpha(2)-receptors has behavioral significance. (C) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine, motivation, and the evolutionary significance of gambling-like behaviour
Anselme, Patrick ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2013), 256(1), 1-4

If given a choice between certain and uncertain rewards, animals tend to prefer the uncertain option, even when the net gain is suboptimal. Animals are also more responsive to reward-related cues in ... [more ▼]

If given a choice between certain and uncertain rewards, animals tend to prefer the uncertain option, even when the net gain is suboptimal. Animals are also more responsive to reward-related cues in uncertain situations. This well-documented phenomenon in many animal species is in opposition to the basic principles of reinforcement as well as the optimal foraging theory, which suggest that animals will prefer the option associated with the highest reward rate. How does the brain code the attractiveness of unreliable/poor reward sources? And how can we interpret this evidence from an adaptive point of view? I argue that unpredictability and deprivation – whether physiological or psychological – enhance motivation to seek valuable stimuli for the same reason: compensating the difficulty an organism has to predict significant objects and events in the environment. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine-GABAergic mechanisms of rearing and locomotion in infant and weanling mice
Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Jodogne, C.

in Psychobiology (1990), 18(4), 443-450

Examined tue modulatory effects of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA)-A agonist muscimol on supported rearing and locomotion induced by the indirect dopamine agonist D-amphetamine (DAM). A total of 288 ... [more ▼]

Examined tue modulatory effects of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA)-A agonist muscimol on supported rearing and locomotion induced by the indirect dopamine agonist D-amphetamine (DAM). A total of 288 infant, weanling, and adult outbred mice were tested in 2 experiments. In adult mice, muscimol at 1,3 mg/kg DAM-induced locomotion but not rearing, whereas 1,9 mg/kg muscimol blocked both behaviors. While 0,025 mg/kg muscimol reduced 2mg/kg DAM-induced rearing without altering locomotion in infants, it affected neither rearing nor locomotion in weanlings. In infant mice, 0,075 mg/kg muscimol engendered gnawing and self-biting, a typical effect of dopamine^GABAergic pharmacological activation. Maturation of dopamine^GABAergic behavioral functions may follow a near-monotonic continuity starting a few days after birth. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved) [less ▲]

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See detailDopaminergic function in panic disorder: comparison with major and minor depression.
Pitchot, William ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg; Gonzalez Moreno, A. et al

in Biological Psychiatry (1992), 32(11), 1004-11

Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine might be involved in anxiety states. In this study, we assessed the growth hormone (GH) response to apomorphine (a dopaminergic agonist) 0.5 mg SC in nine ... [more ▼]

Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine might be involved in anxiety states. In this study, we assessed the growth hormone (GH) response to apomorphine (a dopaminergic agonist) 0.5 mg SC in nine drug-free inpatients meeting Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for panic disorder who were age-matched and gender-matched with nine major depressive, and nine minor depressive inpatients. The three groups differed significantly in their mean GH peak response: 5.29 +/- 2.75 ng/ml in major depressives, 26.27 +/- 12.71 ng/ml in minor depressives, and 37.28 +/- 10.58 ng/ml in panics, with a significantly higher response in panic than in either minor or major depressive patients. These results support dopaminergic overactivity in panic disorder as compared with major and minor depression. [less ▲]

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See detailDopaminergic influences on motor memory formation in the elderly. A combined behavioral-TMS/PET study.
Floel, Agnes; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg; Giraux, Pascal et al

in Abstract Viewer/Itinerary planner. Washington DC: Society for Neuroscience (2005), (Suppl. S), 104-104

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See detailDopaminergic neurones: much more than dopamine?
Seutin, Vincent ULg

in British Journal of Pharmacology (2005), 146(2), 167-9

Midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurones sustain important physiological functions such as control of motricity, signalling of the error in prediction of rewards and modulation of emotions and cognition ... [more ▼]

Midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurones sustain important physiological functions such as control of motricity, signalling of the error in prediction of rewards and modulation of emotions and cognition. Moreover, their degeneration leads to Parkinson's disease and they may be dysfunctional in other pathological states, such as schizophrenia and drug abuse. A subset of DA neurones has been known for many years to contain releasable peptides such as neurotensin and cholecystokinin. However, recent experimental evidence indicates that the phenotype of DA neurones may be much more diverse, since it is suggested that, under certain conditions, they may also release glutamate, cannabinoids and even serotonin. [less ▲]

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See detailDoppler echocardiographic features in an acute crisis of chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD) in horses
Amory, Hélène ULg; Brihoum, M; Christmann, U et al

in Proceedings of the 39th Annual Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) (2000)

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See detailDoppler Echocardiographic follow up of three horses with congestive heart failure and treated with quinapril, digoxin, and diuretics
Leroux, Aurélia ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Borde, Laura ULg et al

Poster (2011, February)

Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are recommended therapy in human and canine patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), but little is known concerning their efficiency to treat horses with CHF ... [more ▼]

Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are recommended therapy in human and canine patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), but little is known concerning their efficiency to treat horses with CHF. Enalapril has been shown to be poorly absorbed in horses and quinapril has been shown to decrease the severity of the insufficiency and to increase the stroke volume (SV) and the cardiac output (CO) in horses with mitral regurgitation (MR) without signs of CHF. The objective of this cases report was to evaluate the effect of quinapril associated with routine treatment in horses with CHF. Three horses with clinical, echocardiographic and electrocardiographic signs of severe MR, CHF and secondary atrial fibrillation were studied (Fig 1 to 3). None of them had been previously treated for those problems. According to the ACVIM classification system for management of canine CHF, they were therefore classified in class C. They were treated with quinapril 0.2mg/kg SID PO, digoxin 0.011mg/kg BID PO, and furosemide 1mg/kg BID IM. Standard echocardiographic and Doppler measurements were performed before treatment (T0), and 1 and 4 weeks after starting treatment (W1 and W4, respectively). All horses showed a transient clinical improvement (decrease of edemas and disappearance of the dyspnea) after 1 week of treatment, but clinical signs deteriorated within the following weeks in 2 horses that were euthanized for ethical reasons. The third horse kept a steady clinical status and was discharged with the treatment pursued at home. Evolution (in %) of main echocardiographic parameters at W1 and W4 compared to T0 values are showed in Table1. Large individual variations in response to the treatment were seen. Nevertheless, in all horses, a decrease of the Heart Rate (HR) was observed after 1 week of treatment, but the HR increased again after 1 month of treatment (Fig 4). On the contrary, no increase in SV or CO, and no decrease in LVIDd were seen in response to treatment (Fig 5). In the 2 horses that were euthanized, the fractional shortening (FS) and the pre-ejection to ejection time ratio (PEP/ET) decreased and the mitral E peak velocity increased with treatment, whereas they followed the opposite evolution in the surviving horse. No conclusion can be drawn from this study because of the limited number of studied cases. However, it would be interesting to extend it to additional cases and to less severely affected cases (i.e. horses classified in class C after initial treatment or class B horses). Negative chronotropic effect of digoxin was suggested after 1 week of treatment since a decrease of the HR was observed in all horses. However, this effect seemed to decrease after 1 month of treatment. Those preliminary results of echocardiography suggest that quinapril in association with digoxin and furosemide at the used dosage could be inefficient to reduce the left ventricular filling pressure and to improve the myocardial contractility in horses with severe CHF. This could however be due to the fact that the 3 studied horses were cases refractory to classic treatment (thus to be classified in class D). [less ▲]

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See detailDoppler echocardiographic measurement of cardiac output in the calf: a preliminary study
Amory, Hélène ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Brihoum, M et al

in Proceedings of the World Assoc. Buiatrics Congress (2000)

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See detailDoppler Echocardiographic Reference Values in Healthy Donkeys
Amory, Hélène ULg; Bertrand, P.; Delvaux, Véronique ULg et al

in Matthews, N. S.; Taylor, T. S. (Eds.) Veterinary Care of Donkeys (2004)

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See detailDoppler echocardiographic repercussions of a 12 week treadmill training period in Standardbreds
Amory, Hélène ULg; De Moffarts, Brieuc; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in 43rd Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (2004)

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See detailDoppler Echocardiographic Study of Left and Right Ventricular Function During Dobutamine Stress Testing in Conscious Healthy Dogs
Mc Entee, Kathleen ULg; Clercx, Cécile ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (1999), 60(7), 865-71

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate left and right ventricular filling and ejection performances by use of Doppler echocardiography in healthy, conscious dogs submitted to dobutamine stress testing. ANIMALS: 10 ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate left and right ventricular filling and ejection performances by use of Doppler echocardiography in healthy, conscious dogs submitted to dobutamine stress testing. ANIMALS: 10 unsedated, healthy adult Beagles. PROCEDURE: Doppler echocardiography was performed during cardiac stress testing on each dog twice at 24-hour intervals. Dobutamine was infused in 10 micrograms/kg of body weight/min incremental dosages, from 12.5 to 42.5 micrograms/kg/min. Duration of each step was 15 minutes. Doppler measurements were recorded at baseline and at each stage of dobutamine infusion, whereas aortic diameter was measured at baseline and at peak dosage by use of two-dimensional echocardiography. RESULTS: Dobutamine infusion induced a significant increase in velocity time integrals and in peak flow velocities at the aortic, pulmonic, mitral, and tricuspid valves. Acceleration time-to-deceleration time ratio at the aortic wave also was increased significantly. On the other hand, ejection time, acceleration time, and deceleration time at the aortic and pulmonic valves and peak flow velocity of the E wave-to-peak flow velocity of the A wave ratio at the mitral and tricuspid valves decreased significantly during the test. The acceleration time-to-deceleration time ratio at the pulmonic wave was unchanged. A significant, progressive increase in cardiac index also was observed during dobutamine infusion, with a maximal increase of 104% from baseline. This was mediated initially by an increase in stroke index and, at higher dosages, by an increase in heart rate. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Doppler echocardiography performed during dobutamine stress testing may be a reliable method of assessing myocardial function in dogs with cardiovascular disease. [less ▲]

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See detailDoppler Profiles of Proton Auroral Emissions Derived From High Resolution FUV Spectra
Chua, D. H.; Dymond, K. F.; Budzien, S. A. et al

Conference (2002, December 01)

In this paper we present new FUV observations of Doppler-shifted Lyman-ë± emissions from proton aurorae obtained from the High-resolution Ionospheric and Thermospheric Spectrograph (HITS) aboard the ... [more ▼]

In this paper we present new FUV observations of Doppler-shifted Lyman-ë± emissions from proton aurorae obtained from the High-resolution Ionospheric and Thermospheric Spectrograph (HITS) aboard the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). The Doppler profiles of the Lyman-ë± auroral emissions serve as proxies for the energy spectra of precipitating protons in the ionosphere. These observations remedy two previous shortcomings in proton aurora studies. There have been few spectral measurements of Doppler-shifted H/H[SUP]+[/SUP] emission profiles with which to validate existing models of proton flux transport in the ionosphere. Even fewer are spectral measurements of this kind over large spatial scales that would extend our understanding of proton aurora to a global level. The HITS instrument observes the Doppler shifted H Lyman-ë± emissions from proton precipitation at 0.5 Ì· resolution over the width of the auroral oval traversed by the ARGOS spacecraft. The measured Doppler spectra of proton emissions are then modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation of proton flux transport. The model parameters which include the incoming proton energy, pitch angle, and energy flux distributions are adjusted until the predicted Lyman-ë± Doppler profiles match the observations. This technique allows us to quantify the evolution of proton precipitation during varying levels of auroral activity with both spectral information and large-scale spatial coverage. We present our analysis of proton auroral observations for an isolated substorm event as an example. [less ▲]

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See detailDoppler ultrasonography and single-fiber laser Doppler flowmetry for measurement of hind limb blood flow in anesthetized horses
Raisis, Anthea L; Young, Lesley E; Taylor, Polly M et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (2000), 61(3), 286-290

OBJECTIVE: To use Doppler ultrasonography and single-fiber laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) to evaluate blood flow in the dependent and nondependent hind limbs of anesthetized horses and to evaluate changes ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To use Doppler ultrasonography and single-fiber laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) to evaluate blood flow in the dependent and nondependent hind limbs of anesthetized horses and to evaluate changes in femoral arterial blood flow and microvascular skeletal muscle perfusion in response to administration of phenylephrine hydrochloride or dobutamine hydrochloride. ANIMALS: 6 healthy adult horses. PROCEDURE: Horses were anesthetized and positioned in left lateral recumbency. Doppler ultrasonography was used to measure velocity and volumetric flow in the femoral vessels. Single-fiber LDF was used to measure relative microvascular perfusion at a single site in the semimembranosus muscles. Phenylephrine or dobutamine was then administered to decrease or increase femoral arterial blood flow, and changes in blood flow and microvascular perfusion were recorded. RESULTS: Administration of phenylephrine resulted in significant decreases in femoral arterial and venous blood flows and cardiac output and significant increases in mean aortic blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance, and PCV. Administration of dobutamine resulted in significant increases in femoral arterial blood flow, mean aortic blood pressure, and PCV. Significant changes in microvascular perfusion were not detected. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggest that Doppler ultrasonography and single-fiber LDF can be used to study blood flows in the hind limbs of anesthetized horses. However, further studies are required to determine why changes in femoral arterial blood flows were not associated with changes in microvascular perfusion [less ▲]

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See detailDorian Cumps (red.), Enjeux et tendances de la littérature flamande. Speciaal nummer van Etudes Germaniques 61
Spinoy, Erik ULg

in Internationale Neerlandistiek (2009), 2(3), 87

This is a review of a conference book on recent Flemish literature.

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See detailDorothée Goffin à la recherche du bien-être intestinal
Dubuisson, Elise

in EOS le magazine des sciences (2010), 30(janvier/février 2011), 70-71

Article présentant les recherches effectuées par le Dr Dorothée Goffin dans le domaine des prébiotiques et en particulier des isomaltooligosaccharides

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See detailDorsal horn dendroarchitectonics in the human spinal cord
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Brown, A. G.; Rethelyi (Eds.) Spinal Cord Sensation (1981)

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